Muted Colors 3 pages: 1 [2] 3
Posted: Sunday, January 06, 2019 10:30:17 AM
I found a pretty good article on what I am talking about. The image in the top right hand corner is very close to what I mean.

This image also represents what I am getting at. And this one too.

Or just look at the front page of Z today to understand what I mean.
Posted: Sunday, January 06, 2019 12:16:55 PM
Just to encourage that there are still people who buy the popping colors this is what sold from one of my stores on 12/28.



So if you do add muted colors, keep your super colorful stuff too!
Posted: Sunday, January 06, 2019 4:15:01 PM
lol, I just sold this tie this evening



it's sold multiple times

I've played around with the faded and grungy look but I favor colorful and vivid when designing.
Posted: Sunday, January 06, 2019 7:48:41 PM
Personally, I love bright colors, and I tend to design with them more often than not. I think most of what I've sold so far has been bright colored designs. So, yeah, I think maybe it would be nice if Z would mix it up a bit instead of featuring the muted colors most of the time.
Posted: Sunday, January 06, 2019 7:53:11 PM
Great tie Jerry! Congrats!Roses
Posted: Monday, January 07, 2019 2:39:57 AM
I was really curious so I checked one of my best selling products that I have two variations of. Bright Jewel colors and more pastel (muted) colors and the the differences in sales are very dramatic. 84% of the sales of that product are Jewel colors leaving a poor sales total of only 16% of the pastel/muted tones.

Posted: Monday, January 07, 2019 8:16:49 AM
Focusing on what Z shows on the home page is of no help to me. It's not my design aesthetic, and there would be little point in my trying to adopt it and compete with the elite group of designers that seem to have a stranglehold on the front page and its promoted products. The diversity that exists here is very poorly represented there. My only hope is the search algorithm helping out people looking for something different.
Posted: Monday, January 07, 2019 10:42:29 AM
Fuzzy Felosarix wrote:
Focusing on what Z shows on the home page is of no help to me. It's not my design aesthetic, and there would be little point in my trying to adopt it and compete with the elite group of designers that seem to have a stranglehold on the front page and its promoted products. The diversity that exists here is very poorly represented there. My only hope is the search algorithm helping out people looking for something different.


Yeah, I guess that is my resolution on the matter. I'm an old dog, and you know what they say about old dogs and new tricks.

I am mostly referring to the promo emails, though they basically mirror the front page.

I also wish that the marketing here could be more diverse, like it used to be. Judging by their promos and front page I would consider Zazzle a website for women, in the same category as Marie Claire or Cosmopolitan, and they are totally not that. Zazzle is a diverse marketplace for everyone and they should represent themselves as such imho.

As a casual consumer, particularly a male shopper, Zazzle doesn't seem to market to me or appeal to me on its surface. But as a designer here at Zazzle, that understands the ecosystem, I would like to remain as relevant and germane to the platform as possible.

I suppose that if I do decide to dive into paper this year I will play around with several color combos and try to invent my own styles. The paper stuff that I have published here in the past wasn't really inspired by anything that already existed and it has done better than I expected it would. I guess my biggest challenge is figuring out sets. I struggle with doing paper sets.
Posted: Monday, January 07, 2019 11:23:43 AM
Jerry Lambert wrote:
I guess my biggest challenge is figuring out sets. I struggle with doing paper sets.

Do you mean stationery? It's something I tried and quickly realized it's tedious to create. Also, and from what I can see, much of what's promoted here is all woven of the same cloth. Are you sure you want to delve into that?
Posted: Monday, January 07, 2019 12:21:47 PM
Jerry Lambert wrote:
I am mostly referring to the promo emails, though they basically mirror the front page.

Ah, I see. To be honest, if an email from Zazzle isn't informing me that my products have been published or that I've sold something, I tend to ignore it/send it straight to the trash. None of it speaks to me, so I stopped reading those emails long ago.

