This native is getting restless
Posted: Monday, August 26, 2019 9:47:27 AM
·▽·

By the time you iron out the hot mess you created with the last update my account will be a hot mess.

- collections that need organizing are piling up
- items that I didn't put in collections to avoid messing them up

I already lost track of what I need to fix, once zazzle IT fixed their mess.

Could you, please, roll back the last update, fix what needs fixing before you roll it in again ...

PLEASE!
Posted: Monday, August 26, 2019 11:03:19 AM
I gave up long ago... and my blood pressure is much better now.
Posted: Monday, August 26, 2019 12:19:10 PM
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
I gave up long ago... and my blood pressure is much better now.


I was on a roll - it as pure fun and then IT rolled out their half baked update and I see tedium coming my way of cleaning, sorting and a long stretch of pure utter torture tasks.

Sad
Posted: Thursday, August 29, 2019 5:27:50 PM
The OCD in me is going insane with not being able to organize my collections LOL... I've been keeping post it notes of what needs to go where so once it is all fixed I can play catch up... but it definitely makes it hard to create new stuff as it just adds to the pile of organizing to do after... le sigh... just keep on keeping on Laughing Laughing Laughing
Posted: Thursday, August 29, 2019 6:59:47 PM
It's very frustrating not being able to organize my collections.
Posted: Sunday, September 08, 2019 3:04:20 PM
·.·
PLEASE


Work is accumulating in every account of zazzlers ... hours on hours on hours on hours on hours piling.
Crying

Posted: Monday, September 09, 2019 8:22:50 AM
I know. I was really trying to up my pro-seller level but all the things broken on Zazzle make me just want to give up and go somewhere else. I am somewhere else already so I guess I will just be working on those PODs more until the hot mess at Z is fixed. Hopefully this won't mess up all my holiday sales here.
Posted: Monday, September 09, 2019 9:21:24 AM
angelandspot wrote:
I know. I was really trying to up my pro-seller level but all the things broken on Zazzle make me just want to give up and go somewhere else. I am somewhere else already so I guess I will just be working on those PODs more until the hot mess at Z is fixed. Hopefully this won't mess up all my holiday sales here.


"Hot mess" is right! I am hoping it hasn't gone past the point of no return.

things used to work so much more smoothly when I first started here.

Posted: Monday, September 09, 2019 11:56:20 AM
I feel bad for those who are really trying to make something of their work here, for the pain you're experiencing.

My success here was both brief and pretty limited, so perhaps I have a different perspective on things. Is it really worse than in times past? It seems to me that there have always been times I wanted to work on something, and watched those plans go up in smoke when something would break here (usually on a weekend.)

There have also been many improvements, but it is frustrating when things stop working/can't be fixed right away, especially those we've come to depend upon.

On the one hand, I have a lot less patience for things being wrong/broken/only partially working. Maybe I'll get back to it later if it gets fixed, maybe I won't bother at all. Especially true of botched product rollouts.

On the other hand, I just shrug and tell myself it's Zazzle - so lower my expectations.

(Unless something really puts me in a mood, and then you get a post like the one I put in feedback this morning about weird/spammy results. But I'm over it now. It's just Zazzle being Zazzle. Nothing new. I have to either work around it or go do something else. Usually the latter.)
Posted: Monday, September 09, 2019 12:12:50 PM
Fuzzy Felosarix wrote:
I feel bad for those who are really trying to make something of their work here, for the pain you're experiencing.

My success here was both brief and pretty limited, so perhaps I have a different perspective on things. Is it really worse than in times past? It seems to me that there have always been times I wanted to work on something, and watched those plans go up in smoke when something would break here (usually on a weekend.)

There have also been many improvements, but it is frustrating when things stop working/can't be fixed right away, especially those we've come to depend upon.

On the one hand, I have a lot less patience for things being wrong/broken/only partially working. Maybe I'll get back to it later if it gets fixed, maybe I won't bother at all. Especially true of botched product rollouts.



On the other hand, I just shrug and tell myself it's Zazzle - so lower my expectations.

(Unless something really puts me in a mood, and then you get a post like the one I put in feedback this morning about weird/spammy results. But I'm over it now. It's just Zazzle being Zazzle. Nothing new. I have to either work around it or go do something else. Usually the latter.)


