No views on any of these products?
Posted: Friday, August 30, 2019 8:42:07 AM
Two of the most recent designs that I've posted haven't gotten any views, and they've been up for several months. I thought I was improving my titles, tags, and descriptions, but NONE of the products for either design has gotten ANY views (except my own)! So I don't even know if it's just because the designs are no good, since nobody's even seen them to buy them!
Here's the first one- this one even uses Pantone's color of the Year, Living Coral:
Posted: Friday, August 30, 2019 12:53:51 PM
A number of the products appear to share the same title/description/tags. While it may not be practical for each to be completely unique, you may need more variation.

At least one product in the collection (the cheese board) is discontinued.

Here are the tags for one of the products:

coral pattern, vintage coral, living coral, vintage seashells, coral branches, ocean seashells, vintage ocean, ocean coral, vintage nautical pattern, coral design

- coral appears 6 times
- vintage appears 4 times
- ocean appears 3 times
- pattern appears twice

That's a lot of repetition and therefore looks spammy. It amounts to wasting tag space.

Use of the word "nautical" is questionable, since that term is specific to sailing, maritime navigation, and those who engage in those activities. It doesn't really apply to something like coral.

Concerning the use of the word "vintage": Your description makes me think only the seashells are vintage, yet the way it's used in the tags makes me think it's either assembled entirely from vintage images, or that you're using a single vintage image. So I'm not sure about the best usage of it in tags, though I think "vintage ocean" doesn't really help you here, since there's no image of the ocean itself playing a part here at all.

Using the name of a Pantone color as proper noun (see below) could be problematic. It's a risk I personally wouldn't take.

Here is your description: The vibrant color of Living Coral is featured in this design, which has entwined branches of coral over a base of pale green sea fans, with vintage seashell images nestled in the branches.

I might say something more like this: An aquatic design composed from the entwined branches of live corals in pinkish orange, forming a pattern superimposed on pale green sea fans. Small vintage sea shells nestle in the coral branches. The result is an oceanic theme with a stylish and versatile feminine color scheme.

Here are some suggested tags:

live coral branches, vintage seashells, pale green sea fans, oceanic theme, aquatic pattern, feminine color scheme, pinkish orange, green, white, stylish

I hope this helps. Have you promoted these works outside Zazzle?
Posted: Friday, August 30, 2019 3:44:23 PM
Fuzzy Felosarix wrote:
A number of the products appear to share the same title/description/tags. While it may not be practical for each to be completely unique, you may need more variation.

At least one product in the collection (the cheese board) is discontinued.

Here are the tags for one of the products:

coral pattern, vintage coral, living coral, vintage seashells, coral branches, ocean seashells, vintage ocean, ocean coral, vintage nautical pattern, coral design

- coral appears 6 times
- vintage appears 4 times
- ocean appears 3 times
- pattern appears twice

That's a lot of repetition and therefore looks spammy. It amounts to wasting tag space.

Use of the word "nautical" is questionable, since that term is specific to sailing, maritime navigation, and those who engage in those activities. It doesn't really apply to something like coral.

Concerning the use of the word "vintage": Your description makes me think only the seashells are vintage, yet the way it's used in the tags makes me think it's either assembled entirely from vintage images, or that you're using a single vintage image. So I'm not sure about the best usage of it in tags, though I think "vintage ocean" doesn't really help you here, since there's no image of the ocean itself playing a part here at all.

Using the name of a Pantone color as proper noun (see below) could be problematic. It's a risk I personally wouldn't take.

Here is your description: The vibrant color of Living Coral is featured in this design, which has entwined branches of coral over a base of pale green sea fans, with vintage seashell images nestled in the branches.

I might say something more like this: An aquatic design composed from the entwined branches of live corals in pinkish orange, forming a pattern superimposed on pale green sea fans. Small vintage sea shells nestle in the coral branches. The result is an oceanic theme with a stylish and versatile feminine color scheme.

Here are some suggested tags:

live coral branches, vintage seashells, pale green sea fans, oceanic theme, aquatic pattern, feminine color scheme, pinkish orange, green, white, stylish

I hope this helps. Have you promoted these works outside Zazzle?

