How many designs and products to earn $100 per month? 3 pages: 1 [2] 3
Posted: Tuesday, April 24, 2018 9:15:47 AM
Each person and store(s) are very different. I agree with having great designs and any other suggestions, keep going. I can range around $10-$40 a month. Sometimes, I can get to around $40 in any given month with around 6 sales, then go the opposite of around $10-$15 with just 6 sales. It's all up and down.
Posted: Tuesday, April 24, 2018 11:10:06 PM
jdspenguins wrote:
Each person and store(s) are very different. I agree with having great designs and any other suggestions, keep going. I can range around $10-$40 a month. Sometimes, I can get to around $40 in any given month with around 6 sales, then go the opposite of around $10-$15 with just 6 sales. It's all up and down.


Is that from 4800 products?

How many unique designs do you have?
Posted: Wednesday, April 25, 2018 7:06:13 AM
Another way to look at it rather than picking an arbitrary number like $100/month is to look at what you are getting.

Would you be happy getting your electricity bill paid every month? Or cell bill? This helps a little to put it in context I think. Chances are these are less than $100 but more newbies would say that would be great.

Back to your question on number of products. We got started here on a lark with a political bumper sticker I made mostly as a joke. that was really our only product. One day a month later it took off. We made $50 in one day. So it is possible to have just one design that people want. But that is the exception.

Part of the answer also involves what you are selling and what your royalty rate is. You'll make maybe 25¢ on a postcard and maybe $25 on a canvass.

Our experience is that you can better your chances with many products and good designs on products.

We have around 100,000 but we've been at this for many years.

Be the tortoise and not the hare and you will do well. https://passingthru.com/making-money-online-be-the-tortoise-not-the-hare/
Posted: Wednesday, April 25, 2018 11:26:18 AM
You have great article and advice there, @Peter Wuebker. I agree with your idea of 'Be the tortoise and not the hare and you will do well'. I love your website, thank you for sharing your Zazzle experience Smile
Posted: Wednesday, April 25, 2018 1:53:19 PM
Peter Wuebker wrote:
Another way to look at it rather than picking an arbitrary number like $100/month is to look at what you are getting.

Would you be happy getting your electricity bill paid every month? Or cell bill? This helps a little to put it in context I think. Chances are these are less than $100 but more newbies would say that would be great.
/


I picked $100 per month because firstly it is a nice round number. Secondly it didn't sound very much money and a big ask to achieve, that is until I started hearing people's responses here. I could have just as easily asked the same question with $20 or $50 per month.

Of course any earnings are better than nothing at all, but it depends on how much time and effort I need to put in to achieve them and whether my time is better spent elsewhere.

I can see that things can start very slow and gradually snowball over time, So I can't start making judgements on future earnings, after the first week and earnings of just 22 cents.
Posted: Wednesday, April 25, 2018 4:02:47 PM
If you made 22 cents after just being here one week, you are doing great.
Posted: Wednesday, April 25, 2018 11:07:32 PM
I AM NEWBIE BUT I ALSO DIDNT GET ANY SALES STILL , HOPE IT WILL GET IT SOON
?
Posted: Thursday, April 26, 2018 4:27:28 AM
The more designs you have, the higher your chances of being seen on the site. However, having said that, BEING SEEN, COMING UP in Zazzle's search engines is paramount.

Without being seen, your chances are slim and none, no matter how many designs you have.

I have about 1.400 and I am nowhere near earning $100 a month. There is virtually no info on how to improve your showings in Zazzle's search. Those members who have a method will never share it. I don't blame them.

It is a tough game. I have a listing fit every time I make a sale. However, it seems to have little effect.

Not sure Zazzle is a viable model for making a steady income for most.

That's my take.
Posted: Thursday, April 26, 2018 5:15:50 AM
If (and that is a big if) you can come up with designs that sell you can rank higher in the searches and if you can turn a best selling design into a bestselling line of products you can make consistent monthly income here without having to have 100,000 products.

Once your design sells it becomes what they call evergreen... which means that it will not be hidden and it will come up higher in relevant searches the more it sells the better the visibility.

Now if you can take your design that sold and add it to more products it just may turn into a steady stream of sales.

I have a few designs I have built up this way which are now doing okay and finally after 3 years bringing in a regular (if small) income and allowing me to now focus on promoting the designs I already have instead of using all my time creating new ones. I still add new stuff but now I promote more and create less.

