Hello everyone! New user looking for feedback...
Posted: Saturday, June 08, 2019 8:25:36 PM
Hi guys, I'm Malady, an artist who's just starting to get her designs out there. I don't know if this would be the right place, but I'm just opening this topic to see if anyone could provide criticism! No pressure to do so of course, but any help is appreciated.

I have looked over the guidelines and tips for new users already so I am aware of some issues I have currently. I'm slowly working on these to the best of my ability, and through trial and error I'm still learning.

Anyway, here is my store: https://www.zazzle.com/store/monstlore

And here are some of the things I am aware of currently:

-Need more variety in products! I have more stories and characters in the works, but art takes time so I might not be able to address this as quickly as I had hoped.

-Make things easier to navigate/organize. I will be making collections for every character(s) group as needed.

-Expand my target audience a little. I am focusing on PG-13 designs (and I hope I am labeling correctly!) but I also want to make a character or a series of them that will appeal to a general audience at some point. Again, ideas are in the works, but implementing them takes time.

I have a separate issue with allowing people to customize.
Now, with this I have, for example, generally limited some options to vivid printing because the white is meant to stand out on the design. I will be doing so because I want to show the best example of my designs, but I do want to keep customization open otherwise.

However, this brings another question: should I allow ALL customization and reduce my designs to a single listing for t-shirts? Or should I continue to have "options" in the forms of, say, focusing on alternate filters as a recommendation but then allowing further customization? I may be complicating things a bit too much, so I would really like some help in this area as well.

I read that customization is very important concerning Zazzle, but at the same time I like being able to narrow down options for customers so they can see what I see, if that makes sense. Even so, I want to address this somehow but I'm not sure where to start or if I'm limiting customers too much by focusing on certain styles.

If anyone has anything to add, please do! Sorry for the lengthy post lol, I like ironing out all the wrinkles in a sense.
Posted: Saturday, June 08, 2019 9:18:13 PM
-.-

Customization is a strength of zazzle so allowing as much customization as possible is a good idea in my opinion. Customer see what you see when they open the product page so they are always aware of the designers intention and design choices and by reloading the page can always return to them.

It is your pride and your image of yourself as an artist where you draw the line for customization. Some want to control what the customer can buy as much as possible.

I'm in the camp, let the customer loose and if the customer chooses to uglify it beyond believe, let her/him. (S)He has a pretty accurate preview and therefor has a pretty good idea what (s)he chooses to buy. A little ugly makes life interesting, anyways.

Laughing




Customization is big like adding an initial or a name to the design or some inspirational quote that rings with the recipient of the gift, so offering additional products with text templates is always a good idea and your store is lacking in that respect at the moment.

-Love-
Posted: Sunday, June 09, 2019 1:45:48 AM
Welcome Malady, nice to meet you.

Feel well your pain in regard to the time needed to learn and make it right, I've the same slow approach (let apart the time needed for the artworks themselves). It may be frustrating at the beginning, but you will be thankful of your choice later on, when you have learned about all the possibilities, the tricks and hacks, the no-gos and the best path to head on, so you can start filling your store properly with quality designs (the famous quality over quantity) and don't have to redo all the old stuff you published with less knowledge.

I love your style and works, especially the mug-artwork (really beautifully drawn). Gives a refreshing touch of color to the wedding-babyshower-trendypattern dominated Zazzle landscape. The idea of creating collections by character is also perfect (I would also create collections with matching product sets, e.g. partner look shirts, mug sets of your different characters, blanket-and-pillow sets etc), and I enjoyed reading the character résumé within the design description (I guess, not many will read the description, though).

What you did wrong in my opinion, is to not allow customization on the mug (and completely block the designer access). Zazzle is all about personalization and customization, that's their huge strength and what makes them different from the vast POD competition. Zazzle's prices are on the upper end, so you want to make sure to give your customer base a little incentive to spend a few bucks more, what you will achieve allowing as much personalization as possible. In the case of the mug, I would add a monogram and/or overlapping name text field template on the right/back side, with a font and colors that match well with your artwork, so buyers can easily personalize their mug.