Thank you very much for taking the time to go through and write such a thorough critique. You have some very good suggestions.
About Living Coral, I asked on the Spoonflower group if it was OK, and it was, so I figured it would be OK on Zazzle, too. It seems to be fine, since they have that particular tag as a searchable link. It hasn't done any good, though. Maybe I'll uncapitalize it.
As far as "vintage," the seashells, the coral, and the sea fan in the back are all vintage images. I did manipulate the coral branches to make a repeating pattern.
I see what you mean about the repetition in the tags, but people could search for all those phrases. that's one thing that confuses me about tags. Will I get the same results if I have "vintage coral" as one tag, then just "seashells" as another tag, but someone searches for "vintage seashells?"
As far as nautical, I understand the distinction, but when I did a search for nautical on Wayfair, a lot of seashell and coral designs came up, so I figure it was OK here. (Plus, I ran out of ideas for tags, LOL)
Would someone actually search for "pinkish orange?" "Coral" is an actual color, besides being the object in the design.
Do you mind if I copy your description for a couple of items?
Posted: Friday, August 30, 2019 4:02:01 PM
Connie wrote:

I see what you mean about the repetition in the tags, but people could search for all those phrases. that's one thing that confuses me about tags. Will I get the same results if I have "vintage coral" as one tag, then just "seashells" as another tag, but someone searches for "vintage seashells?"


I am convinced it would be exactly the same because Zazzle's search engine treats mult-word searches as a series of single words.

Here's the test I ran:


Search vintage seashells: There are 6,128 results. The very first product has been tagged with "vintage" and "seashells" (and "coral"). No multi-word tags.

Search "vintage seashells": That's the equivalent of your multi-word tag and it only brings back 1,435 results. That's because putting quotes in the search means that only products that have both words will be included. But the important thing is that the two words don't have to be in the same tag. The exact same product (which has only single word tags) is again at front.
Posted: Friday, August 30, 2019 5:36:02 PM
Susannah Keegan wrote:
Connie wrote:

I see what you mean about the repetition in the tags, but people could search for all those phrases. that's one thing that confuses me about tags. Will I get the same results if I have "vintage coral" as one tag, then just "seashells" as another tag, but someone searches for "vintage seashells?"


I am convinced it would be exactly the same because Zazzle's search engine treats mult-word searches as a series of single words.

Here's the test I ran:


Search vintage seashells: There are 6,128 results. The very first product has been tagged with "vintage" and "seashells" (and "coral"). No multi-word tags.

Search "vintage seashells": That's the equivalent of your multi-word tag and it only brings back 1,435 results. That's because putting quotes in the search means that only products that have both words will be included. But the important thing is that the two words don't have to be in the same tag. The exact same product (which has only single word tags) is again at front.

...and most customers probably don't know to enclose things in quotes for an exact search (and Zazzle doesn't seem to provide a "show me only exact matches" search anyway.)
Posted: Friday, August 30, 2019 5:43:42 PM
Susannah Keegan wrote:
Connie wrote:

I see what you mean about the repetition in the tags, but people could search for all those phrases. that's one thing that confuses me about tags. Will I get the same results if I have "vintage coral" as one tag, then just "seashells" as another tag, but someone searches for "vintage seashells?"


I am convinced it would be exactly the same because Zazzle's search engine treats mult-word searches as a series of single words.

Here's the test I ran:


Search vintage seashells: There are 6,128 results. The very first product has been tagged with "vintage" and "seashells" (and "coral"). No multi-word tags.

Search "vintage seashells": That's the equivalent of your multi-word tag and it only brings back 1,435 results. That's because putting quotes in the search means that only products that have both words will be included. But the important thing is that the two words don't have to be in the same tag. The exact same product (which has only single word tags) is again at front.