So in other words "welcome to Zazzle, the home of the workaround"

?
Posted: Monday, September 09, 2019 1:56:49 PM
My view is Zazzle no longer cares about the designers and that is too bad. I know of another POD where most everyone fled to join here. This is starting to feel like that place more and more lately. I loved this POD a lot so spent most of my time here but I can go work at my other POD stores and they will receive my newest designs while I might not even bother to upload those newest designs here with the state of things at the moment.
Posted: Monday, September 09, 2019 7:46:39 PM
I'm honestly not creating much of anything new at the moment, for here or elsewhere. I have one series to finish posting, but after that? Probably going to focus elsewhere.
Posted: Tuesday, September 10, 2019 3:50:48 AM
I haven’t been here as long as others, but until now, I noticed that the changes and consequent “glitches” came in a pack uncomfortably close to Christmas. I always wished they’d disrupt things during the summer when sales were lower. I’m hoping it’s what we’re seeing now and that those disruptions will be mere memory when the sales start amping up.
Posted: Tuesday, September 10, 2019 4:25:39 AM
I'm with you, Colorwash! I too have long wished that the rollout of new features and major changes to the platform would take place after July 4th and before Labor Day. That would give designers September to vet and get used to any changes; and, it would give tech a chance to iron out any bugs. I would expect the system to be running as smooth as silk preferably by September 15th but certainly no later than September 30th--except, of course, for the occasional glitch that's going to happen in any large system with so many moving parts.

That said, I've been sensing 'a disturbance in the force' on the horizon. I'm growing increasingly uneasy that we're going to be hit with a late September-early October "surprise". And, I'm afraid Zazzle seriously underestimates how much chaos such changes ensues for designers. I hope I'm wrong.
Posted: Tuesday, September 10, 2019 5:38:38 AM
Saints_Aplenty wrote:
I'm with you, Colorwash! I too have long wished that the rollout of new features and major changes to the platform would take place after July 4th and before Labor Day. That would give designers September to vet and get used to any changes; and, it would give tech a chance to iron out any bugs. I would expect the system to be running as smooth as silk preferably by September 15th but certainly no later than September 30th--except, of course, for the occasional glitch that's going to happen in any large system with so many moving parts.

That said, I've been sensing 'a disturbance in the force' on the horizon. I'm growing increasingly uneasy that we're going to be hit with a late September-early October "surprise". And, I'm afraid Zazzle seriously underestimates how much chaos such changes ensues for designers. I hope I'm wrong.


I hope you are wrong too but according to my memory in the time I have been here it seems to be a Zazzle tradition to have upheaval during the holiday shopping season...

ETA: I think it would take a miracle to squash all the bugs and iron out all the wrinkles that are currently plaguing us before the end of this month.

Posted: Tuesday, September 10, 2019 6:17:48 PM
The only thing you can depend on is disruption. Most feared words? "We're working on something really big."
Posted: Tuesday, September 10, 2019 8:36:40 PM
Fuzzy Felosarix wrote:
The only thing you can depend on is disruption. Most feared words? "We're working on something really big."


yes! I always want to run when I hear that...
Posted: Wednesday, September 11, 2019 11:52:02 AM
angelandspot wrote:
My view is Zazzle no longer cares about the designers and that is too bad. I know of another POD where most everyone fled to join here. This is starting to feel like that place more and more lately. I loved this POD a lot so spent most of my time here but I can go work at my other POD stores and they will receive my newest designs while I might not even bother to upload those newest designs here with the state of things at the moment.

I've been getting the same "Cafe" vibes here for awhile now. It's also why I'm looking elsewhere.

It's been ten years since the mass migration from Cafepress to Zazzle but it seems that Zazzle has forgotten where they were before CP self-destructed. Only a few months prior, either in 2008 or 09, Zazzle had to let go of 15% of their workforce because they were struggling financially and would've probably ended up being just another side player by now if things had worked out differently.

Before that happened though, Zazzle dropped a bucket of money in my lap as an incentive to come on board, so I did. Before that I checked them out and said "no thanks" to a 10% royalty and god-awful interface, but when they made me the offer to come on board I was impressed at all their changes. I sent them my work and they built my shops for me. They also had a new interface which was amazing, with the ground-breaking ability to design directly on the product (which they sadly and inexplicably took away in their latest updates).

