for how many is Zazzle their ONLY source of income?
Posted: Thursday, January 02, 2020 12:12:46 PM
Yes it is silly to ask "Does anyone actually make money doing this?", cus if they didnt, this website likely wouldnt survive. But how many people no longer need to have a "traditional" job anymore, because their income from Zazzle etc is sufficient (sufficient for some might be $5000/year and others may be $50,000 (or more)/year... the actual amount is irrelevant, but that it is enough to support you)?

If any of the ProSellers are willing to "raise their hands" that would be beautiful, but I guess I dont really expect it either.

This could be as a single person or as a couple, and I will not limit it to only Zazzle but include any/all other similar type of sites that you may also work on.

I have not set up any of the Stores that I really hope to make money from yet(my current market for my only store is too small/limited) and am just learning the ropes and am doing so with a store that I can make simple designs for, that I find interesting/funny... Primarily to learn GIMP more effectively before I start other Stores.

I have staged goals:
1.) Make one sale
2.) Make enough sales to make the threshold for payout
3.) Make enough to get the exterior of my house painted
4.) Make enough to make a living and quit my "9-5"

3 and 4 are kinda big steps in that process and may never happen, but if I could just clear stage 2, that'd be something to be proud of in my books.

Other than creating A LOT more designs, I think my next steps should be to get a Facebook page and an instagram account... however never having either, I'm not sure how to draw eyes to those accounts without them being tied to my friends and family (which I would like to be completely separate... at least until i get more settled)

ok... I think I'm rambling now. Do any of you make enough doing this to not have to work another job?
Posted: Friday, January 03, 2020 1:41:17 PM
At the moment, my fiancé and I live with my older mother. She still works some from home and we don't ask her for any help money wise. My fiancé is the one with a 9-5 and I started my Zazzle and blog at the same time back in May of 2019. August I had my first sale, one postcard, I met the payout threshold for a paper check ($100 I believe) a week or 2 into December just waiting on them to clear. We are making it okay as is, we don't have children or debt but it will be nice to have some extra cash for a "what if" scenario.

I will say its easy to get discouraged when you aren't selling anything but, when you DO sell something the feeling you get is great. You're happy because you made a couple bucks AND because someone, somewhere likes your design enough to purchase it. You can get as much as you put into it but be aware you'll be wearing a lot of different hats. Being "successful" on Zazzle is up to your own definition but if you don't have a good image, title, tags, description your items will be hard to find on the market place. I suggest you look up Elke Clark and her daughter Jen, they offer a class for 100 bucks I believe BUT they also have a ton of free tips and info. If you are seriously considering getting started, these forums have a ton of knowledge in them with a little digging. Not sure if this is the answer you were looking for but this has been my experience so far.
Posted: Friday, January 03, 2020 1:51:32 PM
I guess that the short answer would be no I couldn't make a living on just my Zazzle sales though I am sure that there are some that do. My sales have been climbing since I started seriously several years ago. Between all my side jobs, including Zazzle, I do fine though my husband is the main breadwinner and if I were on my own, I would need a roommate to share expenses.
Posted: Friday, January 03, 2020 2:21:01 PM
There are likely those who do well enough on Zazzle to not have to get another job, but though I don't know this for a fact, I believe most of the designers here do it for that bit of extra income.

Working to do better and trying to earn more are worthy things to do; having pie-in-the-sky notions of success can be detrimental, destroying motivation, but I can see you already know this. Your short-term goals are good ones that may well lead to getting your house painted. My own single goal at this point is to make it to Silver Pro before I keel over.
Posted: Friday, January 03, 2020 3:40:50 PM
I do it for fun and a creative outlet.... I've been a slow starter without a ton of products, but I've settled into a few good niches and have made around 100$/month for the past few months. I expect now that the holidays are over that will drop down again.

I do think that if you want to be super serious about selling you have to
1) concentrate on products that have a very general and broad appeal
2) have a lot of products, and I mean a lot...
3) be willing to put actual money into your business (which I am not....) In other words, pay for getting your Pinterest Pins, Facebook posts, etc. - 'boosted' or whatever they are calling it
4) be willing (and able) to put the time into it - and not just the fun part of creating, but all of the boring and tedious bits (at least to me) of getting out and boosting your wares on social media, blogging etc.
Posted: Friday, January 03, 2020 4:24:09 PM
Invincible Penguin wrote:

3) be willing to put actual money into your business (which I am not....) In other words, pay for getting your Pinterest Pins, Facebook posts, etc. - 'boosted' or whatever they are calling it
4) be willing (and able) to put the time into it - and not just the fun part of creating, but all of the boring and tedious bits (at least to me) of getting out and boosting your wares on social media, blogging etc.


