Zazzle product image sizes
Posted: Thursday, August 25, 2016 10:22:03 AM
Hi. I am trying to find a webpage containing all the required image sizes for all the Zazzle products. I had a link before, but it went missing after a reformat of my harddrive.

Can anyone post a link, please?
Thanks.
Posted: Saturday, August 27, 2016 10:59:47 AM
At the bottom of this page, in the black area, you will find many links to various things here at Zazzle. One of those is "HELP". Click on it and then click on "designers" and scroll down a bit to "design tips". Also when designing, each product will have in its description the size of area to be covered in that particular design. Using that info combined with the info found in the design tips mentioned above, should guide you.
Posted: Tuesday, August 30, 2016 11:59:35 AM
whatawonderfulworld wrote:
At the bottom of this page, in the black area, you will find many links to various things here at Zazzle. One of those is "HELP". Click on it and then click on "designers" and scroll down a bit to "design tips". Also when designing, each product will have in its description the size of area to be covered in that particular design. Using that info combined with the info found in the design tips mentioned above, should guide you.


WhatAWonderfulWorld hello. You mentioned that each product will have in its description the size of the area to be covered? Where in the description do you find this? I have been trying to find that and I don't notice it in the description. Thanks!
Posted: Tuesday, August 30, 2016 12:54:00 PM
Look at this product page, scrolling down just enough to see Zazzle's description where you'll find the exact dimensions of the clock: http://www.zazzle.com/quilted_stitch_in_time_saves_nine_in_navy_white_square_wall_clock-256500493853760476
Posted: Wednesday, August 31, 2016 5:28:23 PM
Thanks Colorwash. I noticed on the clock and I guess I was confused because for the t-shirts I was looking at I didn't see that. Thanks a bunch. I've noticed many of the old links to image/product guidelines have been removed for many of the other products and I was looking to make sure nothing changed for the t-shirts, but didn't find anything.

Thanks again!
Posted: Thursday, September 01, 2016 3:36:15 AM
Just make all your images large. They'll scale down nicely for smaller areas. If you design for specific sizes, you'll end up with many multiples of the same design, which is a waste of time and space. I generally use 3000 x 3000 ppi, though I sometimes go bigger if I know I'll want the design on a larger product.

In other words, you don't need to know the actual dimensions of the print area on every product. If the area is huge such as a shower curtain, you may have to run a test or two. Having various sizes of solid color squares for testing will help, but as time goes on, you'll find you don't need them.
Posted: Wednesday, January 31, 2018 2:08:32 PM
Product image sizes not at the bottom of page.
Can someone direct me or repost url please?
Posted: Wednesday, January 31, 2018 2:20:12 PM
Look in the “About this product” section of the product page. Many products have dimensions listed there. An image 3000x3000 at 300 dpi will work for many products. You can make it smaller or bigger, move it, and crop it in the design tool.
Posted: Tuesday, August 07, 2018 10:07:55 AM
Thank you for the above
Quote:
I generally use 3000 x 3000 ppi, though I sometimes go bigger if I know I'll want the design on a larger product.


If in Gimp I convert to cms, this comes out as only 25.4cm x 25.4cm. Does this mean that this is not suitable for a poster larger than this size. If so I seem to remember it is not big enough for even the smallest poster though zazzle doesn't flash up a warning.

I am confused by sizes. I did my store banner and it worked better at a smaller size than a larger one. ho hum. All help appreciated. And I see regulars here such as color wash. In my 2 weeks of using zazzle some of you have already been a great help Smile
Posted: Wednesday, August 08, 2018 4:09:08 AM
Katherine Owen wrote:
Thank you for the above
Quote:
I generally use 3000 x 3000 ppi, though I sometimes go bigger if I know I'll want the design on a larger product.


If in Gimp I convert to cms, this comes out as only 25.4cm x 25.4cm. Does this mean that this is not suitable for a poster larger than this size. If so I seem to remember it is not big enough for even the smallest poster though zazzle doesn't flash up a warning.

