A "braut"?
Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 8:12:50 AM
I just received the newest promo, and it took me a moment to understand that "Beer & Brauts" was referring to beer and bratwurst. Around here, and if the word is being shortened, it's "brats," which is kind of unfortunate, since who would want screaming, obnoxious brats at a barbecue? I figured, okay, so it must be a regional thing, but I looked it up and it isn't.

This is how I fail to do what I'm supposed to be doing. I get lost in very tall weeds.

Anyway, what's the deal with bratwurst? (I like mine smoked, by the way.)
Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 8:28:35 AM
it is a typo or a spelling mistake... in German Braut means bride... it should be Brat as you said.

ETA: Urban dictionary has braut as redneck slang for bratwurst... hmmm. I am an Okie surrounded by rednecks and I have never heard that, in fact I don't know any rednecks that eat anything close to bratwurst unless ballpark franks count.
Laughing
Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 8:48:14 AM
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
it is a typo or a spelling mistake... in German Braut means bride... it should be Brat as you said.

ETA: Urban dictionary has braut as redneck slang for bratwurst... hmmm. I am an Okie surrounded by rednecks and I have never heard that, in fact I don't know any rednecks that eat anything close to bratwurst unless ballpark franks count.
Laughing

You caused my first laughing-out-loud reaction for the day.
Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 9:02:37 AM
Colorwash wrote:
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
it is a typo or a spelling mistake... in German Braut means bride... it should be Brat as you said.

ETA: Urban dictionary has braut as redneck slang for bratwurst... hmmm. I am an Okie surrounded by rednecks and I have never heard that, in fact I don't know any rednecks that eat anything close to bratwurst unless ballpark franks count.
Laughing

You caused my first laughing-out-loud reaction for the day.


Yay! Happy Laughing
Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 11:20:46 AM
Oh no, I just found out I am a redneck or maybe it is because we have a German Village section just south of downtown Columbus with a long time popular restaurant, Schmidt's Sausage Has but anyway I have heard brauts and brats. So maybe it is a regional thing. Of course, Columbus being between Cleveland and Cincinnati has had to live down being nicknamed a cowtown. That is one of our upscale suburbs, Dublin, has a field of large scale concrete ears of corn. Dublin is where Jack Nicklaus's Muirfield Village Golf Course is located a little way away from the field of corn.
Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 11:38:56 AM
It's interesting how, in spite of such a highly mobile society and mass(ive) media, this is still a country with distinct regional differences. They're certainly not quite as strong as they were even just 50 years ago, but they can still be seen and heard even in the smallest of ways.

Both my parents were raised in NYC where they apparently had pocketbooks and glove compartments. The little upstate town they moved to and I was raised in also called it a pocketbook, but the car had a glove box. I eventually moved just thirty miles north to the Albany area, and women carried a purse, not a pocketbook.

But language is just a surface thing; cultural differences run a lot deeper and are likely the more interesting part of it.

A friend in Italy told me he could go just a couple miles to the next town and discover he could only barely understand what they were saying, not because of accent, but because of dialect. At least we don't have such extremes in this country.

Still, though, how do you pronounce "braut"? Does it rhyme with "pout"? The other question I have is how it even came to be. Is it somehow a combination of a bratwurst and sauerkraut, which is often eaten with sausage?



Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 11:50:13 AM
That's interesting, because I'm originally from upstate NY (near Albany) and we called it a pocketbook or purse. I've never heard the term glove box. We've always called them glove compartments.

Of course, we also say wicked like New England and not the rest of NY Smile

I believe the au in braut is pronounced like the au in Australia.
Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 11:52:28 AM
Colorwash wrote:
It's interesting how, in spite of such a highly mobile society and mass(ive) media, this is still a country with distinct regional differences. They're certainly not quite as strong as they were even just 50 years ago, but they can still be seen and heard even in the smallest of ways.

