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Topic: What do you want to make today?
orientcourt Posted: Sunday, August 18, 2019 6:57:38 PM
This Message is for Zazzles Owners and Management.
"Re Searching For Products as a Customer" The one reply that sums up how difficult it is for customers to navigate our marketplace is from Fuzzy Felosarix Posted 16th August 2019. {Quote} "It's all about the customer experience, once you get them here. That means not only meeting their expectations, but exceeding them. You can't do the latter if you don't take care of the former first.

This is what makes me kinds nuts, here. Even though the site needs to stand out from competitors, being different just to be different does not cut it. Customer expectations aren't just about the order and fulfillment process. They start with what customers encounter when they reach the site.

How many customers arrive here for their 'first time ever' online shopping experience? I suspect not many; most probably already have some experience with ecommerce. So their expectations begin with what they've already encountered in that regard.

Speaking for myself (and I buy a lot online), the first thing I notice is organization. If a site isn't organized in a way that makes sense/makes things easy to find, I won't even bother trying to make it work, unless they are the sole source for what I need. I will pay more somewhere else for ease of the shopping experience, because a poorly organized site makes me suspicious about their ability to even fulfill my order. Disorganization up front probably means chaos inside the business.

That said, even an 'organized' site doesn't always make for the best shopping experience, because it matters how the site is organized, not merely that it has some semblance of organization to it. For shoppers, that means things need to be familiar enough for them to find their way without having to experiment, or click on things without a clear idea of what will happen (and fulfillment of that expectation.)

When I look at the Zazzle home page, what I see is a site that suffers from not being able to step outside their own knowledge of the place. As a designer with direct contact with some of my customers, I've had to do a lot of coaching with a buyer to walk them through finding and ordering something here. If they can't do it on their own right from the start, I have to wonder if it's them, or a problem with the site. Knowing my customer isn't stupid and has shopped online before, I'm going with the latter issue.

Yes, we've all heard about how smart Zazzle's shoppers are, how they can figure things out, etc. But that's putting it all on the site's visitors. They shouldn't have to figure it out. It should be easy for them, from start to finish.

"What do you want to make today?" I'm not here to 'make' anything. Oh, it's a search box - which I know only because of the magnifying glass icon. What's wrong with "Search"? One word, instead of making me read seven that just confuse things.

So I click in the box, and I get a drop-down. That immediately makes me think that I can't type anything in the box, that I need to drill down through the displayed subject instead. Whoops. If something looks a text box, I'm not expecting it to act like a button/drop-down list - and it shouldn't for that very reason. You've immediately defied my expectations in a way that doesn't enhance my experience. Drop-down boxes traditionally have an arrow at one end, so that you get a visual cue to open the drop-down. So I'm baffled by the behavior of this box right from the beginning.

Hovering over "Products" in the drop-down menu is the only item that gives me some clue what it's about, via the window that appears to the right. As a new shopper, "Designers", "Makers", and "Collections" mean nothing to me. I don't care about them - I just want to search for something.

Starting with "Products", I don't see what I'm looking for in the window, so I click on the "See All Results" button. That's an extra click; why not show me all the top-level categories in that first window, so I can get there more quickly? (And "see all results"? I haven't actually searched for anything yet, why the word "results"? I'm about to find out...)

Welp, that wasn't helpful. I'm no closer to being able to search or seeing product categories than I was from the start. In fact, I would have been better off going through the small print, easy to miss product category labels below that "what do you want to make" button, disguised as a text box. Remember - I don't know that I can type in the search box, because I was given this drop-down, supposedly to ease navigation.

So what am I seeing? Results for "" - now I think I've screwed up somehow. Definitely not having a great experience so far. What to do? I've got a bunch of blue buttons, but none of them really speak to me...

Oh, here we go - a "Refine by category" drop-down. Now we're getting somewhere. So I click on "Men's T-Shirts."

Gah. More blue boxes, still no search box. If I made it this far as a new shopper, chances are I'm ready to call it quits.