I am confused by sizes. I did my store banner and it worked better at a smaller size than a larger one. ho hum. All help appreciated. And I see regulars here such as color wash. In my 2 weeks of using zazzle some of you have already been a great help Smile

You're probably better off working exclusively in pixels per inch so as not worry about inches vs. centimeters. You can choose 300ppi as many of us do, and then if you create a 3000 pixel x 3000 pixel square, it'll be 10 inches x 10 inches or whatever the equivalent is in centimeters. No matter if you call it inches or centimeters, the physical size remains the same. The less math we have to do, the happier we are. :-)

Posted: Wednesday, August 08, 2018 4:26:03 AM
I wrote a detailed explanation together with some tips here:

https://forum.zazzle.com/create/pixel_dimensions?m=1532134#1532134
Posted: Wednesday, August 08, 2018 4:44:07 AM
Katherine Owen wrote:
Thank you for the above
Quote:
I generally use 3000 x 3000 ppi, though I sometimes go bigger if I know I'll want the design on a larger product.


If in Gimp I convert to cms, this comes out as only 25.4cm x 25.4cm. Does this mean that this is not suitable for a poster larger than this size. If so I seem to remember it is not big enough for even the smallest poster though zazzle doesn't flash up a warning.

I am confused by sizes. I did my store banner and it worked better at a smaller size than a larger one. ho hum. All help appreciated. And I see regulars here such as color wash. In my 2 weeks of using zazzle some of you have already been a great help Smile

Working on Zazzle it's best to work in inch and not cm. 1 inch = 2.54 cm. Posters are used to be printed at 150 DPI/PPI as common practice. That's 150 pixel per inch. So for a (US) standard large poster of 24x36" (inch) at the regular 150 DPI for such sizes you need an image that is 3600 pixel (24" x 150 dpi/ppi) x 5400 pixel (36" x 150 dpi/ppi). For accommodating posters up to 30x40" in both horizontal and vertical orientation I use to create square images of 6000x6000 pixel (that I can use also for other medium-large items such as pillows etc).

For large items such as shower curtains, medium+large blankets, duvets, large wall tapestries etc the (minimum) dpi/ppi required are 100 (more than enough for a good print). In these cases multiply the size in inches with 100 and you get the needed pixel. Read my detailed info about sizes and such here:
https://forum.zazzle.com/create/pixel_dimensions?m=1532134#1532134
Posted: Wednesday, August 08, 2018 6:18:37 AM
Dear Pets Dreamland, how very very kind. Thank you for the link through and the additional. I still don't understand Smile , but I will follow your advice.

I don't understand how a big image can get away with being a lower resolution. Surely it needs to have more detail because the detail is more exposed. Although I completely get that if they print at 150dpi there is no point in exceeding this.

Quote:
If your photos are at 6000 pixel size you can of course create just a 6000x6000 pixel works for all items that can be covered up to that size.

Does this mean that those I have done at 300dpi already then will be fine as is.

Quote:
for phone cases and similar sized objects, included 5x7" cards (if I block the 8.5x11") size


Is there a way to block one size? I wish there was a "only this size or smaller" option.

What a wonderfully professional store you have.

Sorry i didn't get back sooner. I don't know how to track the replies!

Thank you in abundance. This is fabulous advice.
Posted: Wednesday, August 08, 2018 7:03:17 AM
Katherine Owen wrote:
I don't understand how a big image can get away with being a lower resolution. Surely it needs to have more detail because the detail is more exposed.

My suggestion is to not worry about it. Just pick a resolution such as my 300ppi, and then make big images wherever possible. You'll do fine.
Posted: Wednesday, August 08, 2018 9:41:30 AM
Katherine Owen wrote:
Dear Pets Dreamland, how very very kind. Thank you for the link through and the additional. I still don't understand Smile , but I will follow your advice.

You're welcome. Don't worry, you will understand more and more with practice and experience and learning. I tried to be as understandable as possible but I know well it's way too much at once in that compressed form for someone who's just a beginner. Stick to the DPI/PPI versus product sizes references I listed to convert the design area sizes you find in the product descriptions into pixel. Google is your best friend when it comes to more info and learning understanding basics and YouTube is unbeatable for free and great tutorials when it comes to use image enhancing software such as Corel or Photoshop.

Katherine Owen wrote:
I don't understand how a big image can get away with being a lower resolution. Surely it needs to have more detail because the detail is more exposed. Although I completely get that if they print at 150dpi there is no point in exceeding this.

