z-sound in zazzle 2 pages: [1] 2
Posted: Sunday, June 09, 2019 5:35:41 AM
- - -

I currently record the voice over for my transfer-transform video and the word zazzle as a German drives me nuts.

I either pronounce it with a sharp s-sound or I sound like a drunk, when I concentrate on the buzz in the z-sound.

I need a virtual hug.

-Love-


Posted: Sunday, June 09, 2019 6:03:34 AM

Sending you a hug {{ Love }}

By the way I think your accent is great both in sound and writing...

I love it when you write fuzz instead of fuss. it is so cute Smile
Posted: Sunday, June 09, 2019 6:13:20 AM
What if you thought of it like a Tss or Tß? Think less of the buzz, but a more hard sound at the front. Then let the middle z's buzz...

"Tssazzzzzle"

With practice, it will soften out.
Posted: Sunday, June 09, 2019 6:25:55 AM
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:

Sending you a hug {{ Love }}

By the way I think your accent is great both in sound and writing...

I love it when you write fuzz instead of fuss. it is so cute Smile


LOL--- Thanks. Though it is now less likely I keep writing fuzz.

-Love-
Posted: Sunday, June 09, 2019 7:28:45 AM
RGebbiePhoto wrote:
What if you thought of it like a Tss or Tß? Think less of the buzz, but a more hard sound at the front. Then let the middle z's buzz...

"Tssazzzzzle"

With practice, it will soften out.


Thank you, this helped. I sound less drunk and there is still buzz in the z-sound ... Behind the scenes: zazzle pronunciation training
Posted: Sunday, June 09, 2019 10:05:10 AM
vivendulies wrote:
RGebbiePhoto wrote:
What if you thought of it like a Tss or Tß? Think less of the buzz, but a more hard sound at the front. Then let the middle z's buzz...

"Tssazzzzzle"

With practice, it will soften out.


Thank you, this helped. I sound less drunk and there is still buzz in the z-sound ... Behind the scenes: zazzle pronunciation training

you started off great and then by the end I was hearing the tssss sound.

it would have been funny if you rang a bell every third time you said it, lol
Posted: Sunday, June 09, 2019 11:22:38 AM
Jerry Lambert wrote:
vivendulies wrote:
RGebbiePhoto wrote:
What if you thought of it like a Tss or Tß? Think less of the buzz, but a more hard sound at the front. Then let the middle z's buzz...

"Tssazzzzzle"

With practice, it will soften out.


Thank you, this helped. I sound less drunk and there is still buzz in the z-sound ... Behind the scenes: zazzle pronunciation training

you started off great and then by the end I was hearing the tssss sound.

it would have been funny if you rang a bell every third time you said it, lol


Tss is still S

not dzz ...

With dings and to me it sounds drunk like hell.

I try to keep the buzz in but at this point I think a accept a little German sharpness.

Laughing




Oh, z has far less buzz according to google translate
Posted: Sunday, June 09, 2019 2:10:30 PM
My dogs just went crazy trying to find you... Laughing

but they didn't like the bell Stick out tongue
Posted: Sunday, June 09, 2019 7:15:42 PM
Hmm. I thought the 'z' sound in English was roughly equivalent to the sound of a German 's' before a vowel (like in the the word 'Sohn'.)
Posted: Sunday, June 09, 2019 8:14:37 PM
Fuzzy Felosarix wrote:
Hmm. I thought the 'z' sound in English was roughly equivalent to the sound of a German 's' before a vowel (like in the the word 'Sohn'.)


No, Germans don't put any sound on the s, which is why we struggle slightly with z-sound. When you hear a buzz on any German s this person had a little too much liquor.

Grin
Posted: Monday, June 10, 2019 7:46:24 AM
vivendulies wrote:
Fuzzy Felosarix wrote:
Hmm. I thought the 'z' sound in English was roughly equivalent to the sound of a German 's' before a vowel (like in the the word 'Sohn'.)


No, Germans don't put any sound on the s, which is why we struggle slightly with z-sound. When you hear a buzz on any German s this person had a little too much liquor.

Grin

So are you saying that an 's' is silent in German, or that it's unvoiced like an English 's'?

Might be a regional difference? I had two years of German at University, the second with a native German speaker. But that's different from what people actually speak. I recall that after the Christmas break when classes resumed no one could understand our professor (the class was conducted entirely in German.) Turned out she had been speaking "Plattdeutsch" for the last few weeks with her family back home, and forgot to 'switch gears' when she returned to the classroom. ETA, for context: That was 1982-83, so nearly 40 years ago.