I still lament over CP's decision to cap our royalties at 10% (or less) and I'm still pretty angry about the damage it caused. So many of us knew at the time that it was going to be their undoing, but before that hammer fell I still recall how we would complain time and again about their terrible business decisions and the way they treated us "content providers" with such disregard and occasional contempt, especially when posting a complaint or offering a suggestion. I'm sure the self-appointed moderators felt they were protecting Cafepress by attacking posters who dared to complain, usually with refrains of "they know what they're doing" or "if you don't like it here then go somewhere else", which at the time meant "get lost" since there was no real alternative back then, but they only ended up hurting the company by not allowing any form of dissent. Zazzle did the same thing for awhile by simply blocking people with an opinion from the message board with no path for repatriation.

The comparison between Zazzle and Cafepress isn't an exact one though, but there's parallels that make me uncomfortable. There's so many tools we need and have asked for repeatedly over the years, with many good ideas and suggestions that get "passed along" but then never happen. I want a POD that provides those tools so we can all function at peak capacity rather than having to jump through a dozen hoops to do something that should only require a few clicks. The changes being made to their platform are all done with shoppers in mind, which is important of course, but pretty much anything for designers is considered low priority. Sad part is I haven't found a POD yet that "gets it", so this is where I am for now.

Now that Cafepress has been bought out, and the company that bought them has been bought out, it'd be interesting to see what would happen if they ever decided to ditch their 10% royalty cap and send out letters of apology to everyone that got burned back in 2009. Another migration perhaps? ;-)
Posted: Wednesday, September 11, 2019 12:57:54 PM
Dementees wrote:
I still lament over CP's decision to cap our royalties at 10% (or less) and I'm still pretty angry about the damage it caused. So many of us knew at the time that it was going to be their undoing, but before that hammer fell I still recall how we would complain time and again about their terrible business decisions and the way they treated us "content providers" with such disregard and occasional contempt, especially when posting a complaint or offering a suggestion. I'm sure the self-appointed moderators felt they were protecting Cafepress by attacking posters who dared to complain, usually with refrains of "they know what they're doing" or "if you don't like it here then go somewhere else", which at the time meant "get lost".

It got so much worse after they hired a new guy to engage with designers, to enforce the view that since the forum was their property, they didn't have to allow any complaints there. In fact, there was video of him bragging in an interview that he was the one who came up with the idea. He didn't last all that long; can't recall if he left before the old owners took over the company or not.

Dementees wrote:
Now that Cafepress has been bought out, and the company that bought them has been bought out, it'd be interesting to see what would happen if they ever decided to ditch their 10% royalty cap and send out letters of apology to everyone that got burned back in 2009. Another migration perhaps? ;-)

In light of a letter I got from them recently (the content of which I probably can't discuss here), I definitely would not recommend anyone signing up with them.

On an unrelated note, I also discovered that searching my pseudonym turns up pages there, even though I closed my account with them five years ago. In other words, they use the names of their "content providers" - including those who have left the site - as a means to drive traffic. Doesn't matter that my reputation wouldn't actually help them in that regard. They're still doing it, despite my asking them to stop.

While Z likes to tell us how important we are, the plain fact is that many non-selling designers are probably more of a financial drain than an asset (and I include myself in that category, now.) I tend to ignore the claims of our importance, and choose to believe my own eyes and ears. I'm coming to the conclusion that selling on line really isn't a good fit for a lot of artists. I also wonder about the sustainability of the print-on-demand model, but I guess I should assume things are fine, until we hear from the company that they aren't.

Posted: Wednesday, September 11, 2019 3:22:22 PM
Dementees wrote:
angelandspot wrote:
My view is Zazzle no longer cares about the designers and that is too bad. I know of another POD where most everyone fled to join here. This is starting to feel like that place more and more lately. I loved this POD a lot so spent most of my time here but I can go work at my other POD stores and they will receive my newest designs while I might not even bother to upload those newest designs here with the state of things at the moment.

I've been getting the same "Cafe" vibes here for awhile now. It's also why I'm looking elsewhere.

It's been ten years since the mass migration from Cafepress to Zazzle but it seems that Zazzle has forgotten where they were before CP self-destructed. Only a few months prior, either in 2008 or 09, Zazzle had to let go of 15% of their workforce because they were struggling financially and would've probably ended up being just another side player by now if things had worked out differently.

Before that happened though, Zazzle dropped a bucket of money in my lap as an incentive to come on board, so I did. Before that I checked them out and said "no thanks" to a 10% royalty and god-awful interface, but when they made me the offer to come on board I was impressed at all their changes. I sent them my work and they built my shops for me. They also had a new interface which was amazing, with the ground-breaking ability to design directly on the product (which they sadly and inexplicably took away in their latest updates).