Jerry Lambert wrote:
Judging by their promos and front page I would consider Zazzle a website for women.

I also get the impression that most designers here are women, so maybe that's a factor? Or maybe it's just that women designers are more active in the forum than men.

I just can't get into the paper thing. Seems like a lot of work for a low return on the investment of one's time (plus there's the $0 royalty thing, since paper tends to have a lower price point than goods with a more permanent existence.) Z's tilt toward paper as their main product just leaves me out in the cold. I understand it, but it's so not my thing. I'll leave it to those who know what they're doing.
Posted: Monday, January 07, 2019 12:57:29 PM
I was surprised when I decided to make some paper products that they sell as well as they do.

namely stationery, labels, paper napkins and plates, business cards and moving announcement postcards.

These items sell in bulk repeatedly, mostly on only a few of my bestselling designs.

I am so disappointed in how wall art doesn't sell much, because if it did I would design more of it and less of the paper products.

Adding: because I am more of an artist than a designer...
Posted: Monday, January 07, 2019 6:02:39 PM
Colorwash wrote:
Jerry Lambert wrote:
I guess my biggest challenge is figuring out sets. I struggle with doing paper sets.

Do you mean stationery? It's something I tried and quickly realized it's tedious to create. Also, and from what I can see, much of what's promoted here is all woven of the same cloth. Are you sure you want to delve into that?


I mean like party stuff, weddings, birthdays, baby showers... all of the stuff that diamond level designers do, lol.

And I probably don't want to immerse myself into it but I if I decide to do it I will either make an effort, decide that I suck at it and give up or become totally obsessed with it. I have another project on the burner right now that will probably take all of the winter to complete and then I will need something to move on to. It seems that paper is the key to success here these days.
Posted: Monday, January 07, 2019 7:07:08 PM
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
I am so disappointed in how wall art doesn't sell much

You and me both.
Posted: Tuesday, January 08, 2019 3:31:22 AM
Fuzzy Felosarix wrote:
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
I am so disappointed in how wall art doesn't sell much

You and me both.

What I discovered about wall art is that it must have a "purpose" to sell. I hit on this accidentally when I started putting my music theory designs on posters. They're for musicians and students who need a ready reference right there on the wall. Every once in a great while, a poster calendar will sell, but it's rare that anything "just for pretty" goes anywhere. Posters apparently need focus, one for specific people doing specific things. A chart of weights and measures for the kitchen, for instance, might sell far better than a gorgeous vegetable still life.
Posted: Tuesday, January 08, 2019 3:50:00 AM
I keep an eye on Pinterest for what’s popular. However, muted isn’t ‘me’ so I still find myself defaulting to bright colours. I must try to stay more focused on what sells rather than what I like.
Posted: Tuesday, January 08, 2019 4:46:32 AM
Jerry Lambert wrote:


I mean like party stuff, weddings, birthdays, baby showers... all of the stuff that diamond level designers do, lol.

And I probably don't want to immerse myself into it but I if I decide to do it I will either make an effort, decide that I suck at it and give up or become totally obsessed with it. I have another project on the burner right now that will probably take all of the winter to complete and then I will need something to move on to. It seems that paper is the key to success here these days.


For weddings it seems you really have to go all in. Not only must you design the invitations but there are the response cards, save-the-date cards,,thank you cards et. etc. etc. So much stuff that it has its own department. It's so much commitment to one design concept that if your concept fails, three dozen or so products fail along with it. I'm just not ready for such a design commitment, especially with such daunting diamond level competition.

I have had a some success with one-off paper where you don't need a giant suite of products all with related design; we've moved postcards, cocktail party invites, that sort of thing. My mid-size suites of birthday products (invites with matching paper plates, napkins, favor bags and other party stuff) bombed terribly. I tend towards the florid and artsy which just works better for one-off electronics and other things that don't have to match.
Posted: Tuesday, January 08, 2019 8:07:57 AM
Colorwash wrote:
Fuzzy Felosarix wrote:
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
I am so disappointed in how wall art doesn't sell much

You and me both.