I've seen you've used a transparent PNG on the shirts and assume you did the same on the mugs (can't access the design, so can't tell for sure). The artworks look like vector drawings to me (drawn and/or vectorized in Illustrator, Corel Draw or other graphic software), though, with solid colors, except the painted background on the shirt design (symbolizing blossoms I guess). In the case of vector originals, I highly recommend to export them from your graphic software into a (vector) PDF and upload the PDF. That way you don't have to worry about pixels and dpi and can resize your work at will within the designer without any quality loss (you'll always get sharp and crispy results). If you want to add painted backgrounds (such as on the shirt), made in Photoshop or similar image editing software, you can save them separately as transparent PNG at a large resolution/size (perhaps 8000 pixel in size to cover up to large blankets, or 10400/11000 pixel for king sized duvet covers and wall tapestry) and combine them together within the designer. That way you can freely mix raster backgrounds (JPG or PNG) and vector (PDF) drawings, and always have highest quality results on the drawings. Don't mix them in your PDFs, keep the freely resizable vectors separated from the raster images subject to resolution and pixel sizes.

In regard to PG-13 and R-rated works, I suggest to put them in specific categories and to create a category image that mentions the rating and tells the buyers to set the content filter accordingly. If I remember well, you need to be registered to set the filter to OFF, and if you put PG/R rated content in collections, the whole collection is rated accordingly and only visible if the filter is correctly set (could be wrong, tho).

There is a lot more to say, but that could fill a book. Check out the forums, especially the Feedback and Create forums, there is a LOT of information about practically anything. And always feel free to ask, we have quite a few really nice and helpful designers and mods here ready to help.

Last but not least: don't expect quick results. Zazzle has a HUGE marketplace and you compete with thousands of designers, many of them skilled and established, and millions of designs. The best way to succeed on Zazzle is to build up your own customer and follower base and to promote your stores. The more people browse your stores and buy, the better you get listed and are found in Zazzle's marketplace (and get sales). Well written titles and a good tag choice are also important. Basically it's the same story as optimizing a website for best visibility and ranking on Google.

Good luck!
Posted: Sunday, June 09, 2019 4:10:54 AM
Malady wrote:


I have a separate issue with allowing people to customize.
Now, with this I have, for example, generally limited some options to vivid printing because the white is meant to stand out on the design. I will be doing so because I want to show the best example of my designs, but I do want to keep customization open otherwise.

However, this brings another question: should I allow ALL customization and reduce my designs to a single listing for t-shirts? Or should I continue to have "options" in the forms of, say, focusing on alternate filters as a recommendation but then allowing further customization? I may be complicating things a bit too much, so I would really like some help in this area as well.

I read that customization is very important concerning Zazzle, but at the same time I like being able to narrow down options for customers so they can see what I see, if that makes sense. Even so, I want to address this somehow but I'm not sure where to start or if I'm limiting customers too much by focusing on certain styles.

If anyone has anything to add, please do! Sorry for the lengthy post lol, I like ironing out all the wrinkles in a sense.



I went to your store and only saw one product, a mug. I assume the t shirts of which you speak will show up soon. This one mug makes me think you are shooting yourself in the foot with limiting customization. There are 7 different types of mugs that the customer could choose from on the product page and each type has two sizes. But you have locked it down to only that mug and only that size. What should be 14 different choices is reduced to one.


Indeed there are many times when people limit the styles/sizes their product will be sold on. I've done it myself. But only in those situations when changing to another option would cause the design to no longer fit, such as limiting a square design to other square shapes since since white margins would show if it was moved to a circle or non-square rectangle.


But that isn't the case with these mugs. Allowing the customer to choose the larger size means the design would be slightly smaller in proportion to the mug but at least you wouldn't lose the customers who only use big mugs (and they/we are legion). And many of the other options are the exact same size they just have a different color handle/inside.