That's interesting! So why are we told to use phrases instead of single words in our tags? I guess it explains why a lot of the top sellers still get traffic when they have such puny tags/ titles/ descriptions.
Posted: Friday, August 30, 2019 6:57:54 PM
Connie wrote:
About Living Coral, I asked on the Spoonflower group if it was OK, and it was, so I figured it would be OK on Zazzle, too. It seems to be fine, since they have that particular tag as a searchable link. It hasn't done any good, though. Maybe I'll uncapitalize it.

I tried to find something clear about it before my submitting my previous reply, without much luck. But if you look at the Pantone site, one has to apply for a license to use their trademarks (such as their name) and intellectual property. For instance, their are beauty products that are licensed to use the Living Coral color. Does that have to be in conjunction with the Pantone name for it to become a problem? Does just using the name of the color in the form of a proper noun raise issues?

I can't say for certain that it does, but I also can't say it wouldn't.

I would ask yourself this basic question: Am I using the name as the thing that attracts people? If so, then you're really trying to take advantage of Pantone's name for their color, without them getting anything for it. That's enough to give me pause.

Connie wrote:
As far as "vintage," the seashells, the coral, and the sea fan in the back are all vintage images. I did manipulate the coral branches to make a repeating pattern.

I see. You could probably use "vintage" as a tag by itself, then.

Connie wrote:
I see what you mean about the repetition in the tags, but people could search for all those phrases. that's one thing that confuses me about tags. Will I get the same results if I have "vintage coral" as one tag, then just "seashells" as another tag, but someone searches for "vintage seashells?"

People could search for all those phrases, but are you really getting an advantage if they instead search for a different phrase that applies to your work, but isn't in your tags?

As Susannah pointed out, even if they search for words that appear in different phrases within your tags, your work still has the potential to be found. So I would focus on the most likely phrases while avoiding repetition. If two come to mind that use the same word, I choose the one that seems most likely to garner a match.

I think you're better off getting as many relevant keywords into your tags as you're able, and I try to strike a balance between the very specific and more general tags if I can. Research synonyms if you get stuck. Scientific names for plants, animals, and insects can also be helpful when they're the subject of your design. Basic point: Look for other likely alternatives.

Connie wrote:
As far as nautical, I understand the distinction, but when I did a search for nautical on Wayfair, a lot of seashell and coral designs came up, so I figure it was OK here. (Plus, I ran out of ideas for tags, LOL)

I never recommend following someone else' bad example, no matter how big the company doing it - because you really don't have any way of knowing whether that helps or hurts them with search engines in the long run. My advice is to operate according to best practices, not by copying others that violate them. That applies doubly to things you see in the marketplace on Zazzle. Even so, there are cases where even I give in, such as the word 'monogram', because that ship sailed many decades ago. Most of what you see being called a 'monogram' today, isn't (at least not in the original sense of the word.)

Connie wrote:
Would someone actually search for "pinkish orange?" "Coral" is an actual color, besides being the object in the design.

...and being a word for both the animal and the color associated with it, it does double duty in your tags without the need to repeat it for both representations.

Technically speaking, 'coral' isn't truly a color. If you go to a site like colorhexa and search for 'coral', it begins by showing you two possibilities, one more orange, and the other more pink. Choose one, and you get the page for "light orange", while the other option returns a shade of "soft red".

We wouldn't use the word 'coral' to describe that shade of pink/orange, without the existence of the living organism whence it comes. You might also try searching a site like colorhexa using the hex code, to see how they classify it, since 'coral' (as noted above) isn't its own color, but can be a variant within the range of red to orange.

How would you personally describe the color of coral? Is it pink? Is it orange? Is it sort of both, but maybe a little more one than the other? <- that's how I arrived at "pinkish orange". But you might find something better.

Connie wrote:
Do you mind if I copy your description for a couple of items?

Please feel free to do so, and to modify it as you see fit.
Posted: Friday, August 30, 2019 7:09:09 PM
Connie wrote:
So why are we told to use phrases instead of single words in our tags?

I surmise that it's because using phrases gives you a way to get more keywords into your current limit of 10 tags. Also, if someone does search on the exact phrase you used as a tag, in theory you could appear higher in the search results. In reality, Zazzle doesn't have an "exact match" search limiter, and I see all sorts of things in their search results that make me question my sanity.