Both my parents were raised in NYC where they apparently had pocketbooks and glove compartments. The little upstate town they moved to and I was raised in also called it a pocketbook, but the car had a glove box. I eventually moved just thirty miles north to the Albany area, and women carried a purse, not a pocketbook.

But language is just a surface thing; cultural differences run a lot deeper and are likely the more interesting part of it.

A friend in Italy told me he could go just a couple miles to the next town and discover he could only barely understand what they were saying, not because of accent, but because of dialect. At least we don't have such extremes in this country.

Still, though, how do you pronounce "braut"? Does it rhyme with "pout"? The other question I have is how it even came to be. Is it somehow a combination of a bratwurst and sauerkraut, which is often eaten with sausage?





My husbands family is Polish and they pronounce it "braught" then again, they call them Kraut Dogs and they are baked in the sweet kraut after being boiled in beer (a good lager or don't bother).

My Irish/Scottish family just called them sausage and served them with brown gravy and biscuits. Grin
Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 12:03:41 PM
ValeriesGallery wrote:
That's interesting, because I'm originally from upstate NY (near Albany) and we called it a pocketbook or purse. I've never heard the term glove box. We've always called them glove compartments.

Of course, we also say wicked like New England and not the rest of NY Smile

I believe the au in braut is pronounced like the au in Australia.

You lost me on "wicked."

Glove box may have been local to that small town.

We're probably all familiar with the difference between "soda" and "pop." When I first heard the latter, I thought the person was talking about a Popsicle. I'll take an orange one, please.
Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 12:07:50 PM
Tabz Jones wrote:
My husbands family is Polish and they pronounce it "braught" then again, they call them Kraut Dogs and they are baked in the sweet kraut after being boiled in beer (a good lager or don't bother).

My Irish/Scottish family just called them sausage and served them with brown gravy and biscuits. Grin

The English have something called "bubble and squeak" that I used to think was made with sausage because it tends to making squeaking sounds when it cooks. I was wrong, but really, sausage is a noisy critter in the pan and ought to have a special nickname because of it.
Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 1:13:58 PM
I have always had dinner and supper, lunch was only used for a very light meal of maybe just a sandwich, if you cooked, then you had dinner at noon. Then my son married a woman who grew up in California where they have lunch and dinner. She had no idea what I meant when I referred to the noon meal as dinner and the evening meal as supper.
Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 2:01:49 PM
Growing up, dinner and supper were nearly interchangeable, though most often we called the evening meal supper. If it was a large meal, it was definitely called dinner. I believe the older meanings of the words are just as you used them.
Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 2:09:18 PM
Glove box, glove compartment... you mean the cubby hole where we keep the flashlight?

and we drink sody pop 'round these parts. whether is is a brat or a ball park we just say weenies...

eta: I was wondering if weenies would get flagged or not... Laughing
Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 2:14:15 PM
Colorwash wrote:
Tabz Jones wrote:
My husbands family is Polish and they pronounce it "braught" then again, they call them Kraut Dogs and they are baked in the sweet kraut after being boiled in beer (a good lager or don't bother).

My Irish/Scottish family just called them sausage and served them with brown gravy and biscuits. Grin

The English have something called "bubble and squeak" that I used to think was made with sausage because it tends to making squeaking sounds when it cooks. I was wrong, but really, sausage is a noisy critter in the pan and ought to have a special nickname because of it.


In England they call sausages bangers.. don't ask me why because I couldn't tell you but I like it!
Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 4:00:11 PM
A banger is, according to Wikipedia, "A sausage, usually pork, with a tendency to split open with a "bang" during frying. Don't the English poke holes in the sausage so it doesn't go bang? Well, wait a minute, maybe they like it to go bang. I don't because I'm not fond of getting spattered with hot fat.

No "weenies" here, though it's a sure bet the word comes from wiener, another name for sausage, usually a hot dog. I didn't have to look that one up, though I don't know why. Garbage brain.