These two points are also good as well. I have started from scratch with $0 to do anything at all. When I started my blog on blogger, I used it because it was free. Whenever I get my first payout I do want to invest some money in getting my own website hosted, instead of [myblog.blogspot,com] it would look a million times more professional and very cheap compared to buying any ads through FB, Pinterest, etc.

Also be sure to take full advantage of the referral program, you can promote your own items as well as any other designers and receive a referral fee if you make the sale through the link you shared. People post things onto their own websites, pinterest, FB pages, Twitter, and some even use YouTube. If you aren't posting links with your referral code to places outside Zazzle, then you'll only ever be found on the Zazzle market place unless another designer decides to promote some stuff for you (which you will never know if someone is or isn't promoting for you unless they actually tell you which isn't that common).

The whole promoting aspect of things can seem tedious and boring compared to the actual creating process but at the end of the day; do what you can with the time you have and know that you're not the only one doing the boring stuff lol. If you know tomorrow (or whenever) you're going to have a couple hours, try to decide ahead of time what you want to do with your zazzle. It doesn't have to be specific like "i'm gonna make 20 products" or "I'm going to share 50 links on Pinterest". Whether it be sharing links, creating new products, editing existing products or just scanning the forum for more knowledge; its always easier going into it when you have some sort of plan.
Posted: Saturday, January 04, 2020 4:54:06 AM
Invincible Penguin wrote:
1) concentrate on products that have a very general and broad appeal

There's also the opposite tack, which is to trip across a niche that few others are designing for. That's the big-fish-in-small-pond approach, meaning that customers searching for the kind of thing you're designing will easily find you amongst the few others in the same niche.

I said "trip across a niche" because that's often the way it happens. You create one or a few designs that consistently sell, and you look at them to see why they're selling, then create a few more, and they sell too. So you create yet a few more, and before you know it, you've found a niche.
Posted: Saturday, January 04, 2020 1:03:40 PM
OnlineDesignsBahamas wrote:
"Do any of you make enough doing this to not have to work another job?"


Somebody's always asking this question and typically it goes unanswered because the people who make a living here are not hanging around the forums answering questions like this or giving away their trade secrets.

Also, just because one person makes money doesn't mean you can make the same money doing the same things even if you're creating the same designs. There's a lot of ebb and flow going on that no one understands.

There's a list of basic things to do that everyone should do, but doesn't, so if you do those things - setting templates, allowing customization, good designs, titles, descriptions (in case they ever become searchable), tags, do all the zrank stuff... you'll have a leg up on at least 75% of the designers here. Then you have to learn about social media.
Posted: Saturday, January 04, 2020 4:54:44 PM
OnlineDesignsBahamas wrote:
and I will not limit it to only Zazzle but include any/all other similar type of sites that you may also work on.


.... THIS ...

It's never a good idea to have one POD site be your only, sole source of income.

Branch out and put your designs on several POD sites, and the total together becomes your full time income.

And you touched on a very important point that everyone's definition of "full time income" depends on their desired lifestyle.

Many designers are full-time POD sellers.
Posted: Monday, January 06, 2020 4:58:29 AM
Quote:
Somebody's always asking this question and typically it goes unanswered because the people who make a living here are not hanging around the forums answering questions like this or giving away their trade secrets.


Yes, yes. I was actually quite astonished at the number of useful replies that were actually in this thread. I was only really asking for a broad "this has been my experience" and I got a few of those, so I'm pretty content.

I know us newbies can be a lil lost til we find our footing here.
Posted: Thursday, January 09, 2020 1:39:32 AM
You have very good goals, OnlineDesignsBahamas. That is one of my long term goals also, to have enough income to earn a living and I believe it is possible. One of the biggest game changers for me is when I increased my royalties from 5% to 14.9%. So make sure you start out setting your royalties at a good percentage. Because I was robbing myself for years with a very low royalty rate.

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