That's just one example of how frustrating the site can be to navigate. I'll assume you don't want to hear more." {End of Quote}


I hope Zazzle Management reads this detailed important message! Thankyou for your time Jilly See
Topic: What do you want to make today?
orientcourt Posted: Sunday, August 18, 2019 6:57:38 PM
This Message is for Zazzles Owners and Management.
"Re Searching For Products as a Customer" The one reply that sums up how difficult it is for customers to navigate our marketplace is from Fuzzy Felosarix Posted 16th August 2019. {Quote} "It's all about the customer experience, once you get them here. That means not only meeting their expectations, but exceeding them. You can't do the latter if you don't take care of the former first.

This is what makes me kinds nuts, here. Even though the site needs to stand out from competitors, being different just to be different does not cut it. Customer expectations aren't just about the order and fulfillment process. They start with what customers encounter when they reach the site.

How many customers arrive here for their 'first time ever' online shopping experience? I suspect not many; most probably already have some experience with ecommerce. So their expectations begin with what they've already encountered in that regard.

Speaking for myself (and I buy a lot online), the first thing I notice is organization. If a site isn't organized in a way that makes sense/makes things easy to find, I won't even bother trying to make it work, unless they are the sole source for what I need. I will pay more somewhere else for ease of the shopping experience, because a poorly organized site makes me suspicious about their ability to even fulfill my order. Disorganization up front probably means chaos inside the business.

That said, even an 'organized' site doesn't always make for the best shopping experience, because it matters how the site is organized, not merely that it has some semblance of organization to it. For shoppers, that means things need to be familiar enough for them to find their way without having to experiment, or click on things without a clear idea of what will happen (and fulfillment of that expectation.)

When I look at the Zazzle home page, what I see is a site that suffers from not being able to step outside their own knowledge of the place. As a designer with direct contact with some of my customers, I've had to do a lot of coaching with a buyer to walk them through finding and ordering something here. If they can't do it on their own right from the start, I have to wonder if it's them, or a problem with the site. Knowing my customer isn't stupid and has shopped online before, I'm going with the latter issue.

Yes, we've all heard about how smart Zazzle's shoppers are, how they can figure things out, etc. But that's putting it all on the site's visitors. They shouldn't have to figure it out. It should be easy for them, from start to finish.

"What do you want to make today?" I'm not here to 'make' anything. Oh, it's a search box - which I know only because of the magnifying glass icon. What's wrong with "Search"? One word, instead of making me read seven that just confuse things.

So I click in the box, and I get a drop-down. That immediately makes me think that I can't type anything in the box, that I need to drill down through the displayed subject instead. Whoops. If something looks a text box, I'm not expecting it to act like a button/drop-down list - and it shouldn't for that very reason. You've immediately defied my expectations in a way that doesn't enhance my experience. Drop-down boxes traditionally have an arrow at one end, so that you get a visual cue to open the drop-down. So I'm baffled by the behavior of this box right from the beginning.

Hovering over "Products" in the drop-down menu is the only item that gives me some clue what it's about, via the window that appears to the right. As a new shopper, "Designers", "Makers", and "Collections" mean nothing to me. I don't care about them - I just want to search for something.

Starting with "Products", I don't see what I'm looking for in the window, so I click on the "See All Results" button. That's an extra click; why not show me all the top-level categories in that first window, so I can get there more quickly? (And "see all results"? I haven't actually searched for anything yet, why the word "results"? I'm about to find out...)

Welp, that wasn't helpful. I'm no closer to being able to search or seeing product categories than I was from the start. In fact, I would have been better off going through the small print, easy to miss product category labels below that "what do you want to make" button, disguised as a text box. Remember - I don't know that I can type in the search box, because I was given this drop-down, supposedly to ease navigation.

So what am I seeing? Results for "" - now I think I've screwed up somehow. Definitely not having a great experience so far. What to do? I've got a bunch of blue buttons, but none of them really speak to me...

Oh, here we go - a "Refine by category" drop-down. Now we're getting somewhere. So I click on "Men's T-Shirts."

Gah. More blue boxes, still no search box. If I made it this far as a new shopper, chances are I'm ready to call it quits.

