Warning for Customers on photo uploads is likely resulting in lost sales 2 pages: [1] 2
Posted: Tuesday, September 10, 2019 7:16:44 PM
I happened to be browsing some other designers' work this evening and noticed some warnings that I assumed were problems with their templates. These were experienced sellers, so it surprised me. I poked around a bit and figured out that the warning I was seeing resulted from the designer setting an image template to require the customer to replace the stock photo with their own. I think the warning is a good thing because it will prevent people from making a mistake on their order... but it's the timing and wording of it that concern me, because had I been shopping and not just looking around at other designs, my assumption would have been that there was a problem with the template, and I should stay away from it.

In terms of wording, the current message reads Warning, your custom product has 1 issue (or 2 issues, or however many.) This message seems very unclear to me, and might lead the customer to believe that something is wrong with the template rather than their customization, which could result in lost sales. It seems to me that a better wording might be: Warning, your customization has 1 issue. That would make it clear that the issue was on the user end, not something wrong with the template. Furthermore, the message gives no indication of what the problem is nor how to fix it. Perhaps it needs a "click here for more info" popup?

In terms of timing, the warning appears if someone enters the "personalize" section and then leaves it without uploading their own photo. This seems premature to me, and once again, I think it may be scaring off potential customers. Why not schedule the warning to appear when the customer clicks the "add to cart" button, similar to the way you get a warning when posting an item for sale if you've left part of the design area blank, giving the customer the opportunity to go back and fix their error.

I'm wondering what other designers think of this issue. I'm inclined to stop using the "require customer to replace with thier own image" option unless these issues are addressed, because this looks to me like it could put a real damper on sales.
Posted: Tuesday, September 10, 2019 7:38:20 PM
I just tested it while logged out on one of my own products where I have it set to force image replacement.

I got a red box warning that said "Warning, your custom product has 1 issue" But when I clicked on personalize in either one of the links it took me to the template area where there was a red warning on the image and the words "replace this with your photo". So it is very specific about what is wrong.

I don't use that force replace setting very often but when I do it is important because I don't want to sell the stock image I am using as a placeholder. So if the warning scares off a buyer or two that is a drag but a chance I have to take.

I personally didn't find it confusing or worrisome.
Posted: Tuesday, September 10, 2019 7:54:34 PM
I see your concerns. I'm used to the warnings, but shoppers may indeed think, something is wrong with the design itself. IMO, the implementation within the warning screen before you purchase (the one that pops up when you didn't replace the content of template texts and images) would be the best solution. Perhaps with a dedicated message on images flagged with a forced replace, such as "this image has to be replaced with your own one" and the inability to move on until it has been done. More detailed warnings on hover or click would be nice, too. Actually it's pretty difficult to find out what the problem is.

Edit: thanks for the input Shelli
Posted: Tuesday, September 10, 2019 7:55:38 PM
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:

I personally didn't find it confusing or worrisome.

I'm relieved that you didn't. For me, it wasn't clear that I should click on the "personalize" button to see what the problem was. In fact, I only got there by chance because I was trying to open the thing in design view to see if there was a problem with the resolution on one of the design elements or something like that.

Hopefully I'm just overreacting (who me?!?) I still think I'll be a bit more judicious about using that feature though. At the moment my stock images are all public domain so I think I'll hold off at least until I can assure myself that it's not a problem.
Posted: Tuesday, September 10, 2019 7:59:34 PM
PetsDreamlands wrote:
I see your concerns. I'm used to the warnings, but shoppers may indeed think, something is wrong with the design itself. IMO, the implementation within the warning screen before you purchase (the one that pops up when you didn't replace the content of template texts and images) would be the best solution. Perhaps with a dedicated message on images flagged with a forced replace, such as "this image has to be replaced with your own one" and the inability to move on until it has been done. More detailed warnings on hover or click would be nice, too. Actually it's pretty difficult to find out what the problem is.