Also ETA: Obviously, I'm not even remotely fluent. These days, my use of the language is limited mainly to translating 19th century church records, to aid my spouse's genealogical research.
Posted: Monday, June 10, 2019 8:36:16 AM
vivendulies wrote:

With dings and to me it sounds drunk like hell.

lol, that's perfect
Posted: Monday, June 10, 2019 9:30:30 AM
Fuzzy Felosarix wrote:
vivendulies wrote:
Fuzzy Felosarix wrote:
Hmm. I thought the 'z' sound in English was roughly equivalent to the sound of a German 's' before a vowel (like in the the word 'Sohn'.)


No, Germans don't put any sound on the s, which is why we struggle slightly with z-sound. When you hear a buzz on any German s this person had a little too much liquor.

Grin

So are you saying that an 's' is silent in German, or that it's unvoiced like an English 's'?

Might be a regional difference? I had two years of German at University, the second with a native German speaker. But that's different from what people actually speak. I recall that after the Christmas break when classes resumed no one could understand our professor (the class was conducted entirely in German.) Turned out she had been speaking "Plattdeutsch" for the last few weeks with her family back home, and forgot to 'switch gears' when she returned to the classroom. ETA, for context: That was 1982-83, so nearly 40 years ago.

Also ETA: Obviously, I'm not even remotely fluent. These days, my use of the language is limited mainly to translating 19th century church records, to aid my spouse's genealogical research.


We have a soft and a sharp s but they are always unvoiced. Our Ss consist purely of the friction of air between the teeth.

My Dad grew up in Hamburg, he spoke Platt but he didn't pass it on to his children, so I understand very little Platt. We grew up near Stuttgart that is Swabian and my Mom is an East-Prussian child. Though I speak mostly high German, my linguistic professor heard both my parents origin as well as the Swabian influence in my language.

I can make your ears ring with a little brought Swabian, but true natives will hear the pretend.

As for my English - I received that English country shine in 1986 in the Midlands as an Au Pair during my one year stay. But I'm sure I picked up some American TV pronunciation, since I prefer to watch the English original.

When I arrived in the Midlands I met a Marsian with a strange dialect. A supermarket help spoke in some brought Midland dialect. It took a while before I picked up on the dialect and learned that it wasn't a Marsian. So I know the feeling.

Laughing

Posted: Monday, June 10, 2019 11:17:31 AM
vivendulies wrote:
We grew up near Stuttgart that is Swabian and my Mom is an East-Prussian child.

Interesting. If I could prove the connection in my family tree to a known immigrant in the USA, existing records would take my family all the way back to the 16th century in Weil im Schönbuch, about 30 km from Stuttgart. I also have people from Hesse-Darmstadt and Kreis Siegen Wittgenstein in Nordrhein-Westfalen.

My husband's family hail from various towns in Baden (Burbach, Durlach, Perouse), Erfurt in Thüringen, and the former city-state of Danzig (West Preußen).
Posted: Monday, June 10, 2019 12:18:05 PM
Wow you guys make my claim sound boring...

all I can say is my maternal grandparents were Heindels and Renzelmans and came from Germany back in the mid 1800's to settle in Colorado.

I guess I should listen more closely when my mom, who is the family genealogist, talks about our ancestors... but me being not so much fascinated with it as I am with art, it sounds like Charlie Brown's teacher to me... wah, wah, wahhh.

Sad I know! I really do try to pay attention but none of it sticks to me... Laughing

Posted: Monday, June 10, 2019 8:04:18 PM
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
Wow you guys make my claim sound boring...

all I can say is my maternal grandparents were Heindels and Renzelmans and came from Germany back in the mid 1800's to settle in Colorado.

I guess I should listen more closely when my mom, who is the family genealogist, talks about our ancestors... but me being not so much fascinated with it as I am with art, it sounds like Charlie Brown's teacher to me... wah, wah, wahhh.

Sad I know! I really do try to pay attention but none of it sticks to me... Laughing

My advice on that topic is always the same: Find out stuff now, while they're still alive (and have their wits about them.) I've lost count of the number of times someone has told me they wished they'd asked about stuff while their parents/grandparents/a favorite aunt/etc. were still alive. Once they're gone, they take all knowledge with them that hasn't been recorded in some way.

I recorded interviews with both of my parents. But in my case I focused on their early lives, as I already knew more about the family tree than either of them. You can learn some really interesting and funny things...like one of my brother's having the same name as my mother's 'pet' rooster when she was a child. She assured me that my brother was named after an uncle, and not the rooster.