Simple. If you have a necklace or a greeting card with an image on it, you will look close and see every detail. The higher the resolution in DPI is, the finer the details. For these prints you use 300 DPI/PPI. If you look at a poster, you look from a distance, so that ultra fine line you notice on your greeting card you don't notice on that poster. Same with the material you are printing on. If you use fabric or fleece, no way that ultra fine line gets printed nor noticed if it would. Posters can be theoretically printed in 200 or 300 DPI, however not all do and 150 are more than enough. 150 are even pretty enough on writing paper if you don't have fine lines or text on it.

Other than that it's also a technical aspect, printer have limits, so do your camera and pc. Let's take that 24x36" poster as example. In a standard 150 resolution it's 3600x5400 pixel. That's pretty much for a photo but doable with a 12 to 20 megapixel camera. Let's assume you print that poster at 300 DPI/PPI. That would then be enormous 7200x10800 pixel for basically the same visible result. This would be 77.76 megapixel. There is hardly a payable cam around that offers you such a huge resolution. So you would have to enlarge your photos to that size, losing quality and the printer will then probably make them smaller again. Basides having fun working on such huge files on your pc.

Katherine Owen wrote:
Quote:
If your photos are at 6000 pixel size you can of course create just a 6000x6000 pixel works for all items that can be covered up to that size.

Does this mean that those I have done at 300dpi already then will be fine as is.

It depends with which inch size they come, 10x10"? Not enough. 20x20"? Yup, that fits. DPI/PPI only have a meaning if they're correlated with a real size in inches/cm. So if you've a 10x10" design at 300 DPI that would be the equivalent of 3000x3000 pixel, what wouldn't be enough for a blanket.

Forget these DPI/PPI when you create stuff for Zazzle. Zazzle's designer works in pixel and is dynamic. That means it adapts to different product sizes you can select separately, e.g. a small and a tall gift box with same design. On Zazzle you really need the DPI/PPI value ONLY to determine the minimum pixel you need for a specific product size that is given in inches. This, considering also the various size options you have for a specific product, if you use the same design. If a product comes e.g. in 10" and 20" size and has a requirement of 150 DPI/PPI, take the larger size as basis for your pixel conversion. That is 20" x 150 DPI = 3000 pixel. In that case the large 20" product is printed at the minimum resolution of 150 DPI (3000 pixel divided by 20") and the small 10" one at 300 DPI (3000 pixel divided by 10"). You see, the absolute 3000 pixel size remains on both product sizes, but the DPI/PPI value changes respectively.

Katherine Owen wrote:
Quote:
for phone cases and similar sized objects, included 5x7" cards (if I block the 8.5x11") size


Is there a way to block one size? I wish there was a "only this size or smaller" option.

There are some publishing options where you can exclude some models or sizes or styles etc. It depends on the product itself. You can choose the options when you publish the resp. product. Unfortunately there is no "This Size or smaller one", what I badly miss, especially on posters. The most available one is "This Size Only".

Katherine Owen wrote:
What a wonderfully professional store you have.

Sorry i didn't get back sooner. I don't know how to track the replies!

Thank you in abundance. This is fabulous advice.

Thanks, glad you like my style. Pretty fancy and colorful. For some too fancy, but they're countered by highly addicted fans, haha. Still working on backstage to get things ready to start, though. Will publish some new designs in the next days.

Don't worry for the later reply, I like it easy anyway ;-) always glad to help when I can. I'm also thankful, when others help me, so it's more than fair to give something in return.

Cheers and happy designing!
Posted: Wednesday, August 08, 2018 11:53:15 PM
Thank you both so much.
Quote:
If a product comes e.g. in 10" and 20" size and has a requirement of 150 DPI/PPI, take the larger size as basis for your pixel conversion. That is 20" x 150 DPI = 3000 pixel. In that case the large 20" product is printed at the minimum resolution of 150 DPI (3000 pixel divided by 20") and the small 10" one at 300 DPI (3000 pixel divided by 10"). You see, the absolute 3000 pixel size remains on both product sizes, but the DPI/PPI value changes respectively.


PD, this is so helpful. I hadn't realised that zazzle could print at a higher resolution (or should the language be a higher dpi/ppi) than the original submission. That makes sense though.

I am offline for a while but will go through it in more detail later or tomorrow. I suspect I will have more questions!!!!