If there's one thing customer's like, it's options. And if you take those away when it isn't absolutely necessary (as in making the design so wrong that they will return it once they receive it) then they will simply go to a different product.
Posted: Sunday, June 09, 2019 4:56:29 AM
One thing I learned about Zazzle when coming here from another POD that is completely different is that not many sales happened for me until I turned loose the power of customization.

I also had to adjust some of my art styles to fit this customer base before I saw a sale.

If you can add your art to products that make sense for it, add customization (such as a name template) and leave the product options open whenever possible it will help you.

Good luck.
Posted: Sunday, June 09, 2019 11:45:58 PM
vivendulies wrote:
-.-


Customization is big like adding an initial or a name to the design or some inspirational quote that rings with the recipient of the gift, so offering additional products with text templates is always a good idea and your store is lacking in that respect at the moment.

-Love-


You know, the second you told me this I started getting more inspiration to utilize this sort of customization better...I think I could gain a lot from adding these sorts of options. Thanks for your input!!
Posted: Sunday, June 09, 2019 11:56:50 PM
PetsDreamlands wrote:


I love your style and works, especially the mug-artwork (really beautifully drawn). Gives a refreshing touch of color to the wedding-babyshower-trendypattern dominated Zazzle landscape. The idea of creating collections by character is also perfect (I would also create collections with matching product sets, e.g. partner look shirts, mug sets of your different characters, blanket-and-pillow sets etc), and I enjoyed reading the character résumé within the design description (I guess, not many will read the description, though).

What you did wrong in my opinion, is to not allow customization on the mug (and completely block the designer access). Zazzle is all about personalization and customization, that's their huge strength and what makes them different from the vast POD competition. Zazzle's prices are on the upper end, so you want to make sure to give your customer base a little incentive to spend a few bucks more, what you will achieve allowing as much personalization as possible. In the case of the mug, I would add a monogram and/or overlapping name text field template on the right/back side, with a font and colors that match well with your artwork, so buyers can easily personalize their mug.

I've seen you've used a transparent PNG on the shirts and assume you did the same on the mugs (can't access the design, so can't tell for sure). The artworks look like vector drawings to me (drawn and/or vectorized in Illustrator, Corel Draw or other graphic software), though, with solid colors, except the painted background on the shirt design (symbolizing blossoms I guess). In the case of vector originals, I highly recommend to export them from your graphic software into a (vector) PDF and upload the PDF. That way you don't have to worry about pixels and dpi and can resize your work at will within the designer without any quality loss (you'll always get sharp and crispy results). If you want to add painted backgrounds (such as on the shirt), made in Photoshop or similar image editing software, you can save them separately as transparent PNG at a large resolution/size (perhaps 8000 pixel in size to cover up to large blankets, or 10400/11000 pixel for king sized duvet covers and wall tapestry) and combine them together within the designer. That way you can freely mix raster backgrounds (JPG or PNG) and vector (PDF) drawings, and always have highest quality results on the drawings. Don't mix them in your PDFs, keep the freely resizable vectors separated from the raster images subject to resolution and pixel sizes.

In regard to PG-13 and R-rated works, I suggest to put them in specific categories and to create a category image that mentions the rating and tells the buyers to set the content filter accordingly. If I remember well, you need to be registered to set the filter to OFF, and if you put PG/R rated content in collections, the whole collection is rated accordingly and only visible if the filter is correctly set (could be wrong, tho).

....

Last but not least: don't expect quick results. Zazzle has a HUGE marketplace and you compete with thousands of designers, many of them skilled and established, and millions of designs. The best way to succeed on Zazzle is to build up your own customer and follower base and to promote your stores. The more people browse your stores and buy, the better you get listed and are found in Zazzle's marketplace (and get sales). Well written titles and a good tag choice are also important. Basically it's the same story as optimizing a website for best visibility and ranking on Google.

Good luck!


Thanks for all your feedback!! I'm glad you like my art so far, despite my lack of many examples.

I actually use PNGs but due to some technical limitations I rarely use vectors, though perhaps I should do some research into those at some point.

I never really thought to do that for ratings at first! I'm definitely going to add some categories with ratings in mind to let customers know I have more stuff if they're interested.