So I think you're better off maximizing your keywords through phrases than trying to come up with all the possible combinations of just a few words that might be used together.

Connie wrote:
I guess it explains why a lot of the top sellers still get traffic when they have such puny tags/ titles/ descriptions.

Actually, no. They get traffic because they're top sellers. Tagging advice was also probably different at the time that they became top sellers.

This fits into what I said in my last post about not copying the behavior you see in Zazzle's marketplace - and that includes from top sellers.

I have older designs that are my best sellers. New products using those same designs and similar tags don't sell for me - because things are different now than they were five years ago.

No doubt Susannah will have some good insights, too - not really meaning to answer for her.
Posted: Saturday, August 31, 2019 8:35:21 AM
Fuzzy Felosarix wrote:
Connie wrote:
About Living Coral, I asked on the Spoonflower group if it was OK, and it was, so I figured it would be OK on Zazzle, too. It seems to be fine, since they have that particular tag as a searchable link. It hasn't done any good, though. Maybe I'll uncapitalize it.

I tried to find something clear about it before my submitting my previous reply, without much luck. But if you look at the Pantone site, one has to apply for a license to use their trademarks (such as their name) and intellectual property. For instance, their are beauty products that are licensed to use the Living Coral color. Does that have to be in conjunction with the Pantone name for it to become a problem? Does just using the name of the color in the form of a proper noun raise issues?

I can't say for certain that it does, but I also can't say it wouldn't.

I would ask yourself this basic question: Am I using the name as the thing that attracts people? If so, then you're really trying to take advantage of Pantone's name for their color, without them getting anything for it. That's enough to give me pause.

Connie wrote:
As far as "vintage," the seashells, the coral, and the sea fan in the back are all vintage images. I did manipulate the coral branches to make a repeating pattern.

I see. You could probably use "vintage" as a tag by itself, then.

Connie wrote:
I see what you mean about the repetition in the tags, but people could search for all those phrases. that's one thing that confuses me about tags. Will I get the same results if I have "vintage coral" as one tag, then just "seashells" as another tag, but someone searches for "vintage seashells?"

People could search for all those phrases, but are you really getting an advantage if they instead search for a different phrase that applies to your work, but isn't in your tags?

As Susannah pointed out, even if they search for words that appear in different phrases within your tags, your work still has the potential to be found. So I would focus on the most likely phrases while avoiding repetition. If two come to mind that use the same word, I choose the one that seems most likely to garner a match.

I think you're better off getting as many relevant keywords into your tags as you're able, and I try to strike a balance between the very specific and more general tags if I can. Research synonyms if you get stuck. Scientific names for plants, animals, and insects can also be helpful when they're the subject of your design. Basic point: Look for other likely alternatives.

Connie wrote:
As far as nautical, I understand the distinction, but when I did a search for nautical on Wayfair, a lot of seashell and coral designs came up, so I figure it was OK here. (Plus, I ran out of ideas for tags, LOL)

I never recommend following someone else' bad example, no matter how big the company doing it - because you really don't have any way of knowing whether that helps or hurts them with search engines in the long run. My advice is to operate according to best practices, not by copying others that violate them. That applies doubly to things you see in the marketplace on Zazzle. Even so, there are cases where even I give in, such as the word 'monogram', because that ship sailed many decades ago. Most of what you see being called a 'monogram' today, isn't (at least not in the original sense of the word.)

Connie wrote:
Would someone actually search for "pinkish orange?" "Coral" is an actual color, besides being the object in the design.

...and being a word for both the animal and the color associated with it, it does double duty in your tags without the need to repeat it for both representations.

Technically speaking, 'coral' isn't truly a color. If you go to a site like colorhexa and search for 'coral', it begins by showing you two possibilities, one more orange, and the other more pink. Choose one, and you get the page for "light orange", while the other option returns a shade of "soft red".

We wouldn't use the word 'coral' to describe that shade of pink/orange, without the existence of the living organism whence it comes. You might also try searching a site like colorhexa using the hex code, to see how they classify it, since 'coral' (as noted above) isn't its own color, but can be a variant within the range of red to orange.