YES!!! That's where the warning should be! (I'm assuming you mean the popup titled "double check your template fields")
Posted: Tuesday, September 10, 2019 8:15:18 PM
Thinking about it, the issue warning should perhaps be replaced by something less scary/more neutral like "Personalize this template with your own content", if the only issue are placeholder images with forced replace. Such as message could even show up on every template product, so shoppers see at first glance that they're dealing with a template that can be personalized.

ETA: @ZingerBug: yes, that's the one I meant.
Posted: Tuesday, September 10, 2019 8:22:03 PM
PetsDreamlands wrote:
Thinking about it, the issue warning should perhaps be replaced by something less scary/more neutral like "Personalize this template with your own content", if the only issue are placeholder images with forced replace. Such as message could even show up on every template product, so shoppers see at first glance that they're dealing with a template that can be personalized.

ETA: @ZingerBug: yes, that's the one I meant.

I like that idea.

BTW, at the risk of revealing my ineptitude with chat slang, what the heck does "ETA" mean? Estimated Time of Arrival?!?
Posted: Tuesday, September 10, 2019 8:24:55 PM
ZingerBug wrote:
PetsDreamlands wrote:
Thinking about it, the issue warning should perhaps be replaced by something less scary/more neutral like "Personalize this template with your own content", if the only issue are placeholder images with forced replace. Such as message could even show up on every template product, so shoppers see at first glance that they're dealing with a template that can be personalized.

ETA: @ZingerBug: yes, that's the one I meant.

I like that idea.

BTW, at the risk of revealing my ineptitude with chat slang, what the heck does "ETA" mean? Estimated Time of Arrival?!?


Edited to add:

Grin
Posted: Tuesday, September 10, 2019 8:28:59 PM
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:

Edited to add:

Grin

Ha! Well, that makes a heckuva lot more sense!
Posted: Wednesday, September 11, 2019 5:20:12 AM
I've wondered the same. Especially on invitations, and some items where I've written placeholder content that's very general in nature - but made it editable text in case anyone wants to change it.

Customer would personalize with their name and date appropriately, but a few fields would remain the same. When there are multiple sides especially - 4 warnings can pop up. Even though I'm familiar with the process, I still get worried when I see this, and it's difficult to tell from the previews WHAT the exact problem is.

Maybe a much larger final preview pops up after you click "add to cart" with a general alert to check all the content and photos, and maybe an indicator for unchanged fields and low-resolution images?

IDK but I've wondered about this as well.
Posted: Wednesday, September 11, 2019 10:49:24 AM
PaperGrape wrote:
I've wondered the same. Especially on invitations, and some items where I've written placeholder content that's very general in nature - but made it editable text in case anyone wants to change it.

Customer would personalize with their name and date appropriately, but a few fields would remain the same. When there are multiple sides especially - 4 warnings can pop up. Even though I'm familiar with the process, I still get worried when I see this, and it's difficult to tell from the previews WHAT the exact problem is.

Maybe a much larger final preview pops up after you click "add to cart" with a general alert to check all the content and photos, and maybe an indicator for unchanged fields and low-resolution images?

IDK but I've wondered about this as well.

Yikes! 4 warnings seems like it might scare off even the most dedicated of customers. I think perhaps I should log out and spend some time browsing/customizing/ordering my products to get a better sense of the customer experience. I probably won't actually buy anything, but I do think it makes sense to see what happens throughout the whole process including when you click on the "add to cart" button.

Not much we can do about Zazzle's functionality, but it might at least alert me to certain design choices that could be inadvertently contributing to customer confusion - like this force image replacement thing (which I'm pretty much just not gonna use anymore unless I've got a really good reason).
Posted: Wednesday, September 11, 2019 12:54:59 PM
How is anyone setting up a product to sell with that warning? Every time I put a placeholder image that isn't big enough, the "Sell It" button is grayed out and I have to go track down a bigger size or different image.
Posted: Wednesday, September 11, 2019 5:35:20 PM
SusanSays wrote:
How is anyone setting up a product to sell with that warning? Every time I put a placeholder image that isn't big enough, the "Sell It" button is grayed out and I have to go track down a bigger size or different image.