All in all, I'm going in here to do this as a hobby so I'm happy if even just 1 person buys something, haha. I'm prepared for not having sales at all, especially now when I haven't fully fleshed out my products. But, hopefully, as I work on stuff, maybe 1 person might buy...who knows?

Posted: Monday, June 10, 2019 12:04:08 AM
Susannah Keegan wrote:
Malady wrote:


I have a separate issue with allowing people to customize.
Now, with this I have, for example, generally limited some options to vivid printing because the white is meant to stand out on the design. I will be doing so because I want to show the best example of my designs, but I do want to keep customization open otherwise.

However, this brings another question: should I allow ALL customization and reduce my designs to a single listing for t-shirts? Or should I continue to have "options" in the forms of, say, focusing on alternate filters as a recommendation but then allowing further customization? I may be complicating things a bit too much, so I would really like some help in this area as well.

I read that customization is very important concerning Zazzle, but at the same time I like being able to narrow down options for customers so they can see what I see, if that makes sense. Even so, I want to address this somehow but I'm not sure where to start or if I'm limiting customers too much by focusing on certain styles.

If anyone has anything to add, please do! Sorry for the lengthy post lol, I like ironing out all the wrinkles in a sense.



I went to your store and only saw one product, a mug. I assume the t shirts of which you speak will show up soon. This one mug makes me think you are shooting yourself in the foot with limiting customization. There are 7 different types of mugs that the customer could choose from on the product page and each type has two sizes. But you have locked it down to only that mug and only that size. What should be 14 different choices is reduced to one.


Indeed there are many times when people limit the styles/sizes their product will be sold on. I've done it myself. But only in those situations when changing to another option would cause the design to no longer fit, such as limiting a square design to other square shapes since since white margins would show if it was moved to a circle or non-square rectangle.


But that isn't the case with these mugs. Allowing the customer to choose the larger size means the design would be slightly smaller in proportion to the mug but at least you wouldn't lose the customers who only use big mugs (and they/we are legion). And many of the other options are the exact same size they just have a different color handle/inside.


If there's one thing customer's like, it's options. And if you take those away when it isn't absolutely necessary (as in making the design so wrong that they will return it once they receive it) then they will simply go to a different product.


Oh, I didn't realize this at first I suppose! Perhaps I'm going into this thinking of selling certain items, which is why I limit customization in a way...

I think where I'm coming from is that, I'm designing for a certain size/style of mug in this example, so I wouldn't want the customer to be dissatisfied if they choose an option that's not as flattering. Same goes for my other ideas. I think I'm gonna let go of my presumptions from now on, lol -- first thing I'll do is open up options for the mug, then maybe edit some of the shirts as needed.

And for the T-shirts, I think they should be there, but they're under the PG-13 rating so they won't appear normally.

Thanks for replying! I suppose I'm not a big drinker so I was tempted to make mine tiny and impose my tiny-mug club onto others, haha!Laughing
Posted: Monday, June 10, 2019 12:10:12 AM
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
One thing I learned about Zazzle when coming here from another POD that is completely different is that not many sales happened for me until I turned loose the power of customization.

I also had to adjust some of my art styles to fit this customer base before I saw a sale.

If you can add your art to products that make sense for it, add customization (such as a name template) and leave the product options open whenever possible it will help you.

Good luck.


Hmm, that makes sense overall. I probably approached this as if I'm making the products that I want to sell, but in reality Zazzle functions better with customization.

For art, though, as I continue to make more things, I'm just gonna let people decide for themselves. If they like or don't like what I draw, I'm okay either way. Can't really design for everyone, anyway. Even so, I will be taking note of which designs end up being sold more than others, so it can help me find a new direction to take if needed.

Thank you, I'll try to open up options more!

(Also, I've replied to most comments individually but I'm new to this sort of forum setup, please forgive me if I've clogged up things. I'm not sure if there's a way to do multiple quotes but I'm gonna figure it out eventually.)
Posted: Monday, June 10, 2019 7:15:45 AM
Re: Multi-quoting, this forum doesn't have an ability to do that, except as a manual process of copying and pasting (and making sure you have all the quote/end quote tags structured properly. So it's fine to reply to individual posts.