I usually have about 5000 products in the marketplace. over the 3 years I have been able to cull the duds and improve my designs.

always learning and having fun... it still doesn't feel like work. if it did I would probably stop because the income isn't that good...yet.



Posted: Thursday, April 26, 2018 6:32:55 AM
Chet Dembeck wrote:
The more designs you have, the higher your chances of being seen on the site. However, having said that, BEING SEEN, COMING UP in Zazzle's search engines is paramount.

Without being seen, your chances are slim and none, no matter how many designs you have.

I have about 1.400 and I am nowhere near earning $100 a month. There is virtually no info on how to improve your showings in Zazzle's search. Those members who have a method will never share it. I don't blame them.

It is a tough game. I have a listing fit every time I make a sale. However, it seems to have little effect.

Not sure Zazzle is a viable model for making a steady income for most.

That's my take.


Am I right that you have 1400 products, not designs?

1400 designs is a huge number, while 1400 products is not so much and easy to get to.
Posted: Thursday, April 26, 2018 6:35:41 AM
Peter Wuebker wrote:
Another way to look at it rather than picking an arbitrary number like $100/month is to look at what you are getting.

Would you be happy getting your electricity bill paid every month? Or cell bill? This helps a little to put it in context I think. Chances are these are less than $100 but more newbies would say that would be great.

Back to your question on number of products. We got started here on a lark with a political bumper sticker I made mostly as a joke. that was really our only product. One day a month later it took off. We made $50 in one day. So it is possible to have just one design that people want. But that is the exception.

Part of the answer also involves what you are selling and what your royalty rate is. You'll make maybe 25¢ on a postcard and maybe $25 on a canvass.

Our experience is that you can better your chances with many products and good designs on products.

We have around 100,000 but we've been at this for many years.

Be the tortoise and not the hare and you will do well. https://passingthru.com/making-money-online-be-the-tortoise-not-the-hare/


In your tortoise article (written September 2015) you stated that you had 15,000 products and 4000 designs, while here you state you now have 100,000 products. Has the momentum in earnings growth continued to increase since that article?

Has earnings growth matched your sharp increase in products?

Posted: Thursday, April 26, 2018 8:57:44 AM
If this info helps, in my last post I mentioned that I have around 5000 products and I just counted my unique designs I have just over 800 of them, I would say maybe 50% of those have sold at least once and about 15 that sell repeatedly on many different products. Just this year since the Christmas Holiday season I have been getting paid every month instead of sporadically like I was before that.

As Peter was saying my earnings from Z help to pay my phone and internet bills and every little bit counts! This is not my only stream of income though.
Posted: Thursday, April 26, 2018 9:13:45 AM
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
If this info helps, in my last post I mentioned that I have around 5000 products and I just counted my unique designs I have just over 800 of them, I would say maybe 50% of those have sold at least once and about 15 that sell repeatedly on many different products. Just this year since the Christmas Holiday season I have been getting paid every month instead of sporadically like I was before that.

As Peter was saying my earnings from Z help to pay my phone and internet bills and every little bit counts! This is not my only stream of income though.


I think the 800 designs is more significant than the 5000 products. A newbie can easily knock out 5000 products using Quick Product Create from just a small number of designs. But I doubt that will result in many sales.
Posted: Thursday, April 26, 2018 10:20:08 AM
Andrew Michael wrote:
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
If this info helps, in my last post I mentioned that I have around 5000 products and I just counted my unique designs I have just over 800 of them, I would say maybe 50% of those have sold at least once and about 15 that sell repeatedly on many different products. Just this year since the Christmas Holiday season I have been getting paid every month instead of sporadically like I was before that.

As Peter was saying my earnings from Z help to pay my phone and internet bills and every little bit counts! This is not my only stream of income though.


I think the 800 designs is more significant than the 5000 products. A newbie can easily knock out 5000 products using Quick Product Create from just a small number of designs. But I doubt that will result in many sales.


Makes sense to me!
Posted: Thursday, April 26, 2018 10:21:46 AM

The key strategy to have sales and targeted sales is
to really learn how to pick the right low competitive
keywords.

The kayword tagging is great too but the most ignored
these days where people don't know is keyword research
within the whole internet world.