The warnings I'm seeing don't have anything to do with the image not being high enough resolution. (That's what I thought at first, but I was wrong.) It's when you set it to force the customer to replace your placeholder with their own image.



If they open the "personalize" section and then close it without actually customizing it - ie without replacing that image - a very unclear warning message appears.

Posted: Wednesday, September 11, 2019 9:33:40 PM
·▽·


This issue was brought up when the option was first introduced and apparently the flexibility in implementing a more suitable solution for the situation with a better wording or implementing the "issue"-warning at a later time, when i.e. the item is going into the shopping basket with a better explanation why and how to fix it, ... implementing the solution is either on a back burner or the IT hasn't a clue of how to implement it with a reasonable effort without rewriting the whole system.

Given the mess they made with their most recent update and how long it already takes them to fix it, I don't want to imagine what kind of chaos this fix will result in ...

¯\_(ツ)_/¯


Posted: Wednesday, September 11, 2019 10:16:05 PM
vivendulies wrote:
·▽·


This issue was brought up when the option was first introduced and apparently the flexibility in implementing a more suitable solution for the situation with a better wording or implementing the "issue"-warning at a later time, when i.e. the item is going into the shopping basket with a better explanation why and how to fix it, ... implementing the solution is either on a back burner or the IT hasn't a clue of how to implement it with a reasonable effort without rewriting the whole system.

Given the mess they made with their most recent update and how long it already takes them to fix it, I don't want to imagine what kind of chaos this fix will result in ...

¯\_(ツ)_/¯




Thanks for the background info! Since I really only started designing in March, I never know what's "new" vs. what I'm just figuring out.

When you say the "current update" are you referring to the mess they made with collections, or was there a broader update to the whole system of which I am unaware? Do they generally announce such "updates" in advance? The changes to the text box functionality took me completely by surprise, and I really messed up a few designs as a result. And then the eyedropper just showed up - I saw a thread or two complaining about problems with it but I haven't used it more than once or twice so I didn't read the thread. Is there some place I should be looking regularly to stay up to date on these sorts of changes?
Posted: Thursday, September 12, 2019 12:16:28 AM
ZingerBug wrote:
vivendulies wrote:
·▽·


This issue was brought up when the option was first introduced and apparently the flexibility in implementing a more suitable solution for the situation with a better wording or implementing the "issue"-warning at a later time, when i.e. the item is going into the shopping basket with a better explanation why and how to fix it, ... implementing the solution is either on a back burner or the IT hasn't a clue of how to implement it with a reasonable effort without rewriting the whole system.

Given the mess they made with their most recent update and how long it already takes them to fix it, I don't want to imagine what kind of chaos this fix will result in ...

¯\_(ツ)_/¯




Thanks for the background info! Since I really only started designing in March, I never know what's "new" vs. what I'm just figuring out.

When you say the "current update" are you referring to the mess they made with collections, or was there a broader update to the whole system of which I am unaware? Do they generally announce such "updates" in advance? The changes to the text box functionality took me completely by surprise, and I really messed up a few designs as a result. And then the eyedropper just showed up - I saw a thread or two complaining about problems with it but I haven't used it more than once or twice so I didn't read the thread. Is there some place I should be looking regularly to stay up to date on these sorts of changes?


There were a few updates. Not so successful were the collections - still broken.

The eyedropper ... worked once and never again since. stopped using it. I have my Kologenerator open anyhow.

Some are announced in advance, some after the fact and some you can discover in your own. There isn't an established process in the company apparently ... at least not yet afaik or not that I can see.
·△·

Posted: Thursday, September 12, 2019 7:08:29 AM
+1
I feel uneasy knowing clicking the choice to "force customer to replace photo" results in a peculiar "something's wrong" warning right that makes it appear there's something wrong with the design.