That's just one example of how frustrating the site can be to navigate. I'll assume you don't want to hear more." {End of Quote}


I hope Zazzle Management reads this detailed important message! Thankyou for your time Jilly See
Topic: What do you want to make today?
orientcourt Posted: Sunday, August 18, 2019 6:57:38 PM
This Message is for Zazzles Owners and Management.
"Re Searching For Products as a Customer" The one reply that sums up how difficult it is for customers to navigate our marketplace is from Fuzzy Felosarix Posted 16th August 2019. {Quote} "It's all about the customer experience, once you get them here. That means not only meeting their expectations, but exceeding them. You can't do the latter if you don't take care of the former first.

This is what makes me kinds nuts, here. Even though the site needs to stand out from competitors, being different just to be different does not cut it. Customer expectations aren't just about the order and fulfillment process. They start with what customers encounter when they reach the site.

How many customers arrive here for their 'first time ever' online shopping experience? I suspect not many; most probably already have some experience with ecommerce. So their expectations begin with what they've already encountered in that regard.

Speaking for myself (and I buy a lot online), the first thing I notice is organization. If a site isn't organized in a way that makes sense/makes things easy to find, I won't even bother trying to make it work, unless they are the sole source for what I need. I will pay more somewhere else for ease of the shopping experience, because a poorly organized site makes me suspicious about their ability to even fulfill my order. Disorganization up front probably means chaos inside the business.

That said, even an 'organized' site doesn't always make for the best shopping experience, because it matters how the site is organized, not merely that it has some semblance of organization to it. For shoppers, that means things need to be familiar enough for them to find their way without having to experiment, or click on things without a clear idea of what will happen (and fulfillment of that expectation.)

When I look at the Zazzle home page, what I see is a site that suffers from not being able to step outside their own knowledge of the place. As a designer with direct contact with some of my customers, I've had to do a lot of coaching with a buyer to walk them through finding and ordering something here. If they can't do it on their own right from the start, I have to wonder if it's them, or a problem with the site. Knowing my customer isn't stupid and has shopped online before, I'm going with the latter issue.

Yes, we've all heard about how smart Zazzle's shoppers are, how they can figure things out, etc. But that's putting it all on the site's visitors. They shouldn't have to figure it out. It should be easy for them, from start to finish.

"What do you want to make today?" I'm not here to 'make' anything. Oh, it's a search box - which I know only because of the magnifying glass icon. What's wrong with "Search"? One word, instead of making me read seven that just confuse things.

So I click in the box, and I get a drop-down. That immediately makes me think that I can't type anything in the box, that I need to drill down through the displayed subject instead. Whoops. If something looks a text box, I'm not expecting it to act like a button/drop-down list - and it shouldn't for that very reason. You've immediately defied my expectations in a way that doesn't enhance my experience. Drop-down boxes traditionally have an arrow at one end, so that you get a visual cue to open the drop-down. So I'm baffled by the behavior of this box right from the beginning.

Hovering over "Products" in the drop-down menu is the only item that gives me some clue what it's about, via the window that appears to the right. As a new shopper, "Designers", "Makers", and "Collections" mean nothing to me. I don't care about them - I just want to search for something.

Starting with "Products", I don't see what I'm looking for in the window, so I click on the "See All Results" button. That's an extra click; why not show me all the top-level categories in that first window, so I can get there more quickly? (And "see all results"? I haven't actually searched for anything yet, why the word "results"? I'm about to find out...)

Welp, that wasn't helpful. I'm no closer to being able to search or seeing product categories than I was from the start. In fact, I would have been better off going through the small print, easy to miss product category labels below that "what do you want to make" button, disguised as a text box. Remember - I don't know that I can type in the search box, because I was given this drop-down, supposedly to ease navigation.

So what am I seeing? Results for "" - now I think I've screwed up somehow. Definitely not having a great experience so far. What to do? I've got a bunch of blue buttons, but none of them really speak to me...

Oh, here we go - a "Refine by category" drop-down. Now we're getting somewhere. So I click on "Men's T-Shirts."

Gah. More blue boxes, still no search box. If I made it this far as a new shopper, chances are I'm ready to call it quits.