Truly wonderful. Thank you so so much.
Posted: Thursday, August 09, 2018 2:47:45 AM
Katherine Owen wrote:
Thank you both so much.
Quote:
If a product comes e.g. in 10" and 20" size and has a requirement of 150 DPI/PPI, take the larger size as basis for your pixel conversion. That is 20" x 150 DPI = 3000 pixel. In that case the large 20" product is printed at the minimum resolution of 150 DPI (3000 pixel divided by 20") and the small 10" one at 300 DPI (3000 pixel divided by 10"). You see, the absolute 3000 pixel size remains on both product sizes, but the DPI/PPI value changes respectively.


PD, this is so helpful. I hadn't realised that zazzle could print at a higher resolution (or should the language be a higher dpi/ppi) than the original submission. That makes sense though.

I am offline for a while but will go through it in more detail later or tomorrow. I suspect I will have more questions!!!!

Truly wonderful. Thank you so so much.

A little correction to avoid misunderstandings: with printing the product at 150 and 300 I meant how the resolution of that image will be (pixel per inch) when printed at these different sizes. The printer itself prints always at it's own printer resolution of course, what will most certainly not differ on the same product but different size. It may also be that an image of 300 dpi/ppi exceeds the printer resolution and will be scaled down appropriately.

In other words: you can always submit larger images than really needed. If they are too big, they get automatically scaled down by the printer itself. So if you have a 6000 pixel portrait you made this big for a poster print, you can use the same image on a small necklace (that requests not even 600 pixel at the highest 300 DPI resolution) without much worries. You just can't go the other way, let's say using your 600 pixel necklace image for a pillow or poster. Not because the printer wouldn't print it, but because you risk to get literally a pixelated mosaic as a result.
Posted: Thursday, August 09, 2018 3:25:54 AM
Years ago when I was just beginning with digital imagery, I saw a metaphor that worked nicely for understanding size: Imagine a picture printed on a partially inflated balloon. The image is sharp, the contrast high, and the color strong. Then imagine what happens to that image and its qualities when the balloon is fully inflated. The result of a 250-pixel square image stretched to fit a 500-pixel square surface isn't good, not on a balloon and not on anything here on Zazzle.
Posted: Friday, August 10, 2018 1:44:35 AM
Thank you both again. Love
Color wash, I see I missed a thank you to you in the thread above ;-)
You have not only helped me here but also by my perusing of other threads before I posted. Smile
I LOVE your writer collection.

I do completely get the balloon image. That was my understanding. My confusion is with the following.

PD, you say
Quote:
In other words: you can always submit larger images than really needed. If they are too big, they get automatically scaled down by the printer itself.


I got worried that this wasn't the case and that distortion also took place from reducing the size of an image. When I did a store banner it looked no good when designed at a larger size and better when designed at a smaller size. This is just on my largish computer screen. Perhaps it looks no good on other screens ha ha.
So great to get confirmation of the above. Thank you.

ANOTHER QUESTION:
Is it ok to take an image eg a photograph and change it from 72dpi for example to 300dpi?
Does this communicate to zazzle that it is higher resolution image so that it may extend the image for a product and not flash up a warning. My concern is to not disappoint customers or let down zazzle and fellow designers by accidentally giving someone the option to choose an over extended image.

Please feel free both of you to give up answering!!!

Abundant thanks, Katherine
Posted: Friday, August 10, 2018 3:42:10 AM
It's the actual dimensions of the image that are calculated for the fit onto a product, not the ppi.

By the way, there's a method in Photoshop for changing something like 72ppi to 300ppi without the physical dimensions tripling, and though I don't know if it helps, I use the method without fail. It must be adding pixels where there were none originally, but this is something I'm not interested in learning about, preferring to leave open brain slots for information I can use. It's akin to clearing out the file drawer so we can find stuff in it.

Thanks for the compliment on my writer's series!
Posted: Friday, August 10, 2018 5:38:17 AM
Katherine Owen wrote:
I got worried that this wasn't the case and that distortion also took place from reducing the size of an image. When I did a store banner it looked no good when designed at a larger size and better when designed at a smaller size. This is just on my largish computer screen. Perhaps it looks no good on other screens ha ha.
So great to get confirmation of the above. Thank you.

When a printer reduces an image size/resolution that exceeds the printer's printing capabilities it does it maintaining the ratio of course and doesn't distort anything. The quality loss due to the reducing is also negligible, all what matters in terms of quality is the resolution used at printing (see newspapers of 3 and more decades ago which were printed in very small resolution and black and white, what resulted in visible dots).

