Finally Taking Down My Optometrist Christmas Card
Posted: Sunday, December 02, 2018 8:55:29 AM
I've finally taken down (hidden, actually) my "Santa At The Eye Doctor" Christmas card, of which optometrists and ophthalmologists (I presume) were the primary purchasers. I'd kept the royalty on this card at 5% for years assuming they'd be bought in bulk...which they were, in the beginning.

But I've finally gotten sick and tired of being "one-ed" to death by buyers whom I assume are running off copies to send out to friends and maybe even patients...most of whom probably make a couple hundred times what I make a year putting my cartoons up at Zazzle.

Christmas cards are generally sold in boxes at brick and mortar store. I think Zazzle ought to give designers the option to set a minimum number on Christmas card purchases which are traditionally sold in lots, not singley as are wedding invitations, birthday and get well cards.

Posted: Sunday, December 02, 2018 9:10:36 AM
And that's why I don't have many Christmas cards. :-)

In the meantime, why would anyone buy just a single wedding invitation?
Posted: Sunday, December 02, 2018 9:14:15 AM
Swisstoons wrote:
I've finally taken down (hidden, actually) my "Santa At The Eye Doctor" Christmas card, of which optometrists and ophthalmologists (I presume) were the primary purchasers. I'd kept the royalty on this card at 5% for years assuming they'd be bought in bulk...which they were, in the beginning.

But I've finally gotten sick and tired of being "one-ed" to death by buyers whom I assume are running off copies to send out to friends and maybe even patients...most of whom probably make a couple hundred times what I make a year putting my cartoons up at Zazzle.

Christmas cards are generally sold in boxes at brick and mortar store. I think Zazzle ought to give designers the option to set a minimum number on Christmas card purchases which are traditionally sold in lots, not singley as are wedding invitations, birthday and get well cards.



I don’t know, I wouldn’t make that assumption. People just aren’t sending bulk Christmas cards anymore. It’s gotten relatively expensive with the current cost of postage and the cards themselves. Besides that, it’s kind of an old fashioned thing to do. The younger generation, who grew up on texting and emailing, probably don’t even know about this tradition.

I doubt people are running off copies of Christmas cards. I think they come here to buy a few special ones. So maybe they buy one of your eye doctor ones for their optometrist uncle, one of my dog ones for Aunt Sue the dog lover, etc. Forcing those customers to buy in bulk when they don’t need or want to just means they will shop elsewhere.
Posted: Sunday, December 02, 2018 9:18:15 AM
Colorwash wrote:
And that's why I don't have many Christmas cards. :-)

In the meantime, why would anyone buy just a single wedding invitation?


For a sample. If I was choosing invites online, I’d buy one of a few different designs, then pick the one that looked best in person.

Sure, some people might be buying one and then running off copies. Shopkeepers have suggested that when you buy one invite, it would say SAMPLE on it.
Posted: Sunday, December 02, 2018 9:20:29 AM
I forgot about the sample thing, but it doesn't matter in my world because I don't do wedding stuff. I suck at it. Tee shirts too. Also baby stuff. And... Well, never mind.
Posted: Sunday, December 02, 2018 9:26:59 AM
The hassle factor and degradation in quality makes it unlikely that people buy a card to scan and then reprint.
Posted: Sunday, December 02, 2018 9:31:21 AM
Colorwash wrote:
And that's why I don't have many Christmas cards. :-)

In the meantime, why would anyone buy just a single wedding invitation?


I think brides are pretty particular and might want to do side-by-side comparison shopping when they buy wedding invites.
Posted: Sunday, December 02, 2018 9:38:43 AM
AugieDoggyStore wrote:
Swisstoons wrote:
I've finally taken down (hidden, actually) my "Santa At The Eye Doctor" Christmas card, of which optometrists and ophthalmologists (I presume) were the primary purchasers. I'd kept the royalty on this card at 5% for years assuming they'd be bought in bulk...which they were, in the beginning.

But I've finally gotten sick and tired of being "one-ed" to death by buyers whom I assume are running off copies to send out to friends and maybe even patients...most of whom probably make a couple hundred times what I make a year putting my cartoons up at Zazzle.

Christmas cards are generally sold in boxes at brick and mortar store. I think Zazzle ought to give designers the option to set a minimum number on Christmas card purchases which are traditionally sold in lots, not singley as are wedding invitations, birthday and get well cards.



I don’t know, I wouldn’t make that assumption. People just aren’t sending bulk Christmas cards anymore. It’s gotten relatively expensive with the current cost of postage and the cards themselves. Besides that, it’s kind of an old fashioned thing to do. The younger generation, who grew up on texting and emailing, probably don’t even know about this tradition.

I doubt people are running off copies of Christmas cards. I think they come here to buy a few special ones. So maybe they buy one of your eye doctor ones for their optometrist uncle, one of my dog ones for Aunt Sue the dog lover, etc. Forcing those customers to buy in bulk when they don’t need or want to just means they will shop elsewhere.