What I discovered about wall art is that it must have a "purpose" to sell. I hit on this accidentally when I started putting my music theory designs on posters. They're for musicians and students who need a ready reference right there on the wall. Every once in a great while, a poster calendar will sell, but it's rare that anything "just for pretty" goes anywhere. Posters apparently need focus, one for specific people doing specific things. A chart of weights and measures for the kitchen, for instance, might sell far better than a gorgeous vegetable still life.

A wall clock would be another item for comparison. I get way more views on my clocks than my wall art, even though the art is the same or similar. It makes sense that an item having both an aesthetic and a practical purpose would be more likely to sell.

Enlightening. I've seriously thought of just quitting wall art altogether.

I was also reading something yesterday that indicated size matters, as in it needs to be big enough to hang over a couch and occupy a significant portion of the wall above it. The argument made was that people see it as getting more bang for their buck than buying a smaller item. This would also probably indicate something in landscape format, versus portrait format or square. I don't do anything on that scale, and almost never in landscape format.

It's also the exact opposite of what my husband and I typically buy. We like smaller pieces that we can move around as the mood suits us. We only have two large pieces - one he inherited from a grandmother that sits on the mantle, and one he bought years ago that hangs - guess where? Above the couch.

An example of needing to get out of one's own head space when it comes to designing.
Posted: Tuesday, January 08, 2019 8:13:37 AM
Susannah Keegan wrote:
For weddings it seems you really have to go all in. Not only must you design the invitations but there are the response cards, save-the-date cards,,thank you cards et. etc. etc. So much stuff that it has its own department. It's so much commitment to one design concept that if your concept fails, three dozen or so products fail along with it. I'm just not ready for such a design commitment, especially with such daunting diamond level competition.

Yes - this exactly ^.
Posted: Tuesday, January 08, 2019 9:24:58 AM
Today I sold cute and muted. It was likely for a childs birthday with a party of 10. It is nice to see invitations, paper plate, favor boxes, stickers listed in multiples. Woohoo!


I know, this is no indication of one way or the other ...

Posted: Tuesday, January 08, 2019 11:15:41 AM
Fuzzy Felosarix wrote:
Colorwash wrote:
Fuzzy Felosarix wrote:
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
I am so disappointed in how wall art doesn't sell much

You and me both.

What I discovered about wall art is that it must have a "purpose" to sell. I hit on this accidentally when I started putting my music theory designs on posters. They're for musicians and students who need a ready reference right there on the wall. Every once in a great while, a poster calendar will sell, but it's rare that anything "just for pretty" goes anywhere. Posters apparently need focus, one for specific people doing specific things. A chart of weights and measures for the kitchen, for instance, might sell far better than a gorgeous vegetable still life.

A wall clock would be another item for comparison. I get way more views on my clocks than my wall art, even though the art is the same or similar. It makes sense that an item having both an aesthetic and a practical purpose would be more likely to sell.

Enlightening. I've seriously thought of just quitting wall art altogether.

I was also reading something yesterday that indicated size matters, as in it needs to be big enough to hang over a couch and occupy a significant portion of the wall above it. The argument made was that people see it as getting more bang for their buck than buying a smaller item. This would also probably indicate something in landscape format, versus portrait format or square. I don't do anything on that scale, and almost never in landscape format.

It's also the exact opposite of what my husband and I typically buy. We like smaller pieces that we can move around as the mood suits us. We only have two large pieces - one he inherited from a grandmother that sits on the mantle, and one he bought years ago that hangs - guess where? Above the couch.

An example of needing to get out of one's own head space when it comes to designing.


I've tried all sizes including making a lot of Triptychs and all I have ever sold were a few mid-size posters. (so far and knock wood) I am not giving up though but rather going with the idea that maybe if I had more to offer I would get more sales... but it is discouraging that wall art doesn't sell well at other sites either... I guess people think why buy someone else's art when now days you can make your own? but I keep trying to entice them anyway...