In case of your store banner, the large image you had created may have had a different aspect ratio than the banner and the script that manages to fit the image into the banner may have used a stretching technique, without maintaining the ratio. What would result in a distorted image. In webdesign you can choose how you want to fit an image into a predefined display area. Usually you fill in the image maintaining the ratio and crop the exceeding parts. That's how the designer's "Fill" image property works. That said, it's always better to provide an exactly sized image whenever possible, so it gets printed/displayed at 100% and no changes are made at all (well, so to speak, because most websites resample the images you upload, e.g. facebook).

Katherine Owen wrote:
Is it ok to take an image eg a photograph and change it from 72dpi for example to 300dpi?
Does this communicate to zazzle that it is higher resolution image so that it may extend the image for a product and not flash up a warning. My concern is to not disappoint customers or let down zazzle and fellow designers by accidentally giving someone the option to choose an over extended image.

Changing a DPI resolution of an image without changing the effective image size in pixel does absolutely nothing. Let's say if you have a 1000 pixel image and need a 3000 pixel one, changing its ppi from 72 to 300 without resizing it, results in a still 1000 pixel image that is still too small for the work and will still give a warning.

The only use of changing only the dpi/ppi value without resizing is when you have to send that image directly to a printing device. In that case the dpi/ppi tells the printer how many pixel have to be printed on each inch. So, if you take a 3000 pixel image and set the resolution to 100 dpi/ppi, the printer prints it to an extent of 30" (3000":100dpi). If you set the dpi/ppi to 300, the image will be 10" tall when printed (3000:300).

Cheers!
Posted: Friday, August 10, 2018 5:52:56 AM
Colorwash wrote:
It's the actual dimensions of the image that are calculated for the fit onto a product, not the ppi.

Correct.

Colorwash wrote:
By the way, there's a method in Photoshop for changing something like 72ppi to 300ppi without the physical dimensions tripling, and though I don't know if it helps, I use the method without fail. It must be adding pixels where there were none originally...

Yep, same in Corel. You can just change the resolution value without touching the effective pixel size. All this function does is setting this value, what tells finally the printer the resolution the image has to be printed (as I explained in my previous reply, last paragraph). For Zazzle's designer it has no effect at all. So, if you have that 4000 pixel photo that is saved at 72dpi, you don't need to change any dpi/ppi value if a 4000 pixel photo is what you need. No one forbids you to change it to 300, of course, if you enjoy wasting your time. ;-)
Posted: Friday, August 10, 2018 6:38:23 AM
PetsDreamlands wrote:
Colorwash wrote:
By the way, there's a method in Photoshop for changing something like 72ppi to 300ppi without the physical dimensions tripling, and though I don't know if it helps, I use the method without fail. It must be adding pixels where there were none originally...

No one forbids you to change it to 300, of course, if you enjoy wasting your time. ;-)

Years back when photography was my thing, I worked with one of the major photo sites. One thing I learned while there was to set photos to 300ppi, particularly since that's what the photo printing businesses required. It's what my local print lab still requires. Maybe you think it's a waste of time, but not everyone does.
Posted: Friday, August 10, 2018 7:26:12 AM
Colorwash wrote:
PetsDreamlands wrote:
Colorwash wrote:
By the way, there's a method in Photoshop for changing something like 72ppi to 300ppi without the physical dimensions tripling, and though I don't know if it helps, I use the method without fail. It must be adding pixels where there were none originally...

No one forbids you to change it to 300, of course, if you enjoy wasting your time. ;-)

Years back when photography was my thing, I worked with one of the major photo sites. One thing I learned while there was to set photos to 300ppi, particularly since that's what the photo printing businesses required. It's what my local print lab still requires. Maybe you think it's a waste of time, but not everyone does.

If that photo printing service requires photos in 300ppi to get their job done, you send them that photo in 300ppi. That's what I do in my job. Sending the printing services the ready-to-print files as required, depending on the stuff you have to print. This includes image resolution, bleed sizes, color profiles etc. When I design a large 6x3 meter billboard the requirements for the file at that specific printing company are 1/10 of the billboard size (=60x30cm) at 300 DPI, as example. Sublimation printing requires often max 150 or 200 dpi. So, yes, in these cases you have to work with specific resolutions. But we're talking of the Zazzle designer here, and that one uses pixel and dynamic sizes (remember you can often change the product's size and the designer recalculates and rearranges the content), so changing the dpi/ppi value is an unnecessary step that doesn't do anything.