********************

If anyone wants to shop elsewhere for a single Christmas card, that'd be fine with me. I made 14 cent on the sale of one optometrist Christmas card, today. I would rather have set the minimum to 20 cards and maybe at least made a couple of bucks. When I went to view the sold card, I saw that the last view the customer saw was the back of the card. That's where I put my copyright information...which, I assume, the buyer removed to make it easier to make a clean copy (a blank back) by lying it flat on the copier surface.
Posted: Sunday, December 02, 2018 9:42:10 AM
Susannah Keegan wrote:
The hassle factor and degradation in quality makes it unlikely that people buy a card to scan and then reprint.


I think that might be the case with a glossy card. But I think a decent copy could be made from a matte card...which is what was purchased, today.

Posted: Sunday, December 02, 2018 9:43:34 AM
You made 14 cents? How low is your royalty?
Posted: Sunday, December 02, 2018 9:44:40 AM
AugieDoggyStore wrote:
You made 14 cents? How low is your royalty?


Five percent...to entice optometrists to buy in bulk.
Posted: Sunday, December 02, 2018 10:45:30 AM
Bulk cards are so cheap in the shops that it'd cost more to buy a card from Zazzle and reproduce it. I doubt that's what happening here.

The issue seems to be that you're assuming the customer is someone it probably isn't, in that sales to businesses are going to be less likely compared to sales to someone buying it for someone specific. If you do get a bulk order, they'll probably use the sales, so you'd need to charge 10% to get paid 5%.

I wouldn't say selling single cards isn't worth it. Some of mine will likely never be bought in bulk, but the royalties add up. Especially as people sometimes buy other matching items to gift with them.
Posted: Sunday, December 02, 2018 11:00:31 AM
The only professionals we ever did business with that sent out a Christmas card was a lawyer and a real estate agent. Maybe the optometrist cards were being bought and given optometrists.
Posted: Sunday, December 02, 2018 11:01:38 AM
Polenth wrote:
Bulk cards are so cheap in the shops that it'd cost more to buy a card from Zazzle and reproduce it. I doubt that's what happening here.

The issue seems to be that you're assuming the customer is someone it probably isn't, in that sales to businesses are going to be less likely compared to sales to someone buying it for someone specific. If you do get a bulk order, they'll probably use the sales, so you'd need to charge 10% to get paid 5%.

I wouldn't say selling single cards isn't worth it. Some of mine will likely never be bought in bulk, but the royalties add up. Especially as people sometimes buy other matching items to gift with them.


*****************************

I'm not sure I'm following what you're saying. But an optometrist looking for a Christmas card is not likely to find a funny "Santa at the Optometrist" card like mine in brick and mortar shops. While it could appeal to non-optometrists (afterall, I did sell it, originally, to Good Housekeeping as B/W cartoon back in the late 1980s before colorizing it to put on Z products), almost all my tags are optometrist- and eye doctor-related. So, that's who would've been likliest to find it, here.

But in my original post, I said: "I think Zazzle ought to give designers the option to set a minimum number on Christmas card purchases."

All I'm doing is suggesting another simple option for designers. Would any designer have a serious problem with that?? I mean, anyone who wanted to could set the limit on their cards to ONE. And everyone would be happy.
Posted: Sunday, December 02, 2018 11:35:41 AM
Swisstoons wrote:
I'm not sure I'm following what you're saying. But an optometrist looking for a Christmas card is not likely to find a funny "Santa at the Optometrist" card like mine in brick and mortar shops. While it could appeal to non-optometrists (afterall, I did sell it, originally, to Good Housekeeping as B/W cartoon back in the late 1980s before colorizing it to put on Z products), almost all my tags are optometrist- and eye doctor-related. So, that's who would've been likliest to find it, here.

But in my original post, I said: "I think Zazzle ought to give designers the option to set a minimum number on Christmas card purchases."

All I'm doing is suggesting another simple option for designers. Would any designer have a serious problem with that?? I mean, anyone who wanted to could set the limit on their cards to ONE. And everyone would be happy.


I'm saying what others are saying: it's likely someone is buying this to give to an optometrist, rather than optometrists buying it to give to everyone else.

As to the issue of minimum orders, it is an issue for designers in general. When customers want to buy one card, but the designs they like all have bulk orders, they'll give up. They won't keep searching until they find a design they like where they can buy one. Changes that benefit both designers and customers are great. Changes that benefit designers and not customers will ultimately mean fewer customers.
Posted: Sunday, December 02, 2018 12:24:36 PM
MarBethHomeDecor wrote:
The only professionals we ever did business with that sent out a Christmas card was a lawyer and a real estate agent. Maybe the optometrist cards were being bought and given optometrists.