Posted: Tuesday, January 08, 2019 11:16:04 AM
vivendulies wrote:
Today I sold cute and muted. It was likely for a childs birthday with a party of 10. It is nice to see invitations, paper plate, favor boxes, stickers listed in multiples. Woohoo!



I know, this is no indication of one way or the other ...

well done! Roses
Posted: Tuesday, January 08, 2019 7:35:08 PM
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
Fuzzy Felosarix wrote:
Colorwash wrote:
Fuzzy Felosarix wrote:
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
I am so disappointed in how wall art doesn't sell much

You and me both.

What I discovered about wall art is that it must have a "purpose" to sell. I hit on this accidentally when I started putting my music theory designs on posters. They're for musicians and students who need a ready reference right there on the wall. Every once in a great while, a poster calendar will sell, but it's rare that anything "just for pretty" goes anywhere. Posters apparently need focus, one for specific people doing specific things. A chart of weights and measures for the kitchen, for instance, might sell far better than a gorgeous vegetable still life.

A wall clock would be another item for comparison. I get way more views on my clocks than my wall art, even though the art is the same or similar. It makes sense that an item having both an aesthetic and a practical purpose would be more likely to sell.

Enlightening. I've seriously thought of just quitting wall art altogether.

I was also reading something yesterday that indicated size matters, as in it needs to be big enough to hang over a couch and occupy a significant portion of the wall above it. The argument made was that people see it as getting more bang for their buck than buying a smaller item. This would also probably indicate something in landscape format, versus portrait format or square. I don't do anything on that scale, and almost never in landscape format.

It's also the exact opposite of what my husband and I typically buy. We like smaller pieces that we can move around as the mood suits us. We only have two large pieces - one he inherited from a grandmother that sits on the mantle, and one he bought years ago that hangs - guess where? Above the couch.

An example of needing to get out of one's own head space when it comes to designing.


I've tried all sizes including making a lot of Triptychs and all I have ever sold were a few mid-size posters. (so far and knock wood) I am not giving up though but rather going with the idea that maybe if I had more to offer I would get more sales... but it is discouraging that wall art doesn't sell well at other sites either... I guess people think why buy someone else's art when now days you can make your own? but I keep trying to entice them anyway...

I had 5 pieces in a gallery last June: A banner, a wood print, a frisbee, a standing paperweight, and a clock.

And what sold? The clock. I really think Colorwash is onto something. Practical sells probably far more often than pretty.

Another thing the article mentioned that I was reading was reputation. It was aimed more at people trying to sell paintings, but it made sense. There's the reputation of the artist, the reputation of the gallery (translation - where the art is seen/sold), and the reputation of the buyer. Artists selling paintings don't have a built-in reputation. They get one through their association with a reputable gallery, are by having their stuff bought by someone of reputation. You can have the most perfectly executed work, but if no one knows anything about you, what do you think you're going to get for it - if you can sell it at all?

Somehow I just don't see Zazzle's reputation as something that lifts ours. So where's a rich patron of the arts when you need one? Laughing
Posted: Tuesday, January 08, 2019 8:40:02 PM
Fuzzy Felosarix wrote:
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
Fuzzy Felosarix wrote:
Colorwash wrote:
Fuzzy Felosarix wrote:
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
I am so disappointed in how wall art doesn't sell much

You and me both.

What I discovered about wall art is that it must have a "purpose" to sell. I hit on this accidentally when I started putting my music theory designs on posters. They're for musicians and students who need a ready reference right there on the wall. Every once in a great while, a poster calendar will sell, but it's rare that anything "just for pretty" goes anywhere. Posters apparently need focus, one for specific people doing specific things. A chart of weights and measures for the kitchen, for instance, might sell far better than a gorgeous vegetable still life.

A wall clock would be another item for comparison. I get way more views on my clocks than my wall art, even though the art is the same or similar. It makes sense that an item having both an aesthetic and a practical purpose would be more likely to sell.