I still lament over CP's decision to cap our royalties at 10% (or less) and I'm still pretty angry about the damage it caused. So many of us knew at the time that it was going to be their undoing, but before that hammer fell I still recall how we would complain time and again about their terrible business decisions and the way they treated us "content providers" with such disregard and occasional contempt, especially when posting a complaint or offering a suggestion. I'm sure the self-appointed moderators felt they were protecting Cafepress by attacking posters who dared to complain, usually with refrains of "they know what they're doing" or "if you don't like it here then go somewhere else", which at the time meant "get lost" since there was no real alternative back then, but they only ended up hurting the company by not allowing any form of dissent. Zazzle did the same thing for awhile by simply blocking people with an opinion from the message board with no path for repatriation.

The comparison between Zazzle and Cafepress isn't an exact one though, but there's parallels that make me uncomfortable. There's so many tools we need and have asked for repeatedly over the years, with many good ideas and suggestions that get "passed along" but then never happen. I want a POD that provides those tools so we can all function at peak capacity rather than having to jump through a dozen hoops to do something that should only require a few clicks. The changes being made to their platform are all done with shoppers in mind, which is important of course, but pretty much anything for designers is considered low priority. Sad part is I haven't found a POD yet that "gets it", so this is where I am for now.

Now that Cafepress has been bought out, and the company that bought them has been bought out, it'd be interesting to see what would happen if they ever decided to ditch their 10% royalty cap and send out letters of apology to everyone that got burned back in 2009. Another migration perhaps? ;-)


I was never at CP but I have wondered lately if people from behind the scenes there had come to work for Z and brought their policies with them.
Posted: Wednesday, September 11, 2019 5:34:10 PM
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
I was never at CP but I have wondered lately if people from behind the scenes there had come to work for Z and brought their policies with them.

My feeling has always been that our invisibility is our worst handicap. Because we're out of sight we're out of mind, and since we really don't have a voice or a physical presence, as long as they're making money off us and they know we need them more than they need any one of us, then there's going to be a certain degree of dismissal.

With Cafepress, they went from humble beginnings and a close connection with us shopkeepers in the early days to growing too fast and losing that connection while they chased after dollar signs. I'd say that connection is a little lost here as well.
Posted: Wednesday, September 11, 2019 8:11:16 PM
Dementees wrote:
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
I was never at CP but I have wondered lately if people from behind the scenes there had come to work for Z and brought their policies with them.

My feeling has always been that our invisibility is our worst handicap. Because we're out of sight we're out of mind, and since we really don't have a voice or a physical presence, as long as they're making money off us and they know we need them more than they need any one of us, then there's going to be a certain degree of dismissal.

With Cafepress, they went from humble beginnings and a close connection with us shopkeepers in the early days to growing too fast and losing that connection while they chased after dollar signs. I'd say that connection is a little lost here as well.


sad, but seems to be true...
Posted: Wednesday, September 11, 2019 9:23:33 PM
·▽·


We are certainly not partners on equal footing, not as individual and since we're not organized and have any tools to quickly remove an reenter our designs not as a group either.

We do have some power but rampage pirating has diminished that power considerably, too. When I started it meant something that I picked my print on demand service and my designs were only available where I want them to be.

My designs pop up where ever in whatever quality, so my choices have become almost meaningless. The same goes for any designer with any moderate success.

And since my plea for working collections goes into the third week and zazzle didn't roll back their failed update until they know what went wrong and are able to fix it, I wonder if they are inconsiderate, incapable or use this as an opportunity to study their field rats.

The same goes for any print on demand service. It has its benefits but it also comes with huge downsides. Being subjected to failed updates, strange policies and pushed aside for big brands and with money in the bank for one time purchases of huge design repositories and saving themselves that comes with working with large incoherent groups with a certain percentage of hopeless amateurs and outright crooks.

Working with us as a group isn't all milk and honey for zazzle either.

¯\_(ツ)_/¯


Posted: Wednesday, September 11, 2019 11:17:30 PM
This thread is providing some very interesting perspective for me. I'm still very much a newcomer here, so it's interesting to hear some of this history. As I'm trying to "crack the Zazzle nut" and I find myself encountering roadblocks and difficulties, I have to remember that I'm only seeing a very small piece of the overall picture.