That's just one example of how frustrating the site can be to navigate. I'll assume you don't want to hear more." {End of Quote}


I hope Zazzle Management reads this detailed important message! Thankyou for your time Jilly See
Topic: What do you want to make today?
orientcourt Posted: Sunday, August 18, 2019 6:57:38 PM
This Message is for Zazzles Owners and Management.
"Re Searching For Products as a Customer" The one reply that sums up how difficult it is for customers to navigate our marketplace is from Fuzzy Felosarix Posted 16th August 2019. {Quote} "It's all about the customer experience, once you get them here. That means not only meeting their expectations, but exceeding them. You can't do the latter if you don't take care of the former first.

This is what makes me kinds nuts, here. Even though the site needs to stand out from competitors, being different just to be different does not cut it. Customer expectations aren't just about the order and fulfillment process. They start with what customers encounter when they reach the site.

How many customers arrive here for their 'first time ever' online shopping experience? I suspect not many; most probably already have some experience with ecommerce. So their expectations begin with what they've already encountered in that regard.

Speaking for myself (and I buy a lot online), the first thing I notice is organization. If a site isn't organized in a way that makes sense/makes things easy to find, I won't even bother trying to make it work, unless they are the sole source for what I need. I will pay more somewhere else for ease of the shopping experience, because a poorly organized site makes me suspicious about their ability to even fulfill my order. Disorganization up front probably means chaos inside the business.

That said, even an 'organized' site doesn't always make for the best shopping experience, because it matters how the site is organized, not merely that it has some semblance of organization to it. For shoppers, that means things need to be familiar enough for them to find their way without having to experiment, or click on things without a clear idea of what will happen (and fulfillment of that expectation.)

When I look at the Zazzle home page, what I see is a site that suffers from not being able to step outside their own knowledge of the place. As a designer with direct contact with some of my customers, I've had to do a lot of coaching with a buyer to walk them through finding and ordering something here. If they can't do it on their own right from the start, I have to wonder if it's them, or a problem with the site. Knowing my customer isn't stupid and has shopped online before, I'm going with the latter issue.

Yes, we've all heard about how smart Zazzle's shoppers are, how they can figure things out, etc. But that's putting it all on the site's visitors. They shouldn't have to figure it out. It should be easy for them, from start to finish.

"What do you want to make today?" I'm not here to 'make' anything. Oh, it's a search box - which I know only because of the magnifying glass icon. What's wrong with "Search"? One word, instead of making me read seven that just confuse things.

So I click in the box, and I get a drop-down. That immediately makes me think that I can't type anything in the box, that I need to drill down through the displayed subject instead. Whoops. If something looks a text box, I'm not expecting it to act like a button/drop-down list - and it shouldn't for that very reason. You've immediately defied my expectations in a way that doesn't enhance my experience. Drop-down boxes traditionally have an arrow at one end, so that you get a visual cue to open the drop-down. So I'm baffled by the behavior of this box right from the beginning.

Hovering over "Products" in the drop-down menu is the only item that gives me some clue what it's about, via the window that appears to the right. As a new shopper, "Designers", "Makers", and "Collections" mean nothing to me. I don't care about them - I just want to search for something.

Starting with "Products", I don't see what I'm looking for in the window, so I click on the "See All Results" button. That's an extra click; why not show me all the top-level categories in that first window, so I can get there more quickly? (And "see all results"? I haven't actually searched for anything yet, why the word "results"? I'm about to find out...)

Welp, that wasn't helpful. I'm no closer to being able to search or seeing product categories than I was from the start. In fact, I would have been better off going through the small print, easy to miss product category labels below that "what do you want to make" button, disguised as a text box. Remember - I don't know that I can type in the search box, because I was given this drop-down, supposedly to ease navigation.

So what am I seeing? Results for "" - now I think I've screwed up somehow. Definitely not having a great experience so far. What to do? I've got a bunch of blue buttons, but none of them really speak to me...

Oh, here we go - a "Refine by category" drop-down. Now we're getting somewhere. So I click on "Men's T-Shirts."

Gah. More blue boxes, still no search box. If I made it this far as a new shopper, chances are I'm ready to call it quits.