Enlightening. I've seriously thought of just quitting wall art altogether.

I was also reading something yesterday that indicated size matters, as in it needs to be big enough to hang over a couch and occupy a significant portion of the wall above it. The argument made was that people see it as getting more bang for their buck than buying a smaller item. This would also probably indicate something in landscape format, versus portrait format or square. I don't do anything on that scale, and almost never in landscape format.

It's also the exact opposite of what my husband and I typically buy. We like smaller pieces that we can move around as the mood suits us. We only have two large pieces - one he inherited from a grandmother that sits on the mantle, and one he bought years ago that hangs - guess where? Above the couch.

An example of needing to get out of one's own head space when it comes to designing.


I've tried all sizes including making a lot of Triptychs and all I have ever sold were a few mid-size posters. (so far and knock wood) I am not giving up though but rather going with the idea that maybe if I had more to offer I would get more sales... but it is discouraging that wall art doesn't sell well at other sites either... I guess people think why buy someone else's art when now days you can make your own? but I keep trying to entice them anyway...

I had 5 pieces in a gallery last June: A banner, a wood print, a frisbee, a standing paperweight, and a clock.

And what sold? The clock. I really think Colorwash is onto something. Practical sells probably far more often than pretty.

Another thing the article mentioned that I was reading was reputation. It was aimed more at people trying to sell paintings, but it made sense. There's the reputation of the artist, the reputation of the gallery (translation - where the art is seen/sold), and the reputation of the buyer. Artists selling paintings don't have a built-in reputation. They get one through their association with a reputable gallery, are by having their stuff bought by someone of reputation. You can have the most perfectly executed work, but if no one knows anything about you, what do you think you're going to get for it - if you can sell it at all?

Somehow I just don't see Zazzle's reputation as something that lifts ours. So where's a rich patron of the arts when you need one? Laughing


well I must have been on the wave length because I made a clock today...Stick out tongue
Posted: Tuesday, January 08, 2019 8:58:06 PM
Colorwash wrote:
Fuzzy Felosarix wrote:
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
I am so disappointed in how wall art doesn't sell much

You and me both.

What I discovered about wall art is that it must have a "purpose" to sell. I hit on this accidentally when I started putting my music theory designs on posters. They're for musicians and students who need a ready reference right there on the wall. Every once in a great while, a poster calendar will sell, but it's rare that anything "just for pretty" goes anywhere. Posters apparently need focus, one for specific people doing specific things. A chart of weights and measures for the kitchen, for instance, might sell far better than a gorgeous vegetable still life.


I think you're absolutely right on that. Pictures with a purpose sell best.
Posted: Tuesday, January 08, 2019 9:09:40 PM
Fuzzy Felosarix wrote:
Susannah Keegan wrote:
For weddings it seems you really have to go all in. Not only must you design the invitations but there are the response cards, save-the-date cards,,thank you cards et. etc. etc. So much stuff that it has its own department. It's so much commitment to one design concept that if your concept fails, three dozen or so products fail along with it. I'm just not ready for such a design commitment, especially with such daunting diamond level competition.

Yes - this exactly ^.


I've been getting more into the wedding department, as I know it sells, and I want to have products that sell in my stores. Not that I want to sell out, or anything. I still have to remain true to my own style, and I think I'm coming along nicely with that. I like where things are going in terms of my designs. We'll see what happens. I definitely don't want to copy what everyone else is doing. I've always danced the beat of my own drum. I still have yet to finish out a collection with my wedding designs.
Posted: Tuesday, January 08, 2019 9:24:46 PM
Karen Coffelt wrote:
Fuzzy Felosarix wrote:
Susannah Keegan wrote:
For weddings it seems you really have to go all in. Not only must you design the invitations but there are the response cards, save-the-date cards,,thank you cards et. etc. etc. So much stuff that it has its own department. It's so much commitment to one design concept that if your concept fails, three dozen or so products fail along with it. I'm just not ready for such a design commitment, especially with such daunting diamond level competition.