Another example: I asked her what the hardest time of her life was. I expected her answer to be something related to the Great Depression, of World War II. While she also had interesting insights from living through both, she said the worst time was the 1950s; the Red Scare, living with the new-at-the-time threat of nuclear war, and an economic recession - the latter meaning she was trying to raise little kids on her own while my dad was living 3 hours away because he couldn't find work at home, as a builder living in a rural area, where building ceased when the recession hit.
Posted: Monday, June 10, 2019 8:13:10 PM
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
Wow you guys make my claim sound boring...

all I can say is my maternal grandparents were Heindels and Renzelmans and came from Germany back in the mid 1800's to settle in Colorado.

You might be able to find out where in Germany by looking at census records, if you know where people lived in the USA at the time. Sometimes you get lucky and they say more than just "Germany". I had one ancestor who said she was from "France" in one census, but later said "Hesse Darmstadt". Why France? Because Hesse initially resisted Prussian expansion, joining a Napoleonic confederation instead. Some people emigrated to avoid conscription in the Prussian army.

Sometimes learning where people came from is easier than finding out why.
Posted: Tuesday, June 11, 2019 8:15:22 AM
Fuzzy Felosarix wrote:
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
Wow you guys make my claim sound boring...

all I can say is my maternal grandparents were Heindels and Renzelmans and came from Germany back in the mid 1800's to settle in Colorado.

I guess I should listen more closely when my mom, who is the family genealogist, talks about our ancestors... but me being not so much fascinated with it as I am with art, it sounds like Charlie Brown's teacher to me... wah, wah, wahhh.

Sad I know! I really do try to pay attention but none of it sticks to me... Laughing

My advice on that topic is always the same: Find out stuff now, while they're still alive (and have their wits about them.) I've lost count of the number of times someone has told me they wished they'd asked about stuff while their parents/grandparents/a favorite aunt/etc. were still alive. Once they're gone, they take all knowledge with them that hasn't been recorded in some way.

I recorded interviews with both of my parents. But in my case I focused on their early lives, as I already knew more about the family tree than either of them. You can learn some really interesting and funny things...like one of my brother's having the same name as my mother's 'pet' rooster when she was a child. She assured me that my brother was named after an uncle, and not the rooster.

Another example: I asked her what the hardest time of her life was. I expected her answer to be something related to the Great Depression, of World War II. While she also had interesting insights from living through both, she said the worst time was the 1950s; the Red Scare, living with the new-at-the-time threat of nuclear war, and an economic recession - the latter meaning she was trying to raise little kids on her own while my dad was living 3 hours away because he couldn't find work at home, as a builder living in a rural area, where building ceased when the recession hit.


Luckily for me and my kids, Mom is devoting her time to making online records and she is really good at finding out things. She uses Geneanet, My heritage and is a certified Wikitree genealogist as well... She has traced our ancestors all the way back to 1066. She says we have connections to Churchill and Charlemagne.

Once she gets past 3 or 4 generations it all gets confusing to me. But I am glad there will be a record for my grandson if he ever gets interested.

Right now she is also working on entering war heroes in Wikitree and making sure they are remembered and a lot of them are not in our family tree. This is easy for me to remember since I have a heart for soldiers. Maybe because I was born on Veterans day...

Your advice is good and I can't argue with it. My Great Grandma told me a bunch of great stories about growing up in Kansas and they were very like the Laura Ingalls stories.

Posted: Tuesday, June 11, 2019 8:18:38 AM
Fuzzy Felosarix wrote:
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
Wow you guys make my claim sound boring...

all I can say is my maternal grandparents were Heindels and Renzelmans and came from Germany back in the mid 1800's to settle in Colorado.

You might be able to find out where in Germany by looking at census records, if you know where people lived in the USA at the time. Sometimes you get lucky and they say more than just "Germany". I had one ancestor who said she was from "France" in one census, but later said "Hesse Darmstadt". Why France? Because Hesse initially resisted Prussian expansion, joining a Napoleonic confederation instead. Some people emigrated to avoid conscription in the Prussian army.

Sometimes learning where people came from is easier than finding out why.


Thanks! I think mom has already found this stuff and she surely has told me but I have a hard time remembering everything she has said... she gets into too much detail and loses me... lol. Good thing she is keeping a record!
Posted: Tuesday, June 11, 2019 1:23:23 PM
-.-


Usually church records are the best source and the family bible.