A weenie around here is a derogatory term for a puny little coward. No idea where it came from and am now too lazy to find out.
Posted: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 4:06:46 PM
Colorwash wrote:
A banger is, according to Wikipedia, "A sausage, usually pork, with a tendency to split open with a "bang" during frying. Don't the English poke holes in the sausage so it doesn't go bang? Well, wait a minute, maybe they like it to go bang. I don't because I'm not fond of getting spattered with hot fat.

No "weenies" here, though it's a sure bet the word comes from wiener, another name for sausage, usually a hot dog. I didn't have to look that one up, though I don't know why. Garbage brain.

A weenie around here is a derogatory term for a puny little coward. No idea where it came from and am now too lazy to find out.


and so we come full circle... weenie, weiner... from wienerschnitzel which is not a sausage or a hotdog... it is breaded veal. Go figure.

Now I am hungry. Laughing
Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 2:42:30 AM
As you can tell, I departed last night following all the food talk. The refrigerator was calling.
Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 7:46:56 AM
Well my 2cents worth is - here in hillbilly land (yes I mean you can hear the banjos playing in the not so far distance - my neighbors to be exact - LOL) these folks here are straight up hill billy and they eat brats - and pork steaks - Just TRY to find a decent Italian sausage here or a decent center cut pork chop - OMG they are hidden under all the nasty brats (in various flavors I might add) or pork steaks ( 3/4 of these are what I toss in the garbage ) Buying meat here is a real adventure - so that's my take on brats and pork steaks - just my rant for the morning

Bubble and Squeak I thought was basically left over potatoes fried with what ever other veggies you have on hand typically cabbage and peas? I could be wrong
Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 8:15:55 AM
I'd have thought bräts would have been most appropriate... Interesting topic though, I'll forward it over to our promotion team.

Also, this thread made me quite hungry, perhaps bangers and mash or bubble & squeek will be on the menu for dinner (we use both of those colloquialisms here in Cork). Laughing
Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 8:38:08 AM
Drew you right in, didn't we, Finbarr. Grin
Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 11:45:51 AM
When I was in college, I had a friend from Massachusetts. She said she was going to the bubbler. Of course we all looked at her like, what? She had to explain to us that it was a water fountain.
Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 11:53:02 AM
I'm German born. It's Brat, Oktober, and Bier for me. Smile
Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 12:00:31 PM
TotallyGoatally wrote:
Well my 2cents worth is - here in hillbilly land (yes I mean you can hear the banjos playing in the not so far distance - my neighbors to be exact - LOL) these folks here are straight up hill billy and they eat brats - and pork steaks - Just TRY to find a decent Italian sausage here or a decent center cut pork chop - OMG they are hidden under all the nasty brats (in various flavors I might add) or pork steaks ( 3/4 of these are what I toss in the garbage ) Buying meat here is a real adventure - so that's my take on brats and pork steaks - just my rant for the morning

Bubble and Squeak I thought was basically left over potatoes fried with what ever other veggies you have on hand typically cabbage and peas? I could be wrong


Maybe all those thangs these here rednecks are eatin' and callin' hot links are really brats? dunno but I aint about to ask em, theys a ruff bunch
Laughing
Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 12:05:20 PM
Don't look now but the brauts are gone and so is the beer...
Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 12:46:47 PM
They were delicious and now they're all gone. I wish I had a braut/brat in the fridge. I'd love one for supper. A little kraut to go with it, and I'd be a happy girl. No beer though. Beer makes me feel bilious.
Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 2:16:22 PM
Colorwash wrote:
They were delicious and now they're all gone. I wish I had a braut/brat in the fridge. I'd love one for supper. A little kraut to go with it, and I'd be a happy girl. No beer though. Beer makes me feel bilious.


I only like Root Beer! Frosty mugs and all that!
Posted: Friday, September 15, 2017 12:17:03 AM
When I lived in Green Bay people spelled it Brauts.
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