Yes - this exactly ^.


I've been getting more into the wedding department, as I know it sells, and I want to have products that sell in my stores. Not that I want to sell out, or anything. I still have to remain true to my own style, and I think I'm coming along nicely with that. I like where things are going in terms of my designs. We'll see what happens. I definitely don't want to copy what everyone else is doing. I've always danced the beat of my own drum. I still have yet to finish out a collection with my wedding designs.


I don't think creating wedding items necessarily equates with selling out, especially if you can work your own style into it. But there is a risk that they won't sell... I made some that I think are different and unique and they are going nowhere fast. lol! But just because they don't appeal to the masses doesn't mean somebody won't like them it they could just see them... Shocked

Posted: Wednesday, January 09, 2019 3:33:01 AM
This reminds me of when people ask what are people's bestselling products, probably hoping to find out where they ought to focus their efforts. (Not speaking of you, Jerry.) The inquiries are inevitably met with disparate answers, one person saying their cards sell best, another saying it's pillows, a third saying phone cases, a fourth luggage tags, and so on. What sells best for people depends more on their design style than on where they place their designs.
Posted: Wednesday, January 09, 2019 8:38:43 AM
Colorwash wrote:
This reminds me of when people ask what are people's bestselling products, probably hoping to find out where they ought to focus their efforts. (Not speaking of you, Jerry.) The inquiries are inevitably met with disparate answers, one person saying their cards sell best, another saying it's pillows, a third saying phone cases, a fourth luggage tags, and so on. What sells best for people depends more on their design style than on where they place their designs.

I think to some extent it matters whether the products chosen are a good fit for the style of the art. It's certainly not a hard and fast rule, though. Sometimes defying the expected works, sometimes it's an utter failure. It can be genius, or end up a regretful "What was I thinking?"

As an example of an exception, would most brides choose a zombie theme for the suite of products they'll need for a wedding? Probably not; there's a lot of tradition surrounding weddings, and it endures because people perpetuate the traditions. However, the zombie genre goes through periods of popularity, and seems to always have a solid and enduring fan base. You can find zombie-themed wedding products on Zazzle. Do they sell? I suspect they do, but it's a niche market.

So maybe it's a choice between trying to compete with traditional wedding themes with your own artistic spin, or figuring out whether your art fits an under-served niche with less competition, and seeing whether you can successfully adapt it to those products. Then figuring out where/how to market them.

I think we all know this stuff, but sometimes forget it when we get caught up in the artistic process, and enthusiastically start choosing products with less than careful consideration. Wedding suites especially take a fair amount of planning and thought, do they not? It's sure more than I would ever want to take on (but then I got married in a courthouse during a trial's recess for lunch, avoiding all the wedding ceremony and reception planning.)

For those who want to take on wedding designing, I admire your 'intestinal fortitude', even if I do think it would make me totally nuts (it's a short trip, I know. Grin )
Posted: Wednesday, January 09, 2019 10:27:10 AM
Fuzzy Felosarix wrote:
For those who want to take on wedding designing, I admire your 'intestinal fortitude', even if I do think it would make me totally nuts (it's a short trip, I know. Grin )

I very quickly lost my mind when trying to do wedding suites. It's so utterly not my thing, and I don't know why I didn't realize it before even trying. I hate weddings, even my own. Really, what was I thinking?
Posted: Thursday, January 10, 2019 3:39:40 AM
I do my own thing I am on the bright and happy side of color. Somethings do well some not so much everything it is all a bit of trial and error best thing about zazzle is you can trial colors and designs to hearts delight Grin

I have my style and I am too stubborn to follow closely all the trends. Personally I like to go my own way and do my own thing. The market is full of other creators following trends grabbing stock art and creating similar things. I like to think I am doing something a bit different by creating my art and design from scratch for me that is what matters. Love
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