Let's talk descriptions & tags. I had a look at one of your T-Shirts, and I think you're targeting too narrow an audience with them. Your description would be good on a web page dedicated to the universe your characters inhabit. Selling the work here may require a different approach, though.

Titles and descriptions are the things most important to search engines. Somewhere on the forum is Zazzle's guidance on titling works in a way that works for this site - I'll see if I can find a link to that.

Descriptions need to be rich in keywords that help an unsighted machine serve your work up to users based on their search terms. Keep that middleman in mind when you write descriptions. They have to be written in a way sensible to humans, but as if they aren't able to see the work (because they aren't, until you get a search engine to send them there.)

For instance, your description of your character doesn't fully described what a person would see if they're looking at the work. There appears to be some sort of flower behind her, and red smoke(?) behind that. Apart from talking about the eyes she has collected, you also don't really say anything about what she looks like, her hairstyle and mode of dress, or the genre of the art. Keywords related to these help get your work in front of a larger audience.

ETA, re tags: A well written description will suggest tags that might attract people searching on Zazzle. While external search engines may ignore tags, they are needed for customers conducting searches within Zazzle. Try to tag with phrases that someone might use in searching for works like yours. I try to mix very specific tags with broader ones; it's a bit of a balancing act. You don't want them too general, or you'll be lost in a sea of thousands of competing works. But if they're too specific, the work may not be seen by enough people. For example, using a character's name as a tag may not be as helpful, unless your work is well known and people would use that themselves to find the work.
Posted: Monday, June 10, 2019 7:59:45 AM
Fuzzy Felosarix wrote:
Re: Multi-quoting, this forum doesn't have an ability to do that, except as a manual process of copying and pasting (and making sure you have all the quote/end quote tags structured properly. So it's fine to reply to individual posts.

Let's talk descriptions & tags. I had a look at one of your T-Shirts, and I think you're targeting too narrow an audience with them. Your description would be good on a web page dedicated to the universe your characters inhabit. Selling the work here may require a different approach, though.

Titles and descriptions are the things most important to search engines. Somewhere on the forum is Zazzle's guidance on titling works in a way that works for this site - I'll see if I can find a link to that.

Descriptions need to be rich in keywords that help an unsighted machine serve your work up to users based on their search terms. Keep that middleman in mind when you write descriptions. They have to be written in a way sensible to humans, but as if they aren't able to see the work (because they aren't, until you get a search engine to send them there.)

For instance, your description of your character doesn't fully described what a person would see if they're looking at the work. There appears to be some sort of flower behind her, and red smoke(?) behind that. Apart from talking about the eyes she has collected, you also don't really say anything about what she looks like, her hairstyle and mode of dress, or the genre of the art. Keywords related to these help get your work in front of a larger audience.

ETA, re tags: A well written description will suggest tags that might attract people searching on Zazzle. While external search engines may ignore tags, they are needed for customers conducting searches within Zazzle. Try to tag with phrases that someone might use in searching for works like yours. I try to mix very specific tags with broader ones; it's a bit of a balancing act. You don't want them too general, or you'll be lost in a sea of thousands of competing works. But if they're too specific, the work may not be seen by enough people. For example, using a character's name as a tag may not be as helpful, unless your work is well known and people would use that themselves to find the work.


yes and you can look at other designers who have similar work to your own and get ideas for keywords

the one that imediatlely comes to my mind is "anime" but if that is too broad you could use it in a phrase that helps narrow down more to your style like "creepy monster anime" for example, this would be called up for the exact phrase and also any individual words in the phrase.

hth

Posted: Monday, June 10, 2019 4:20:25 PM
Not everyone wants to customize. Looks good so far.
Posted: Tuesday, June 11, 2019 1:56:02 PM
Fuzzy Felosarix wrote:
Re: Multi-quoting, this forum doesn't have an ability to do that, except as a manual process of copying and pasting (and making sure you have all the quote/end quote tags structured properly. So it's fine to reply to individual posts.