Idea What that "force customer to replace photo" feature needs is just a warning in the "Details," where customers customize the message and photo that says, "You must replace these photos with your own." I think that would be enough.
Posted: Thursday, September 12, 2019 9:46:10 AM
B.Nickerson wrote:
+1
I feel uneasy knowing clicking the choice to "force customer to replace photo" results in a peculiar "something's wrong" warning right that makes it appear there's something wrong with the design.

Idea What that "force customer to replace photo" feature needs is just a warning in the "Details," where customers customize the message and photo that says, "You must replace these photos with your own." I think that would be enough.

I think that's a fabulous idea!

I've basically decided to just stop using that feature for the time being. All of my stock photos are public domain, so I don't think there's any real reason for me to use it. If you were using a licensed image where your license is for web use only, ie not for print or resale use, then it might make sense to continue using it since it's conceivable one could face some legal jeopardy for using the image outside of your license. At least that's my understanding, I'm by no means an expert in that area.

But for me, I think that given the way it currently works, the risks of using it outweigh the benefits.
Posted: Thursday, September 12, 2019 9:14:11 PM
I may actually stop using that option, as well. I've been putting place holder images with text on them that says, "Sample Image, Replace With Your Own", so it's pretty obvious to the customer.
Posted: Thursday, September 12, 2019 11:00:33 PM
A just-to-be-safe hint to those who are using (allowed) standard license stock imagery as placeholders and who aren't using the forced replace option, what 100% prevents that the image gets printed (what wouldn't be allowed by this license type):

1. Don't use high resolution imagery (with high resolution I mean large pixel size, the ppi is irrelevant) as is as a placeholder. Use smaller sizes and enlarge them (in your image software) to the minimum size requested so you don't get the low size warning. That way you add some blurriness and don't provide the high-quality version meant for printing.

2. If doable and not obtrusive, put a "Sample Image" text on these images. It must not be prominent, it can be small but shall be clearly visible.

In the case of a copyright/license infringement claim (what always may happen for many reasons), that way you can 100% prove that the images you used are really meant to be only placeholders and that you're compliant with the standard license terms (if they allow that). On paper it shouldn't be mandatory, because you can determine with some common sense if an image is used as a placeholder or as an integral part of the design, but it's a little extra-help in the case of disputes.

3. Avoid German contributors on stock agencies. Due to German cease-and-desist practices and laws that are extremely open to fraudulent abuses and copyright trolls, there is always a chance to get annoying hassles even if you're right. Not by the stock agencies themselves, but by some contributors trying to make the real cash with expensive cease-and-desist orders for alleged infringements (sorry vivendulies, you know well what I mean and that I'm right).

Last but not least: I personally would avoid using free stock / public domain imagery of identifiable people, especially children, due to privacy laws. always make sure there is a model release available in these cases, what is always provided on request by reputable stock agencies. IMO it's safer to stick to stock agencies for such imagery.

Posted: Friday, September 13, 2019 12:55:27 AM
PetsDreamlands wrote:


3. Avoid German contributors on stock agencies. Due to German cease-and-desist practices and laws that are extremely open to fraudulent abuses and copyright trolls, there is always a chance to get annoying hassles even if you're right. Not by the stock agencies themselves, but by some contributors trying to make the real cash with expensive cease-and-desist orders for alleged infringements (sorry vivendulies, you know well what I mean and that I'm right).


Not as far as my experience goes. German copyright laws don't invite trolls or hassles. But as someone from Swiss you may see this differently since your copyright is barely existent.

You can work with German stockimage companies the same as with any other.

If someone sends you an unfounded cease and desist this person will pay for your legal fees. There is a simple principle in German law. Who caused the damage pays the bill.