That's just one example of how frustrating the site can be to navigate. I'll assume you don't want to hear more." {End of Quote}


I hope Zazzle Management reads this detailed important message! Thankyou for your time Jilly See
Topic: What do you want to make today?
orientcourt Posted: Sunday, August 18, 2019 6:57:38 PM
This Message is for Zazzles Owners and Management.
"Re Searching For Products as a Customer" The one reply that sums up how difficult it is for customers to navigate our marketplace is from Fuzzy Felosarix Posted 16th August 2019. {Quote} "It's all about the customer experience, once you get them here. That means not only meeting their expectations, but exceeding them. You can't do the latter if you don't take care of the former first.

This is what makes me kinds nuts, here. Even though the site needs to stand out from competitors, being different just to be different does not cut it. Customer expectations aren't just about the order and fulfillment process. They start with what customers encounter when they reach the site.

How many customers arrive here for their 'first time ever' online shopping experience? I suspect not many; most probably already have some experience with ecommerce. So their expectations begin with what they've already encountered in that regard.

Speaking for myself (and I buy a lot online), the first thing I notice is organization. If a site isn't organized in a way that makes sense/makes things easy to find, I won't even bother trying to make it work, unless they are the sole source for what I need. I will pay more somewhere else for ease of the shopping experience, because a poorly organized site makes me suspicious about their ability to even fulfill my order. Disorganization up front probably means chaos inside the business.

That said, even an 'organized' site doesn't always make for the best shopping experience, because it matters how the site is organized, not merely that it has some semblance of organization to it. For shoppers, that means things need to be familiar enough for them to find their way without having to experiment, or click on things without a clear idea of what will happen (and fulfillment of that expectation.)

When I look at the Zazzle home page, what I see is a site that suffers from not being able to step outside their own knowledge of the place. As a designer with direct contact with some of my customers, I've had to do a lot of coaching with a buyer to walk them through finding and ordering something here. If they can't do it on their own right from the start, I have to wonder if it's them, or a problem with the site. Knowing my customer isn't stupid and has shopped online before, I'm going with the latter issue.

Yes, we've all heard about how smart Zazzle's shoppers are, how they can figure things out, etc. But that's putting it all on the site's visitors. They shouldn't have to figure it out. It should be easy for them, from start to finish.

"What do you want to make today?" I'm not here to 'make' anything. Oh, it's a search box - which I know only because of the magnifying glass icon. What's wrong with "Search"? One word, instead of making me read seven that just confuse things.

So I click in the box, and I get a drop-down. That immediately makes me think that I can't type anything in the box, that I need to drill down through the displayed subject instead. Whoops. If something looks a text box, I'm not expecting it to act like a button/drop-down list - and it shouldn't for that very reason. You've immediately defied my expectations in a way that doesn't enhance my experience. Drop-down boxes traditionally have an arrow at one end, so that you get a visual cue to open the drop-down. So I'm baffled by the behavior of this box right from the beginning.

Hovering over "Products" in the drop-down menu is the only item that gives me some clue what it's about, via the window that appears to the right. As a new shopper, "Designers", "Makers", and "Collections" mean nothing to me. I don't care about them - I just want to search for something.

Starting with "Products", I don't see what I'm looking for in the window, so I click on the "See All Results" button. That's an extra click; why not show me all the top-level categories in that first window, so I can get there more quickly? (And "see all results"? I haven't actually searched for anything yet, why the word "results"? I'm about to find out...)

Welp, that wasn't helpful. I'm no closer to being able to search or seeing product categories than I was from the start. In fact, I would have been better off going through the small print, easy to miss product category labels below that "what do you want to make" button, disguised as a text box. Remember - I don't know that I can type in the search box, because I was given this drop-down, supposedly to ease navigation.

So what am I seeing? Results for "" - now I think I've screwed up somehow. Definitely not having a great experience so far. What to do? I've got a bunch of blue buttons, but none of them really speak to me...

Oh, here we go - a "Refine by category" drop-down. Now we're getting somewhere. So I click on "Men's T-Shirts."

Gah. More blue boxes, still no search box. If I made it this far as a new shopper, chances are I'm ready to call it quits.

That's just one example of how frustrating the site can be to navigate. I'll assume you don't want to hear more." {End of Quote}


I hope Zazzle Management reads this detailed important message! Thankyou for your time Jilly See