If we master getting those less competitive keywords
we will get lots of sales.Idea
Posted: Thursday, April 26, 2018 10:59:27 AM
JUDERM wrote:

The key strategy to have sales and targeted sales is
to really learn how to pick the right low competitive
keywords.

The kayword tagging is great too but the most ignored
these days where people don't know is keyword research
within the whole internet world.

If we master getting those less competitive keywords
we will get lots of sales.Idea


as long as the less competitive keywords are actually being searched that will work... It would be nice to know what people are searching for. I fear that most shoppers use common keywords like colors and style...

ie: looking for blue cat designs they probably enter "blue cat designs"

not ideal keywords for us... I have tried the the uncommon tags and can't really tell if that helps or not.
Posted: Thursday, April 26, 2018 3:56:06 PM
Hi Shelli Fitzpatrick, I found this out by researching
and learning from a few of my internet marketing source.Smile

We have to get the LESS COMPETITIVE KEYWORDS and
add them to our Zazzle products' titles and descriptions.

Finding them is very complicated but if we do so, we can
just seat back and start receiving and earning passive income.

There are criteria to take note that we have to consider before
we spot these golden keywords or LESS COMPETITIVE KEYWORDS.

We have to investigate the top 10 sites of the 1st page of Google
that our chosen keyword ranks. Then find out if at least one
of the site have these criteria below:

- trust flow is less than 3
- external backlinks at least about less than 100
- site's age is about 3 years old or younger
- word count of the article should have about less than 1000 words
- and more

If your target keyword have this information above, chances are your products'
URL will rank high in Google. The keyword you have chosen
is LESS COMPETITIVE.

There are keyword tools that show this information and give us right
away the LESS COMPETITIVE KEYWORDS very easily.

It could be that this is one of the secrets that most high sellers don't tell us.

I hope this will add up to our knowledge by applying them in the
process of creating our products which will hopefully help us sell more.Idea

Posted: Saturday, May 05, 2018 9:13:46 AM

Just got my 3rd sale, another postcard, since joining 3 weeks ago! Laughing

My total earnings now stand at $0.42. Who said this wasn't a get rich quick scheme?



Posted: Saturday, May 05, 2018 10:28:23 AM
Andrew Michael wrote:
My total earnings now stand at $0.42. Who said this wasn't a get rich quick scheme?

I stand corrected. Happy
Posted: Saturday, May 05, 2018 11:20:15 AM
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
[quote=JUDERM]
as long as the less competitive keywords are actually being searched that will work... It would be nice to know what people are searching for. I fear that most shoppers use common keywords like colors and style...

ie: looking for blue cat designs they probably enter "blue cat designs"

not ideal keywords for us... I have tried the the uncommon tags and can't really tell if that helps or not.

Less common vs. less competitive -

- blue cat, 2 million searches/day, common, competitive
- blue kitten, 1 million searches/day, common, less competitive
- blue feline, 500,000 searches/day, less common, less competitive
- blue Felis catus, 10 searches/day, uncommon, not competitive

I think that's what Juderm is trying to get at. All those numbers are made up, by the way. Not sure I would use "feline," but as an example, at 500,000 searches/day, that's plenty to get sales, if we rank high enough.

Keyword research is important, and I don't do enough of it. If I was just starting out, I think I'd reverse my process - think of things to design, do research, then design based on research. Instead, I pretty much decided what I wanted to design, and now I'm backing into keywords in some cases.



Posted: Saturday, May 05, 2018 1:26:19 PM
RoyK_is_a_She wrote:
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
[quote=JUDERM]
as long as the less competitive keywords are actually being searched that will work... It would be nice to know what people are searching for. I fear that most shoppers use common keywords like colors and style...

ie: looking for blue cat designs they probably enter "blue cat designs"

not ideal keywords for us... I have tried the the uncommon tags and can't really tell if that helps or not.

Less common vs. less competitive -

- blue cat, 2 million searches/day, common, competitive
- blue kitten, 1 million searches/day, common, less competitive
- blue feline, 500,000 searches/day, less common, less competitive
- blue Felis catus, 10 searches/day, uncommon, not competitive

I think that's what Juderm is trying to get at. All those numbers are made up, by the way. Not sure I would use "feline," but as an example, at 500,000 searches/day, that's plenty to get sales, if we rank high enough.