As a victim of copyright infringement and experience in my country as well as in others I prefer German copyright laws any time.
·△·
Posted: Friday, September 13, 2019 2:19:39 AM
vivendulies wrote:
PetsDreamlands wrote:


3. Avoid German contributors on stock agencies. Due to German cease-and-desist practices and laws that are extremely open to fraudulent abuses and copyright trolls, there is always a chance to get annoying hassles even if you're right. Not by the stock agencies themselves, but by some contributors trying to make the real cash with expensive cease-and-desist orders for alleged infringements (sorry vivendulies, you know well what I mean and that I'm right).


Not as far as my experience goes. German copyright laws don't invite trolls or hassles. But as someone from Swiss you may see this differently since your copyright is barely existent.

You can work with German stockimage companies the same as with any other.

If someone sends you an unfounded cease and desist this person will pay for your legal fees. There is a simple principle in German law. Who caused the damage pays the bill.

As a victim of copyright infringement and experience in my country as well as in others I prefer German copyright laws any time.
·△·

We already had that debate. This is not a personal opinion of mine, nor a matter of Swiss copyright laws (which work well, btw) compared to German ones, this is a fact that is widely known and debated in Germany up to governments' levels. Not just for fun there are terms like "Abmahnindustrie" (cease-and-desist-industry) and "Abmahnwahn" ("spamigation" / mass-sending of expensive cease-and-desist orders). Google for "Abmahnindustrie" and "Handelsblatt" (together) and you'll have plenty to read until Halloween. Just a hint: the government is (again) trying to mitigate the exploits with complementing draft laws. The abuses are not restricted to copyrights, but you know that.

There are judges and courts that don't play these dirty games, but there are also a ton that are absolutely clueless and wrong in their decisions. Guess where the professional cease-and-desist lawyers go to win their scams?

Not talking about German stock companies, the agencies aren't the issue. Some contributors are (the ones who submit the imagery). No problem, if you use the images for a simple ad, but using them as placeholder images you're at risk that the image is printed and you may end up in hassles. If you have the disgrace to stumble over such a copyright troll, you MAY have serious issues if that subject orders your product without changing the placeholder (oh yes, they ARE able to) and gets a crispy result without any watermarks or warnings on it. Of course, you should win the cause in a normal court, but you may also lose and the hassles can be very annoying in any case. That's why I suggest to avoid German contributors for placeholders that may be subject to different interpretation.

BTW, my clipart and other stuff I created in the 90s from scratch and sold on CD are all over the web. I know the drawbacks well.

Back to topic: better safe than sorry and it would really be a good choice to replace the warnings with something less scary and to move them to the final warning screen before the add-to-cart, so designers aren't tempted to ignore the highly useful force-replace option.
Posted: Friday, September 13, 2019 3:33:40 AM
A warning as the customers now receive, place them automatically in the mode "I have to be careful", even a second in that feeling may be enough for them to run away completely from the site. In my opinion our first priority is to create a safe home feeling so that every King Customer makes purchases with peace of mind here, again and again :-) Instead of the warning I would prefer something like "Congratulations, looks great, you are ready for the next step :-) just replace the image with yours" It doesn't have to be that exact sentence, it is all about the feeling it carries, the warning as it is now sounds like hell, instead praise them into Heaven for there all think they belong, lol

JMHOLove
Posted: Friday, September 13, 2019 4:59:52 AM
yoursparklingshop wrote:
A warning as the customers now receive, place them automatically in the mode "I have to be careful", even a second in that feeling may be enough for them to run away completely from the site. In my opinion our first priority is to create a safe home feeling so that every King Customer makes purchases with peace of mind here, again and again :-) Instead of the warning I would prefer something like "Congratulations, looks great, you are ready for the next step :-) just replace the image with yours" It doesn't have to be that exact sentence, it is all about the feeling it carries, the warning as it is now sounds like hell, instead praise them into Heaven for there all think they belong, lol

JMHOLove

You get my vote and a chocolate box on top for that comment. So nicely described and so true.
Posted: Friday, September 13, 2019 10:18:50 AM
Interesting discussion guys. My thoughts:

1) If you use public domain photos, it's probably best to stick to the ones that have been uploaded by the actual photographer so you can contact them for model release permission.

