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Topic: Pinterest Pins Pulling from Etsy Photos
lioncrusher Posted: Saturday, January 18, 2020 11:32:38 AM
I have had an ongoing issue with some of my artwork being used on Pinterest, with the link going to some blog or website that I am not affiliated with and has nothing to do with my artwork. This kind of thing is unfortunately common on Pinterest. If these pins are really pointing to a website that is unrelated to the image, I suggest reporting those pins that are "duping" people with fake images. You can click on the three dots on any pin and click Report. If you happen to know the original creator of the image, you can notify the too and they can report it as a copyright infringement.

However, there is something else to consider. Many people use fancy mockups for their pins, rather than the default images. The fancy mockups are more attractive than the default images Zazzle gives you. This is something that I do to. I make a mockup of a product, for example a mousepad on a wooden computer desk with a computer, and use that image to point to my mousepad collection, for example. The image on Pinterest is not the image on Zazzle, but it is still leading to the same product. Here is an example of one of my own pins where I use a fancy mockup: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/851602610775498143

Topic: Pinterest Pins Pulling from Etsy Photos
lioncrusher Posted: Saturday, January 18, 2020 11:32:38 AM
I have had an ongoing issue with some of my artwork being used on Pinterest, with the link going to some blog or website that I am not affiliated with and has nothing to do with my artwork. This kind of thing is unfortunately common on Pinterest. If these pins are really pointing to a website that is unrelated to the image, I suggest reporting those pins that are "duping" people with fake images. You can click on the three dots on any pin and click Report. If you happen to know the original creator of the image, you can notify the too and they can report it as a copyright infringement.

However, there is something else to consider. Many people use fancy mockups for their pins, rather than the default images. The fancy mockups are more attractive than the default images Zazzle gives you. This is something that I do to. I make a mockup of a product, for example a mousepad on a wooden computer desk with a computer, and use that image to point to my mousepad collection, for example. The image on Pinterest is not the image on Zazzle, but it is still leading to the same product. Here is an example of one of my own pins where I use a fancy mockup: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/851602610775498143

Topic: Second Content
lioncrusher Posted: Wednesday, January 15, 2020 9:09:13 AM
Quote:

And let me just add... you, the shopper, are the one who had to pay for the candy bar not the person in line in front of you, not the cashier, not the store manager.

This is common sense and common practice... you want extras? that is fine, you pay for them. Manager wants to offer freebies? let manager pay for them.


Yes, exactly. If I want that candy bar, I pay for it. Businesses that do offer "free stuff" actually have two ways of compensating for it. One is to temporarily increase their prices to compensate. And the other is the corporation pays for it, and usually writes it off as a business expense.

Businesses that give you free stuff like pens, magnets, calendars and the such always write those off as business expenses, and they get a tax break for it. The companies that make those items still get paid, though. Even though Company XYZ is giving away magnets, the magnet company still gets paid 100% by Company XYZ; the magnet manufacturer will not give their magnets away for free.

In addition, restaurants that offer "free" stuff are not really giving you that for free. It is all accounted for in the price of the meal, it's just you don't get an itemized breakdown of your meal (usually). And if it really is for free (kids under 7 eat free on Wednesdays), again, company write-off, or higher prices to compensate.

But in general, if a customer is purchasing something, they have to pay for it.
Topic: Second Content
lioncrusher Posted: Wednesday, January 15, 2020 9:09:13 AM
Quote:

And let me just add... you, the shopper, are the one who had to pay for the candy bar not the person in line in front of you, not the cashier, not the store manager.

This is common sense and common practice... you want extras? that is fine, you pay for them. Manager wants to offer freebies? let manager pay for them.


Yes, exactly. If I want that candy bar, I pay for it. Businesses that do offer "free stuff" actually have two ways of compensating for it. One is to temporarily increase their prices to compensate. And the other is the corporation pays for it, and usually writes it off as a business expense.

Businesses that give you free stuff like pens, magnets, calendars and the such always write those off as business expenses, and they get a tax break for it. The companies that make those items still get paid, though. Even though Company XYZ is giving away magnets, the magnet company still gets paid 100% by Company XYZ; the magnet manufacturer will not give their magnets away for free.

In addition, restaurants that offer "free" stuff are not really giving you that for free. It is all accounted for in the price of the meal, it's just you don't get an itemized breakdown of your meal (usually). And if it really is for free (kids under 7 eat free on Wednesdays), again, company write-off, or higher prices to compensate.

But in general, if a customer is purchasing something, they have to pay for it.
Topic: Second Content
lioncrusher Posted: Wednesday, January 15, 2020 9:09:13 AM
Quote:

And let me just add... you, the shopper, are the one who had to pay for the candy bar not the person in line in front of you, not the cashier, not the store manager.

This is common sense and common practice... you want extras? that is fine, you pay for them. Manager wants to offer freebies? let manager pay for them.


Yes, exactly. If I want that candy bar, I pay for it. Businesses that do offer "free stuff" actually have two ways of compensating for it. One is to temporarily increase their prices to compensate. And the other is the corporation pays for it, and usually writes it off as a business expense.

Businesses that give you free stuff like pens, magnets, calendars and the such always write those off as business expenses, and they get a tax break for it. The companies that make those items still get paid, though. Even though Company XYZ is giving away magnets, the magnet company still gets paid 100% by Company XYZ; the magnet manufacturer will not give their magnets away for free.

In addition, restaurants that offer "free" stuff are not really giving you that for free. It is all accounted for in the price of the meal, it's just you don't get an itemized breakdown of your meal (usually). And if it really is for free (kids under 7 eat free on Wednesdays), again, company write-off, or higher prices to compensate.

But in general, if a customer is purchasing something, they have to pay for it.