How would you personally describe the color of coral? Is it pink? Is it orange? Is it sort of both, but maybe a little more one than the other? <- that's how I arrived at "pinkish orange". But you might find something better.

Connie wrote:
Do you mind if I copy your description for a couple of items?

Please feel free to do so, and to modify it as you see fit.


Just to be safe, I got rid of all the living coral. But I really struggle finding enough relevant keywords. I can look up synonyms, but how many people are going to search for those synonyms?
As far as coral being a color, I've always called that pinkish orange color "coral," and I've seen it called that in magazines like Coastal Living, too. I don't know what else it would be called, that people would actually search for.
I took nautical out of most of the listings. I'm not sure that's really a good idea though. Even when I'm searching nautical for myself, I don't consider it irrelevant when seashells and coral come up. Because it's all part of the sea, and I think the term nautical, while mostly relating to sailors and ships, can also be expanded to enclose anything related to the sea. Because sailors sail on the sea.
Posted: Saturday, August 31, 2019 8:52:30 AM
"stylish under the sea design"
"colorful sea life"
"playful underwater design"
"vacation sites or scenes"
"beautiful simple elegant thoughtful design"
"classic sea green seashells"
"pink coral sea creatures"
"beauty of ocean life"


and remember, the thing about tags is that those "words" are how people might find your stuff. You want as many different relevant readable words in your tags as possible.

repetition doesn't make that tag weigh more or count more.

And it is also possible to mix in events... say baby shower, birthday, reunion, vacation, a certain holiday, etc...

ie. "beautiful women's birthday gift"

IDK... hope that helps...
Posted: Saturday, August 31, 2019 9:12:05 AM
I might use tags like "for your beach house" on the clock
(adding: and other home decor items.)

in general some of these...

"coral pink and mint green"
"trendy colors"
"popular color combo"
"aquatic sea life"
"vintage oceanic theme"
"cute little seashells"
"underwater creatures"
"undersea animals"
"lacy looking branches"





Posted: Saturday, August 31, 2019 9:13:18 AM
JB Designs wrote:
And it is also possible to mix in events... say baby shower, birthday, reunion, vacation, a certain holiday, etc...

ie. "beautiful women's birthday gift"

Unless the design is specific to that event, this quickly ends up being spammy. Most items here, unless they're designed for a specific occasion, can be a gift for any such event.
Posted: Saturday, August 31, 2019 10:36:19 AM
Connie wrote:
Just to be safe, I got rid of all the living coral. But I really struggle finding enough relevant keywords. I can look up synonyms, but how many people are going to search for those synonyms?

It depends on how close a match the synonym is, but that's otherwise a valid point. Not all synonyms will be an equally good fit. It's just one strategy.

Connie wrote:
As far as coral being a color, I've always called that pinkish orange color "coral," and I've seen it called that in magazines like Coastal Living, too. I don't know what else it would be called, that people would actually search for.

Many color names are stylistic inventions, created to sell people things by making them think something has greater value or is more exotic than what's communicated using a more basic color name. (And you can use that to your own advantage, too.)

Unless they've changed the way they begin teaching about color in schools, most of us know the basics as primary colors (red, yellow, blue) and the secondary colors, midway between the primaries (orange, green, and 'purple' - which is really a shade of magenta, but I digress.)

So in thinking about tagging for color, the place to start is with those basics. 'Coral' is not its own color, but a tint (lighter) or shade (darker) derived from orange. So it makes sense to tag for the base color of 'orange' - more people will search for 'orange' than 'coral'.

But I'm not saying that you shouldn't also tag for 'coral' as an extension of the base color of orange. In fact, if your design was using that shade or tint of orange without featuring literal corals, it makes a nice synonym for 'orange'.

What I'm saying in this instance, though, is that you don't need to tag separately for 'coral' the color vs. 'coral' the animal.

(As an aside, the color orange wasn't always called 'orange', either. Just as the color 'coral' comes from an association with living corals, the name for the color orange comes from an association with the ripe fruit we know as an orange.)