Let's talk descriptions & tags. I had a look at one of your T-Shirts, and I think you're targeting too narrow an audience with them. Your description would be good on a web page dedicated to the universe your characters inhabit. Selling the work here may require a different approach, though.

Titles and descriptions are the things most important to search engines. Somewhere on the forum is Zazzle's guidance on titling works in a way that works for this site - I'll see if I can find a link to that.

Descriptions need to be rich in keywords that help an unsighted machine serve your work up to users based on their search terms. Keep that middleman in mind when you write descriptions. They have to be written in a way sensible to humans, but as if they aren't able to see the work (because they aren't, until you get a search engine to send them there.)

For instance, your description of your character doesn't fully described what a person would see if they're looking at the work. There appears to be some sort of flower behind her, and red smoke(?) behind that. Apart from talking about the eyes she has collected, you also don't really say anything about what she looks like, her hairstyle and mode of dress, or the genre of the art. Keywords related to these help get your work in front of a larger audience.

ETA, re tags: A well written description will suggest tags that might attract people searching on Zazzle. While external search engines may ignore tags, they are needed for customers conducting searches within Zazzle. Try to tag with phrases that someone might use in searching for works like yours. I try to mix very specific tags with broader ones; it's a bit of a balancing act. You don't want them too general, or you'll be lost in a sea of thousands of competing works. But if they're too specific, the work may not be seen by enough people. For example, using a character's name as a tag may not be as helpful, unless your work is well known and people would use that themselves to find the work.


Yeah, tagging is one thing I have trouble with since sometimes I'm unsure of how much or how specific I should be. I read as well that despite the tag limit it may be useful to add more, so I may need to do that as well if it's actually allowed! I may exclude character names but mainly just include store name, since that's the easiest way to help people search for my store I would imagine. Of course at the moment it means little since I don't have a big brand to work with.

Also just noticed that perhaps naming isn't important since the title should focus on more than that. I can establish a character and ideas, obviously, but from what you're saying I should also try to add in more general keywords so my work can be easily searched, right? That seems reasonable, I guess I gotta add more tags that are appropriate.

Perhaps, in descriptions, I can describe more of the piece in addition to adding story items, while also keeping each entry different so that search engines pick them up. I'll probably write more into them soon, then. When I first made the descriptions I didn't want to make them too long, but I suppose a few more descriptive sentences wouldn't hurt.

I enjoyed reading your thoughts a lot, thank you for commenting!

(And yes it's smoke haha, I was experimenting with a different textured brush and liked the look of the red so I kept it in with the design.)
Posted: Tuesday, June 11, 2019 2:00:35 PM
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
Fuzzy Felosarix wrote:
-quote cut for space-


yes and you can look at other designers who have similar work to your own and get ideas for keywords

the one that imediatlely comes to my mind is "anime" but if that is too broad you could use it in a phrase that helps narrow down more to your style like "creepy monster anime" for example, this would be called up for the exact phrase and also any individual words in the phrase.

hth



I was tempted to add in anime to the tags but again, I was unsure of how many I should place into the tags at once. Though this definitely will be added in given my somewhat apparent anime influence! I'm gonna do more research with this and hopefully find a way to improve this part of my designs. Thanks!
Posted: Tuesday, June 11, 2019 2:04:18 PM
PunHouse wrote:
Not everyone wants to customize. Looks good so far.


Yeah, I'm more on that side of wanting to buy an item I like for the way it's designed (I don't have many things with my name on it, lol). But I do want to add some options for those that want custom items. I may try to make specific custom things so I don't have to change my regular pieces that are art-focused. Thank you!!
Posted: Tuesday, June 11, 2019 2:51:40 PM
Malady wrote:

Yeah, tagging is one thing I have trouble with since sometimes I'm unsure of how much or how specific I should be. I read as well that despite the tag limit it may be useful to add more, so I may need to do that as well if it's actually allowed!