My grandfather on my fathers side was researching ancestry but his ego got a little in the way. At some point some Count Szimeck had to flee Hungary and and his castle was destroyed. He renamed himself "Schümann" but all records are lost of what became of him, according to family lore and since the family of my fathers side couldn't track down ancestry very far, my grandfather believed to be a descendant of Count Szimeck and made up a colored window pain as well as a painting of the castle. However it is the consent of the family that it was wishful thinking on my grandfathers part.

I love the creativity my grandfather developed over the possibility to be a Count.

-.-
Posted: Tuesday, June 11, 2019 1:35:59 PM
vivendulies wrote:
-.-


Usually church records are the best source and the family bible.

My grandfather on my fathers side was researching ancestry but his ego got a little in the way. At some point some Count Szimeck had to flee Hungary and and his castle was destroyed. He renamed himself "Schümann" but all records are lost of what became of him, according to family lore and since the family of my fathers side couldn't track down ancestry very far, my grandfather believed to be a descendant of Count Szimeck and made up a colored window pain as well as made a painting of the castle. However it is the consent of the family that it was wishful thinking on my grandfathers part.

I love the creativity my grandfather developed over the possibility to be a Count.
-.-

I see lot of this kind of thing. A number of my DNA matches have trees that claim to take the family back to nobility/royalty. Most I can disprove with minimal research.

My big roadblock is the lack of records in the USA before 1869, and shoddy record-keeping thereafter.

If you run into a Brennenstuhl or a Colbetzer in your travels, you've probably met one of my distant cousins.

ETA: The way my research is going, I think I should create a T-Shirt that says "My family tree don't branch".

How's the Zazzle pronunciation practice going?
Posted: Tuesday, June 11, 2019 2:27:05 PM
Fuzzy Felosarix wrote:
vivendulies wrote:
-.-


Usually church records are the best source and the family bible.

My grandfather on my fathers side was researching ancestry but his ego got a little in the way. At some point some Count Szimeck had to flee Hungary and and his castle was destroyed. He renamed himself "Schümann" but all records are lost of what became of him, according to family lore and since the family of my fathers side couldn't track down ancestry very far, my grandfather believed to be a descendant of Count Szimeck and made up a colored window pain as well as made a painting of the castle. However it is the consent of the family that it was wishful thinking on my grandfathers part.

I love the creativity my grandfather developed over the possibility to be a Count.
-.-

I see lot of this kind of thing. A number of my DNA matches have trees that claim to take the family back to nobility/royalty. Most I can disprove with minimal research.

My big roadblock is the lack of records in the USA before 1869, and shoddy record-keeping thereafter.

If you run into a Brennenstuhl or a Colbetzer in your travels, you've probably met one of my distant cousins.

ETA: The way my research is going, I think I should create a T-Shirt that says "My family tree don't branch".

How's the Zazzle pronunciation practice going?


I'm at my fourth round of recording the whole script to the video and I kind of ignore the buzz in zazzle. When you record every passage three to four times and listen to yourself it kind of creeps you out, when parts sound weird or impaired because your ears are trained in another language. It is hard enough to get used to your own voice as it is.

At least I slowly get a handle on audacity with making a voice sound like a professional radio host or an alien, ghost or chipmunk.

Happy
Posted: Wednesday, June 12, 2019 11:16:33 AM
Grin

and a short video (46sec) squeezed in just for fun to celebrate the new foil favor tags.



-Love-
Posted: Wednesday, June 12, 2019 1:55:54 PM
Wunderbar!

and funny too!Laughing
Posted: Wednesday, June 12, 2019 4:54:03 PM
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
Wunderbar!

and funny too!Laughing


___ Love Thank You Love ___
Posted: Saturday, June 15, 2019 6:16:41 AM
Uffz: ... finally it is up ...





Another zazzle video and the one the zazzle training was for ... though in the end I finally had enough and published just as is with the pronunciation.

It also contains my very first animation with lip sync. Whohooo!


Laughing
Posted: Monday, June 17, 2019 4:06:04 PM
Laughing
Posted: Monday, June 17, 2019 4:43:02 PM
I approve too!

LMAOLaughing
Posted: Wednesday, July 03, 2019 1:27:48 PM
Seems zazzle yanked the youTube thread in the affiliate subforum ... no updates on youTube videos on zazzle videos from zazzlers there ... pity... oh well.


I made a banner run with most of my zazzle collection banners, it is the fastest way to get a good idea of what is in my shop with the exception of my pattern collections.

https://youtu.be/BEHf8fMnzhI
Posted: Monday, July 08, 2019 4:53:14 AM
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
My dogs just went crazy trying to find you... Laughing

but they didn't like the bell Stick out tongue


My dogs were salvating after hearing the sound of the bell.

They must be pavlov dogs :-)
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