The main point is this - tagging for the base color in addition to its tinted, shaded, or toned form gives you another tag to use.

Connie wrote:
I took nautical out of most of the listings. I'm not sure that's really a good idea though. Even when I'm searching nautical for myself, I don't consider it irrelevant when seashells and coral come up. Because it's all part of the sea, and I think the term nautical, while mostly relating to sailors and ships, can also be expanded to enclose anything related to the sea. Because sailors sail on the sea.

The word in application to a sailor is literally derived from the word for 'ship'. Mollusks crawling around on the sea floor are not humans navigating / sailing on the seas.

If I were searching for things that are genuinely nautical, I'd be annoyed to find a bunch of results for other sea-related things crowding out the results I'm really seeking.

But language isn't static; it evolves from such associations and expansions. Language 'purists' will never 'win' these battles, because humans are too good at being able to understand inexactness in usage.

It's ultimately a judgment call, and yours to make.
Posted: Saturday, August 31, 2019 12:47:38 PM
I would also include things like:

"beach house style" or even "modern beach house style"
"coastal decor"



Posted: Saturday, August 31, 2019 1:10:37 PM
MelroseOriginals wrote:

"coastal decor"





yes I almost included "coastal living" on my post...

ETA: which by the way would give you both the words "living" and "coral" in your tags but not together... however if someone enters "living coral" as a search term your design will come up because both words are in the tags.
Posted: Saturday, August 31, 2019 6:53:04 PM
"coastal style" or "coastal decor"
pink coral
seafoam green
mint green
it's almost abstract-looking because of the scale of the artwork, I might try something like "abstract nautical"
"vacation home"
"beach house"

Posted: Wednesday, September 04, 2019 1:50:46 PM
And, please, don't forget that you are competing in a market with millions of other designs, and out in the wild on google with a market of billions.

You need to promote these items to get the views. Add to collections, get them in front of people.

Do not JUST rely on the power of the marketplace to sell your designs.
Posted: Wednesday, September 04, 2019 8:59:27 PM
Wow! Thank you so much everybody for all the excellent tag suggestions. I’ll definitely be using them.
Posted: Wednesday, September 04, 2019 9:01:55 PM
RGebbiePhoto wrote:
And, please, don't forget that you are competing in a market with millions of other designs, and out in the wild on google with a market of billions.

You need to promote these items to get the views. Add to collections, get them in front of people.

Do not JUST rely on the power of the marketplace to sell your designs.

Promoting is my weak spot. Not only is my online time limited and I’d rather spend it designing, but I don’t have a lot of followers on the social media sites, so it’s pretty useless to post things nobody sees.
Posted: Saturday, September 07, 2019 8:43:21 AM
As far as I understand it on the best practices concerning tags, any words that are in a tag phrase are also searchable independently. We are told to use more tag phrases so that we can fit more keywords into our tags, as long as we don't "stuff" those phrases (e.g. "coral ocean green nautical sea"). The phrases have to make sense. So if you have a tag that reads, "coral sealife theme", then if someone searches for living coral (without quotes), then your design could potentially be one of the ones included in the search results. If someone searches for sealife, there again, your design might come up in the search results. Whether or not you appear in the results is another question. If one comes up with 30K results, then yours could be way down at the bottom somewhere and never get seen, especially when Zazzle limits the customer to only 17 pages of results, and in many cases, not even the full 17 pages. I've had search results come up in the thousands and have found less than 17 pages.

Fuzzy Felosarix wrote:
JB Designs wrote:
And it is also possible to mix in events... say baby shower, birthday, reunion, vacation, a certain holiday, etc...

ie. "beautiful women's birthday gift"

Unless the design is specific to that event, this quickly ends up being spammy. Most items here, unless they're designed for a specific occasion, can be a gift for any such event.


I agree with Fuzzy on this point.
Posted: Saturday, September 07, 2019 8:49:32 AM
Connie wrote:
RGebbiePhoto wrote:
And, please, don't forget that you are competing in a market with millions of other designs, and out in the wild on google with a market of billions.

You need to promote these items to get the views. Add to collections, get them in front of people.