Keyword research is important, and I don't do enough of it. If I was just starting out, I think I'd reverse my process - think of things to design, do research, then design based on research. Instead, I pretty much decided what I wanted to design, and now I'm backing into keywords in some cases.





This is great and all, but if I want a blue cat wearing a sombrero and playing a banjo, that's what I'm typing in the search bar.

If I'm looking for invitations with yellow flowers, I'm looking up yellow flowers.

If I'm looking for a SPECIFIC strain of flower, I might type in the botanical name, but only if searching specific. Otherwise I want the prettiest yellow-ish flower with the text elements I need.
Posted: Saturday, May 05, 2018 2:58:43 PM
RGebbiePhoto wrote:
RoyK_is_a_She wrote:
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
[quote=JUDERM]
as long as the less competitive keywords are actually being searched that will work... It would be nice to know what people are searching for. I fear that most shoppers use common keywords like colors and style...

ie: looking for blue cat designs they probably enter "blue cat designs"

not ideal keywords for us... I have tried the the uncommon tags and can't really tell if that helps or not.

Less common vs. less competitive -

- blue cat, 2 million searches/day, common, competitive
- blue kitten, 1 million searches/day, common, less competitive
- blue feline, 500,000 searches/day, less common, less competitive
- blue Felis catus, 10 searches/day, uncommon, not competitive

I think that's what Juderm is trying to get at. All those numbers are made up, by the way. Not sure I would use "feline," but as an example, at 500,000 searches/day, that's plenty to get sales, if we rank high enough.

Keyword research is important, and I don't do enough of it. If I was just starting out, I think I'd reverse my process - think of things to design, do research, then design based on research. Instead, I pretty much decided what I wanted to design, and now I'm backing into keywords in some cases.





This is great and all, but if I want a blue cat wearing a sombrero and playing a banjo, that's what I'm typing in the search bar.

If I'm looking for invitations with yellow flowers, I'm looking up yellow flowers.

If I'm looking for a SPECIFIC strain of flower, I might type in the botanical name, but only if searching specific. Otherwise I want the prettiest yellow-ish flower with the text elements I need.


agree...

Once I did a little internal research by checking the tags of all the top hits on the first page of Zazzle in any given random search. I did this because it seemed like all my long string phrase tags were not very effective in getting me views. What I found was surprising to me because 8 to 9 out of 10 of the top hits ( in the first two rows) on the first page on any random search I tried had simple and common mostly one word tags. like for example...

designs with blue cats had tags like blue,cat,cute,animal,pet,meow,furry,

and yes some of them didn't even have all ten tags...

That is when I started changing the way I tag things and I did see an uptick in sales. I can't prove that this is why but... hey.

@Juderm
The best way I have found to rank high in Google searches is to have a G+ account and share things to it.
Posted: Sunday, May 06, 2018 3:15:34 AM
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
designs with blue cats had tags like blue,cat,cute,animal,pet,meow,furry,

What you found might be more a reflection of how most people tag than of what works best. It also might often reflect popular designs taking a while to get there, and that you're seeing older products from a time when we weren't limited to just 10 tags.
Posted: Sunday, May 06, 2018 7:42:29 AM
deemac1 wrote:

To make it harder to judge....only US sales count towards pro levels. Without that I could possibly reach silver in the next couple years. With it.....probably not in my lifetime.
d

And I don't understand the reasoning for that??
Zazzle and I both make $$ on overseas sales, why shouldn't it count
toward the next level?? Money is money!
Would sure be a morale booster Happy Love Love
Maybe an Admin will "enlighten" me. Idea
Posted: Sunday, May 06, 2018 9:24:50 AM
Al Mount wrote:
deemac1 wrote:

To make it harder to judge....only US sales count towards pro levels. Without that I could possibly reach silver in the next couple years. With it.....probably not in my lifetime.
d

And I don't understand the reasoning for that??
Zazzle and I both make $$ on overseas sales, why shouldn't it count
toward the next level?? Money is money!
Would sure be a morale booster Happy Love Love
Maybe an Admin will "enlighten" me. Idea

It's something periodically questioned, including by me, but no one from Zazzle, as far as I know, has ever explained it.
Posted: Sunday, May 06, 2018 10:47:44 AM
Colorwash wrote:
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
designs with blue cats had tags like blue,cat,cute,animal,pet,meow,furry,