2) If you're not gonna use the force replace option, then perhaps it makes sense to put a light watermark on the stock photo so it can't be printed and stolen that way. Honestly, it never occurred to me that people might use that method for stealing a digital photo, but a watermark would make sense in that case.

3) It would be really nice if Z could make the warning more user friendly to avoid concern about using it. But I don't think I will hold my breath on that one!
Posted: Friday, September 13, 2019 10:48:39 AM
Another thought. Probably a pipe dream. Wouldn't it be nice if Z would provide designers with a library of stock photos for placeholder purposes? I'm thinking of images that would not be available for print, where Z would secure the usage rights in the same way they do with fonts. It certainly wouldn't preclude anyone from paying for licenses to use "better" or at least different placeholder photos to make their work stand out, but it would be a really nice service for their designers, and allow us to focus more of our time on designing rather than imagequest. Really, REALLY not gonna hold my breath on this idea, but hey, a girl can dream, right? Smile
Posted: Friday, September 13, 2019 12:15:01 PM
ZingerBug wrote:
Another thought. Probably a pipe dream. Wouldn't it be nice if Z would provide designers with a library of stock photos for placeholder purposes? I'm thinking of images that would not be available for print, where Z would secure the usage rights in the same way they do with fonts. It certainly wouldn't preclude anyone from paying for licenses to use "better" or at least different placeholder photos to make their work stand out, but it would be a really nice service for their designers, and allow us to focus more of our time on designing rather than imagequest. Really, REALLY not gonna hold my breath on this idea, but hey, a girl can dream, right? Smile


At one time they did give us a few placeholders that they preferred we use. I still have them in my images folder and use them. They wanted us to use them because they got a notice from some stock image site about image use but I am not sure where or even if the official Zazzle placeholders are anymore.


Posted: Friday, September 13, 2019 12:45:48 PM
angelandspot wrote:

At one time they did give us a few placeholders that they preferred we use. I still have them in my images folder and use them. They wanted us to use them because they got a notice from some stock image site about image use but I am not sure where or even if the official Zazzle placeholders are anymore.




Interesting. Those sorts of placeholders are simple enough to create, and I used that sort of thing on some of my earliest products, but I wonder if they attract the same sort of customer response as using actual photos.
Posted: Friday, September 13, 2019 11:02:38 PM
PetsDreamlands wrote:
yoursparklingshop wrote:
A warning as the customers now receive, place them automatically in the mode "I have to be careful", even a second in that feeling may be enough for them to run away completely from the site. In my opinion our first priority is to create a safe home feeling so that every King Customer makes purchases with peace of mind here, again and again :-) Instead of the warning I would prefer something like "Congratulations, looks great, you are ready for the next step :-) just replace the image with yours" It doesn't have to be that exact sentence, it is all about the feeling it carries, the warning as it is now sounds like hell, instead praise them into Heaven for there all think they belong, lol

JMHOLove

You get my vote and a chocolate box on top for that comment. So nicely described and so true.


ThankYouRoses Running to the shop now to see if your chocolate for me is waiting on the shelf :-)
Posted: Saturday, September 14, 2019 9:47:37 PM
PetsDreamlands wrote:
yoursparklingshop wrote:
A warning as the customers now receive, place them automatically in the mode "I have to be careful", even a second in that feeling may be enough for them to run away completely from the site. In my opinion our first priority is to create a safe home feeling so that every King Customer makes purchases with peace of mind here, again and again :-) Instead of the warning I would prefer something like "Congratulations, looks great, you are ready for the next step :-) just replace the image with yours" It doesn't have to be that exact sentence, it is all about the feeling it carries, the warning as it is now sounds like hell, instead praise them into Heaven for there all think they belong, lol

JMHOLove

You get my vote and a chocolate box on top for that comment. So nicely described and so true.


Mine, too!
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.
Print this topic
RSS Feed
Normal
Threaded