I'll often whine about this that or the other technical issue to my "better half" (who is a software developer) and he's quick to point out that what can seem like a "simple fix" from the user perspective can sometimes be an insurmountable obstacle from a programming point of view - and that it's likely that Zazzle is pushing the envelope to a certain degree when it comes to the limitations of web based languages. From my own forays into the land of programming, I know that it's all too easy to paint oneself into a corner with decisions one made eons ago that ripple through your software FOREVER!

I'm also getting the impression that Zazzle is going through some internal growing pains. It's unclear to me how big they are in terms of staff and how fast they're growing, but I know from painful experience that growth and transition can be very difficult things for an organization to manage. I think from our perspective it's easy to look at it and see "Zazzle" - as if it's one giant monolithic object, but the reality is they're just a bunch of people who are as flawed as the rest of us, and they're also in a position where I'm quite sure it's impossible to move forward without making difficult decisions that will inevitably have negative impacts on someone. I've been there, I know.

And I've been getting a definite vibe of frustration from some of the things I've seen Zazzle employees posting on this forum - some of it subtle, some of it not. Hard to know exactly what that means, but it does contribute to my feeling that there are internal "issues" that they're dealing with.

Anyway, I'm not saying all of this to poo-poo anyone's concerns, or discount anyone's frustrations. I am, after all, a newcomer who is still very much just trying to figure out the lay of the land. It may very well be that there is some sort of trouble brewing, but I would, in general, counsel against taking any of this sort of stuff too personally. Ultimately, you just have to try to make the best of it and make it work the best you can for you.

I am, of course, writing this as much to cool my own frustrations as anyone else's. I'm striving to remember this bit of wonderful advice:

Be Kind. Everyone you meet is fighting a battle that you know nothing about.


Posted: Thursday, September 12, 2019 12:45:50 AM
ZingerBug wrote:
This thread is providing some very interesting perspective for me. I'm still very much a newcomer here, so it's interesting to hear some of this history. As I'm trying to "crack the Zazzle nut" and I find myself encountering roadblocks and difficulties, I have to remember that I'm only seeing a very small piece of the overall picture.

I'll often whine about this that or the other technical issue to my "better half" (who is a software developer) and he's quick to point out that what can seem like a "simple fix" from the user perspective can sometimes be an insurmountable obstacle from a programming point of view - and that it's likely that Zazzle is pushing the envelope to a certain degree when it comes to the limitations of web based languages. From my own forays into the land of programming, I know that it's all too easy to paint oneself into a corner with decisions one made eons ago that ripple through your software FOREVER!

I'm also getting the impression that Zazzle is going through some internal growing pains. It's unclear to me how big they are in terms of staff and how fast they're growing, but I know from painful experience that growth and transition can be very difficult things for an organization to manage. I think from our perspective it's easy to look at it and see "Zazzle" - as if it's one giant monolithic object, but the reality is they're just a bunch of people who are as flawed as the rest of us, and they're also in a position where I'm quite sure it's impossible to move forward without making difficult decisions that will inevitably have negative impacts on someone. I've been there, I know.

And I've been getting a definite vibe of frustration from some of the things I've seen Zazzle employees posting on this forum - some of it subtle, some of it not. Hard to know exactly what that means, but it does contribute to my feeling that there are internal "issues" that they're dealing with.

Anyway, I'm not saying all of this to poo-poo anyone's concerns, or discount anyone's frustrations. I am, after all, a newcomer who is still very much just trying to figure out the lay of the land. It may very well be that there is some sort of trouble brewing, but I would, in general, counsel against taking any of this sort of stuff too personally. Ultimately, you just have to try to make the best of it and make it work the best you can for you.

I am, of course, writing this as much to cool my own frustrations as anyone else's. I'm striving to remember this bit of wonderful advice:

Be Kind. Everyone you meet is fighting a battle that you know nothing about.




I worked for several IT companies and there are procedures to keep a certain level of quality management and not to expose the customer to internal struggles with the program. Unfortunately the internet has set some new standards as to what is and isn't acceptable quality.

And yes I'm aware that some implementation can trigger large problems in other areas of the program.

I didn't take it personally. I simply stated facts. I asked to consider that the current flaw in the site causes problems for the partner and accumulates work for the partners, which is why a roll back wouldn't be such a bad idea. They didn't do it.

¯\_(ツ)_/¯


Posted: Thursday, September 12, 2019 9:38:34 AM
vivendulies wrote:

I worked for several IT companies and there are procedures to keep a certain level of quality management and not to expose the customer to internal struggles with the program. Unfortunately the internet has set some new standards as to what is and isn't acceptable quality.