What you found might be more a reflection of how most people tag than of what works best. It also might often reflect popular designs taking a while to get there, and that you're seeing older products from a time when we weren't limited to just 10 tags.


could be, but it happened over and over on random searches
Posted: Sunday, May 06, 2018 12:01:44 PM
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
Colorwash wrote:
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
designs with blue cats had tags like blue,cat,cute,animal,pet,meow,furry,

What you found might be more a reflection of how most people tag than of what works best. It also might often reflect popular designs taking a while to get there, and that you're seeing older products from a time when we weren't limited to just 10 tags.


could be, but it happened over and over on random searches

Thinking about it further, I bet most people simply don't bother with phrases, and maybe that's why the searches bring up mostly those who don't use them. It's hard to say. I sell stuff that mostly uses phrases.
Posted: Sunday, May 06, 2018 5:37:48 PM
Colorwash wrote:
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
Colorwash wrote:
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
designs with blue cats had tags like blue,cat,cute,animal,pet,meow,furry,

What you found might be more a reflection of how most people tag than of what works best. It also might often reflect popular designs taking a while to get there, and that you're seeing older products from a time when we weren't limited to just 10 tags.


could be, but it happened over and over on random searches

Thinking about it further, I bet most people simply don't bother with phrases, and maybe that's why the searches bring up mostly those who don't use them. It's hard to say. I sell stuff that mostly uses phrases.


It could be single words being picked out of your phrase in which case I guess it doesn’t matter and we can stuff our tags after all. 🤓
Posted: Monday, May 07, 2018 3:15:58 AM
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
Colorwash wrote:
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
Colorwash wrote:
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
designs with blue cats had tags like blue,cat,cute,animal,pet,meow,furry,

What you found might be more a reflection of how most people tag than of what works best. It also might often reflect popular designs taking a while to get there, and that you're seeing older products from a time when we weren't limited to just 10 tags.


could be, but it happened over and over on random searches

Thinking about it further, I bet most people simply don't bother with phrases, and maybe that's why the searches bring up mostly those who don't use them. It's hard to say. I sell stuff that mostly uses phrases.


It could be single words being picked out of your phrase in which case I guess it doesn’t matter and we can stuff our tags after all. 🤓

I don't ever indulge in tag stuffing.
Posted: Monday, May 07, 2018 4:18:51 AM
RGebbiePhoto wrote:
RoyK_is_a_She wrote:
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
[quote=JUDERM]
as long as the less competitive keywords are actually being searched that will work... It would be nice to know what people are searching for. I fear that most shoppers use common keywords like colors and style...

ie: looking for blue cat designs they probably enter "blue cat designs"

not ideal keywords for us... I have tried the the uncommon tags and can't really tell if that helps or not.

Less common vs. less competitive -

- blue cat, 2 million searches/day, common, competitive
- blue kitten, 1 million searches/day, common, less competitive
- blue feline, 500,000 searches/day, less common, less competitive
- blue Felis catus, 10 searches/day, uncommon, not competitive

I think that's what Juderm is trying to get at. All those numbers are made up, by the way. Not sure I would use "feline," but as an example, at 500,000 searches/day, that's plenty to get sales, if we rank high enough.

Keyword research is important, and I don't do enough of it. If I was just starting out, I think I'd reverse my process - think of things to design, do research, then design based on research. Instead, I pretty much decided what I wanted to design, and now I'm backing into keywords in some cases.


This is great and all, but if I want a blue cat wearing a sombrero and playing a banjo, that's what I'm typing in the search bar.

If I'm looking for invitations with yellow flowers, I'm looking up yellow flowers.

If I'm looking for a SPECIFIC strain of flower, I might type in the botanical name, but only if searching specific. Otherwise I want the prettiest yellow-ish flower with the text elements I need.

Which is all fine and one way to do it. But if I'm going to be on page 16 of results with "blue cat" in 2 million searches and page 2 with "blue kitten" in 1 million, I'll take the latter. Little fish, big pond; big fish, little pond. Different strategies.

For those designs appearing on page 1 with short tags, high sales, presumably, got them that placement. But was it tags or promotions outside of Z or a combination or something else that got them those sales? We don't know.
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