It sounds like you may have been reading some older threads that are now outdated since for quite some time now we have been limited to only 10 tags... you can't add more than that.

When I started here you could have up to 40 tags but only 10 were power tags but that has been gone for a couple of years now. So since you only get ten, it pays to use long tail phrases when you can to increase the number of relevant descriptive keywords in your tags... also remember to only describe and tag for your design and not the product type.

Posted: Tuesday, June 11, 2019 2:58:49 PM
Malady wrote:
When I first made the descriptions I didn't want to make them too long, but I suppose a few more descriptive sentences wouldn't hurt.

"Too long" isn't really a problem. Too short, is. The description is your best option to create something rich in keywords for search engines, so long as you keep it 1) relevant to the design, and 2) sensible to human beings.

Relevant to the design can also be what inspired it, an emotion it portrays.

Here's an example of something else you might work in. I'm currently working on license plate frames; one of the phrases I use is "You'll be driving in style with this chic..."), which leads into the description of the design. In other word, something that inspires the customer to see themselves using that product with your design. Doesn't work for everything, but it's something to try, if you can do it without it becoming awkward/hard to parse. My downfall is probably that my sentences are too long. Shorter bites may be easier for a customer to digest, but that doesn't mean the overall description needs to be short.
Posted: Tuesday, June 11, 2019 7:10:07 PM
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
Malady wrote:

Yeah, tagging is one thing I have trouble with since sometimes I'm unsure of how much or how specific I should be. I read as well that despite the tag limit it may be useful to add more, so I may need to do that as well if it's actually allowed!


It sounds like you may have been reading some older threads that are now outdated since for quite some time now we have been limited to only 10 tags... you can't add more than that.

When I started here you could have up to 40 tags but only 10 were power tags but that has been gone for a couple of years now. So since you only get ten, it pays to use long tail phrases when you can to increase the number of relevant descriptive keywords in your tags... also remember to only describe and tag for your design and not the product type.



Ah, then that's why I just figured out that I can't do that, haha. I'm going to maybe try out more descriptive phrases then, without being too redundant!
Posted: Tuesday, June 11, 2019 7:20:52 PM
Fuzzy Felosarix wrote:
Malady wrote:
When I first made the descriptions I didn't want to make them too long, but I suppose a few more descriptive sentences wouldn't hurt.

"Too long" isn't really a problem. Too short, is. The description is your best option to create something rich in keywords for search engines, so long as you keep it 1) relevant to the design, and 2) sensible to human beings.

Relevant to the design can also be what inspired it, an emotion it portrays.

Here's an example of something else you might work in. I'm currently working on license plate frames; one of the phrases I use is "You'll be driving in style with this chic..."), which leads into the description of the design. In other word, something that inspires the customer to see themselves using that product with your design. Doesn't work for everything, but it's something to try, if you can do it without it becoming awkward/hard to parse. My downfall is probably that my sentences are too long. Shorter bites may be easier for a customer to digest, but that doesn't mean the overall description needs to be short.


I am prone to just vomiting words all over the place when I'm able to describe stuff, especially character info. So, with that being said, I'm planning on using multiple listings to sort of let me write more about a design, even when it's the same one -- then I can add something interesting about the character in little, scattered pieces. Kind of like notes or journal entries documenting their habits!

I'll do my best not to be too wordy; I think having a topic focus for each description helps me write better. Although I will try to include some info about the design itself, I like tying in something story related as well. Maybe it'll work, maybe it won't, but I'm just doing something to build my niche. I'm sure I'm not the first to do this but it probably doesn't hurt to find something unique to go with for my store's theme.

(On a side note, maybe this will help me improve my creative writing skills...)
Posted: Wednesday, June 12, 2019 10:35:58 AM
Apart from making sure descriptions are keyword rich for search engine optimization purposes, the other thing to remember is that you're basically writing ad copy. Not so much in terms of length, but in writing style.

My writing background is technical instruction/reference documentation, which means I have to work to avoid being too clinical in my descriptions. Writing adverts is definitely not my strength.
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.
Print this topic
RSS Feed
Normal
Threaded