And yes I'm aware that some implementation can trigger large problems in other areas of the program.

I didn't take it personally. I simply stated facts. I asked to consider that the current flaw in the site causes problems for the partner and accumulates work for the partners, which is why a roll back wouldn't be such a bad idea. They didn't do it.

¯\_(ツ)_/¯




Agreed.

I mostly wrote my little rant for the sake of calming myself down because I'm as frustrated as anyone. I'm trying to adjust my thinking a bit in terms of how I relate to Z. I had been approaching them like a corporation, but now I'm thinking they're more like a mom & pop operation who caught a tiger by the toe and have been struggling to keep up ever since.

I don't know if that's really the case or not, but thinking about it that way is helping me to just take it for what it's worth and not waste my time & energy bashing my head against a proverbial brick wall.

Here's hoping some of these "wrinkles" get ironed out soon!
Posted: Thursday, September 12, 2019 10:43:48 AM
ZingerBug wrote:
I would, in general, counsel against taking any of this sort of stuff too personally.

That's sound advice.

There's also an issue though of things feeling too impersonal. It's a common problem for small companies once they experience growth.

I personally feel like a shrinking fish in an expanding sea of designers. zRank fits into this, as well. It's supposed to tell us how a store is doing, but instead seems like a puzzle with no solution - because it's not designed to give us feedback specific to what we're doing. It's too general, and therefore ends up being of negligible value to us.

I also have my own bias, thanks to working in an environment that wouldn't tolerate even some of the more minor things I witness on this site. When you're used to having to meet that kind of high standard, other sites can look sloppy, disorganized, and uncaring. Zazzle isn't the worst in that regard. I just get frustrated because I feel like they could be so much better, accomplish so much more, if they would just take care of certain things.

The difference is, Zazzle is in a very different industry - one where they have to innovate and react quickly to change. That 'need for speed' means some other things just aren't as important to them. And, sad to say, I think the relationship with designers is on a trajectory toward that category of lesser importance.
Posted: Thursday, September 12, 2019 11:08:27 AM
Fuzzy Felosarix wrote:
zRank fits into this, as well. It's supposed to tell us how a store is doing, but instead seems like a puzzle with no solution - because it's not designed to give us feedback specific to what we're doing. It's too general, and therefore ends up being of negligible value to us.

The zRank definitely reminds me of dealing with the big G (google.) It's like... there are these very important things we want you to do in order to be successful, but we're not gonna tell you what they are, but we'll reward you if you happen to get it right, so just keep swinging wildly in the dark.

Of course, I understand that they are trying to prevent people from "gaming the system" so maybe there's no other choice. I'm just trying to keep an eye on mine and make note of when it goes up to try to get clues about why it went up. I'm not sure if that approach is helping or not, but it does seem to keep me moving forward (at least in terms of motivation if not actual rank!)
Posted: Thursday, September 12, 2019 12:52:22 PM
Fuzzy Felosarix wrote:
ZingerBug wrote:
I would, in general, counsel against taking any of this sort of stuff too personally.

That's sound advice.

There's also an issue though of things feeling too impersonal. It's a common problem for small companies once they experience growth.

I personally feel like a shrinking fish in an expanding sea of designers. zRank fits into this, as well. It's supposed to tell us how a store is doing, but instead seems like a puzzle with no solution - because it's not designed to give us feedback specific to what we're doing. It's too general, and therefore ends up being of negligible value to us.

I also have my own bias, thanks to working in an environment that wouldn't tolerate even some of the more minor things I witness on this site. When you're used to having to meet that kind of high standard, other sites can look sloppy, disorganized, and uncaring. Zazzle isn't the worst in that regard. I just get frustrated because I feel like they could be so much better, accomplish so much more, if they would just take care of certain things.

The difference is, Zazzle is in a very different industry - one where they have to innovate and react quickly to change. That 'need for speed' means some other things just aren't as important to them. And, sad to say, I think the relationship with designers is on a trajectory toward that category of lesser importance.


All that you said plus the fact that not too long ago some things were done that damaged the trust and showed designers where we really "rank" no details but hopefully I am not the only one who recalls.
Posted: Thursday, September 12, 2019 1:25:22 PM
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
not too long ago some things were done that damaged the trust and showed designers where we really "rank" no details but hopefully I am not the only one who recalls.

I remember, and not something I'm ready to forget. But yes, no details. Hopefully they learned something from it.
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