Do not JUST rely on the power of the marketplace to sell your designs.

Promoting is my weak spot. Not only is my online time limited and I’d rather spend it designing, but I don’t have a lot of followers on the social media sites, so it’s pretty useless to post things nobody sees.


I've chatted with successful Zazzle designers who do well without any promoting. They say they just focus on good titles, tags and descriptions. The only issue with not promoting is that you're missing out on earning the extra 15% referral earnings on top of your royalties. I have very little time due to having to work 6 days a week, so I do very little promoting, myself. I don't like doing it, either, but I would do it more if time would allow, as I would like to get in on that referral money.
Posted: Saturday, September 07, 2019 11:18:23 AM
Karen Coffelt wrote:
The only issue with not promoting is that you're missing out on earning the extra 15% referral earnings on top of your royalties.

Maybe, maybe not. I haven't had a referral in 4-1/2 years (not counting my own self-referred purchases), but it's also true that my efforts at promoting are sporadic at best. I've simply given up on getting them entirely, after losing one where I worked directly with the customer. So I promote to drive traffic, not to earn the elusive, mythical-to-me referral.
Posted: Saturday, September 07, 2019 11:47:55 AM
somethingartish wrote:
Karen Coffelt wrote:
The only issue with not promoting is that you're missing out on earning the extra 15% referral earnings on top of your royalties.

Maybe, maybe not. I haven't had a referral in 4-1/2 years (not counting my own self-referred purchases), but it's also true that my efforts at promoting are sporadic at best. I've simply given up on getting them entirely, after losing one where I worked directly with the customer. So I promote to drive traffic, not to earn the elusive, mythical-to-me referral.


Indeed.... of all of my sales only 2 have ever earned a referral.... and that was from a link that I emailed directly to the person who instigated the entire setting up of this store by asking me every time she saw me for a print of one of my screensaver photos...

Since then as much as I have posted to Pinterest or anywhere else I have never earned a referral. I only do it to increase visibility and views - if I relied on the marketplace no one would ever see anything I've ever done. I am always quite pleased if a 3rd party has managed to give me a customer... good on them.
Posted: Tuesday, September 24, 2019 9:32:52 PM
Invincible Penguin wrote:
somethingartish wrote:
Karen Coffelt wrote:
The only issue with not promoting is that you're missing out on earning the extra 15% referral earnings on top of your royalties.

Maybe, maybe not. I haven't had a referral in 4-1/2 years (not counting my own self-referred purchases), but it's also true that my efforts at promoting are sporadic at best. I've simply given up on getting them entirely, after losing one where I worked directly with the customer. So I promote to drive traffic, not to earn the elusive, mythical-to-me referral.


Indeed.... of all of my sales only 2 have ever earned a referral.... and that was from a link that I emailed directly to the person who instigated the entire setting up of this store by asking me every time she saw me for a print of one of my screensaver photos...

Since then as much as I have posted to Pinterest or anywhere else I have never earned a referral. I only do it to increase visibility and views - if I relied on the marketplace no one would ever see anything I've ever done. I am always quite pleased if a 3rd party has managed to give me a customer... good on them.


I have little time for promoting. I have rarely gotten referrals, myself. Once in a while, I'll get a self-referred sale. Most of my sales come from 3rd party.
Posted: Tuesday, October 01, 2019 8:34:49 PM
I've noticed a big drop in the views I'm getting too. My view count was really improving at the start of the year, but by the middle of the year the views really dropped off. I can find my new stuff in the marketplace ok, but usually buried under a ton of newer stuff a few pages in (even though I'd only published it a few hours earlier). It's much tougher getting views than it used to be. I remember I used to find my stuff in the first couple of pages on the same day it was published, and it would get at least a couple of views too. Not anymore. The competition seems to be getting tougher and tougher each year.
Posted: Tuesday, October 01, 2019 9:49:14 PM
don't give up folks, this is my best selling year ever....
Posted: Wednesday, October 02, 2019 9:18:03 PM
GillKnox wrote:
don't give up folks, this is my best selling year ever....


Good to know, Gill.
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