I got one last week from Chewy (pet supplies) though I only buy the bunny hay cubes from them. Maybe because this is my first year as a customer with them. My vet sends Christmas postcards, then again my file folder with him is so thick he's probably going to need to subdivide it soon lol. There may be others that I don't remember from last year.
Posted: Sunday, December 02, 2018 12:47:09 PM
I used to work for a Podiatrist. Every year the business professionals get a catalog filled with cards, postcards, promotional items they can buy in bulk very cheap and have personalized. The doctor I worked for sent his patients birthday cards with a foot theme. He bought the postcards by the hundreds, very cheap. Personally, I doubt a professional with a practice beyond a dozen clients would go to the expense and bother of printing out cards himself and then having to purchase envelopes to put them in.
Posted: Sunday, December 02, 2018 2:54:05 PM
If there is no longer a market on Zazzle for optometrists buying your card in bulk for business purposes, then perhaps you could consider re-targeting it as a specialist niche purchase. Anyone who wants a card to give to an optometrist will probably only be buying one, and will be prepared to pay a premium. What's the competition on Zazzle for cards serving that purpose? I wouldn't be surprised if there aren't any, so you can push your royalty much higher, 25% say. Does that give you an acceptable return? Worth a try maybe when the royalty freeze has been lifted.
Posted: Sunday, December 02, 2018 8:56:10 PM
As a POD company specialized on low printing quantities, Zazzle is definitely not the place for larger bulk business orders. 100 greeting cards will cost you over $225, without royalty, while my (German) professional offset printing service charges 50. Add 150$ for a true, professional 100% custom design and it's still cheaper. The more you print, the bigger the difference. 1000 cards on Zazzle cost $1630. My printer charges 90. With free shipping.

Zazzle is great for personalized, unique, single or low-quantity products. Medium to larger businesses will get their bulk paperware or merch way cheaper using conventional printing services/suppliers, professional custom design included. I would definitely not base my hopes/efforts on bulk orders. And I would surely not impose min. quantities, risking potential sales. I'm even happy that the paper sheets you can use for decorative writing papers may be purchased without any quantity restrictions.

An optional minimum quantity option looks fine at first sight, but if too many designers use this option, customers may think these requirements apply to all cards and may look elsewhere. What could negatively affect other designers' sales, too.

That said, 1 bought card and 15 cent income is better than 20 lost cards and 0 earnings. And if you raise the royalty to a non-dealbreaking 14.9%, the 15 ¢ will become 45.
Posted: Monday, December 03, 2018 5:43:28 AM
PetsDreamlands wrote:
And if you raise the royalty to a non-dealbreaking 14.9%, the 15 ¢ will become 45.

In the best of worlds it'll be 45 cents, but there's nothing on Zazzle that isn't always on sale, the least being 15% off, and cards go on sale a lot. It may be better to jack up the royalty to something like 25%, particularly for holiday cards because they'll be on sale consistently prior to the holiday.
Posted: Monday, December 03, 2018 6:55:06 AM
Colorwash wrote:
PetsDreamlands wrote:
And if you raise the royalty to a non-dealbreaking 14.9%, the 15 ¢ will become 45.

In the best of worlds it'll be 45 cents, but there's nothing on Zazzle that isn't always on sale, the least being 15% off, and cards go on sale a lot. It may be better to jack up the royalty to something like 25%, particularly for holiday cards because they'll be on sale consistently prior to the holiday.
I'm well aware off, already had my 70%-off surprises. What's good for customers is frustrating for designers. That's why I preferred working on business stuff the past months instead of concentrating on Zazzle. Just went in again and trying to get some few last-minute Xmas things up, but not stressing myself. Could've put more efforts to be in game for the Black Friday story, but after a moment of reflection I decided it's just not worth the hassle. The huge sales are a killer for designers, especially if you put a lot of work into every single design. Unless you're already established and able to sell significant quantities.
Posted: Monday, December 03, 2018 7:49:16 AM
I've never sold many Christmas designs, but I do sell a lot of what are obviously Christmas gifts. Each year I make a small number of Christmas designs, most of which don't sell, but it doesn't hurt to have them just in case.
Posted: Monday, December 03, 2018 8:22:43 PM
PetsDreamlands wrote:
Colorwash wrote:
PetsDreamlands wrote:
And if you raise the royalty to a non-dealbreaking 14.9%, the 15 ¢ will become 45.

In the best of worlds it'll be 45 cents, but there's nothing on Zazzle that isn't always on sale, the least being 15% off, and cards go on sale a lot. It may be better to jack up the royalty to something like 25%, particularly for holiday cards because they'll be on sale consistently prior to the holiday.
I'm well aware off, already had my 70%-off surprises. What's good for customers is frustrating for designers. That's why I preferred working on business stuff the past months instead of concentrating on Zazzle. Just went in again and trying to get some few last-minute Xmas things up, but not stressing myself. Could've put more efforts to be in game for the Black Friday story, but after a moment of reflection I decided it's just not worth the hassle. The huge sales are a killer for designers, especially if you put a lot of work into every single design. Unless you're already established and able to sell significant quantities.


I'm so sorry you feel this way. I fought with the same doubts and frustrations but have been surprisingly and enormously gratified to see one of my recent postcard designs, one that I did indeed put a lot of work into but had modest hopes for, having taken off (to the tune of 1794 and counting in quantity!). You never know. Sometimes it's worth the hassle, even with steep discounts, and I have found it to be more winner than killer! Grin
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