In other words: if you have to provide your image in pixel, you can forget the whole dpi/ppi stuff and directly work in pixel. If you have to provide your design/printing file in inches with images at a specific resolution, you need to declare both, the image size(s) in inches plus the requested dpi/ppi resolution.
Posted: Friday, August 10, 2018 7:46:17 AM
from CW
Quote:
, but this is something I'm not interested in learning about, preferring to leave open brain slots for information I can use. It's akin to clearing out the file drawer so we can find stuff in it.


Oh how I relate! :-)

Posted: Friday, August 10, 2018 7:46:20 AM
from CW
Quote:
, but this is something I'm not interested in learning about, preferring to leave open brain slots for information I can use. It's akin to clearing out the file drawer so we can find stuff in it.


Oh how I relate! :-)

Posted: Friday, August 10, 2018 8:33:11 AM
Ok lovely PD and CW, I thought I had this and now I come back to it and I am re reading your kind instructions over and over and my head is hurting! Doh. I think I need to ask a question from the opposite direction.

Many of my images are 2000 x 3000 and 300dpi. Not ideal for zazzle and the squares you recommend but that's how they were for cards on redbubble.

Here is zazzle's list of poster sizes from here.
[url=https://help.zazzle.com/hc/en-gb/articles/219869607-Poster-and-Print-Sizes-Explained[/url]

12" x 16" 30.48 x 40.64 cm 1800 x 2400 pixels
16" x 20" 40.64 x 50.80 cm 2400 x 3000 pixels
18" x 24" 45.72 x 60.92 cm 2700 x 3600 pixels
19" x 13" 48.26 x 33.02 cm 2850 x 1950 pixels
20" x 24" 50.80 x 60.92 cm 3000 x 3600 pixels
24" x 24" 60.92 x 60.92 cm 3600 x 3600 pixels
12" x 36" 30.48 x 91.44 cm 1800 x 5400 pixels
24" x 36" 60.92 x 91.44 cm 3600 x 5400 pixels


So it looks like mine are only ok for the first poster on this list. Is that correct?

In fact, PD your recommendation in the linked to info was

Quote:
2200x2200 pixel for phone cases and similar sized objects, included 5x7" cards (if I block the 8.5x11") size


So you are saying that my image size isn't even safe for all cards, which is a shame.

As these 2:3 ratio images are already done I would like to use them before making others. They are not photographs but on a coloured background with text so my understanding is that it is safe to scale them up and redo the text and any features such as lighting. Is that correct.

Also PD. You say dpi doesn’t matter, but am I correct that what you still can do and need to do is – if need be – change up from 72dpi to the minimum 150dpi stated as required by zazzle or in some cases 200 or 300? The table you linked through to above stated the dpi needed. eg

Quote:
For small products up to a greeting card size, use 300 DPI for best results.
Example: 5x7" card at 300 DPI = (5x300) x (7x300) pixel = 1500x2100 pixel. Add maybe 100 pixel each size for a bleed.


But now you seem to be saying DPI doesn't matter and changing it is a waste of time. Help! Please explain to my addled brain.

Smile Love Thank you Thank you.

PS. sorry about the duplicate post above!


Posted: Friday, August 10, 2018 9:28:36 AM
Katherine, our dear PetsDreamland is stuffing your file drawer beyond overflowing! Laughing

Here's what I do wherever possible: If I'm going for a landscape orientation, I most often use 4000 x 3000 pixels, and when it's portrait, I just flip the numbers and use 3000 x 4000. This works for most of Zazzle's products. Duvets and shower curtains are an entirely different story. For them, I use graphics that have transparent backgrounds so I can shift them around and choose colored backgrounds, shapes, and text.

Everyone is different in the kinds of images they use, but maybe just starting out with the numbers I use will get you going.

One thing that's helpful is to make sure there's room on all four sides of an image for cropping so that, even if the shape you're placing it on is slightly different from the basic shape of your image, the natural cropping caused by the product's shape won't effect the main focus of your image.

Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.
Print this topic
RSS Feed
Normal
Threaded