More evidence our Descriptions aren't being read?
Posted: Tuesday, October 31, 2017 5:50:30 PM
On the Ornament I just opened, instead of

• Product
• Descriptions
• Collections
• Other Designs

The order is

• Product
• Collections
• Other Designs
• Descriptions

It looks a little cluttered to me and a bit Amazonian, but I suppose if it helps customers find matching products and they like it, that's what matters, right? And as long as Collections rank higher on the page than Other Designs. Grin

Posted: Wednesday, November 01, 2017 6:03:48 AM
I assume the only real purpose descriptions serve is SEO-related, not customer-related.
Posted: Wednesday, November 01, 2017 6:20:45 AM
Fuzzy Felosarix wrote:
I assume the only real purpose descriptions serve is SEO-related, not customer-related.

Suspecting customers never read our descriptions--they can't find the forest for the trees, and if they could, they're likely immune to hyperbole--I often write my descriptions with only SEO in mind: Important keywords formed into sentences.
Posted: Monday, January 07, 2019 3:53:01 PM
Colorwash wrote:
Fuzzy Felosarix wrote:
I assume the only real purpose descriptions serve is SEO-related, not customer-related.

Suspecting customers never read our descriptions--they can't find the forest for the trees, and if they could, they're likely immune to hyperbole--I often write my descriptions with only SEO in mind: Important keywords formed into sentences.


Hi Colorwash. Is it also OK to assume that since the descriptions are for SEO, it's good to include the product type and personalization info (or is it customization?)? I get that they shouldn't be in the title or tags. Now. Have I asked a question about tagging, etc., 99 times or only 98? Stick out tongue
Posted: Monday, January 07, 2019 4:28:42 PM
I always assume that for every shopper who doesn't read the description there is at least one that does, so I try to write for human reading and SEO both.

I am the type of online shopper who never buys anything without reading everything there is to read about it, and I know I am not the only one.
Posted: Monday, January 07, 2019 4:56:31 PM
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:

I am the type of online shopper who never buys anything without reading everything there is to read about it, and I know I am not the only one.


And I'm the type that DOESN'T and then end up with a device that ONLY works on 2.4 ghz when I have a router that REFUSES to acknowledge 2.4...
Posted: Monday, January 07, 2019 5:21:24 PM
I sell on Zazzle, but I'm also a Zshopper.

I typically don't really care about the seller/design description, unless there's a specific question I had about the actual design, like "Who is the original artist?" or "What medium was this art made in?"

I will read the base product description thoroughly though because that's where the important specs are (dimensions, material, etc.)

Like Fuzzy, I always thought it was more for SEO purposes. I'm more of a visual shopper. If I like the design, I will buy it regardless of what the seller wrote in the description. I couldn't care less about that. It could be empty (if possible) and I will still buy it.
Posted: Monday, January 07, 2019 5:34:14 PM
I read technical specs and item lists, I skip schmooze and flattery or boasting as an online shopper and I still bought boxes that are too small or too big and bought the wrong item because of the image, when the description would have told me what they actually offer, like the external drive in separate parts for tech savvies with the tools to assemble the darn thing.
Grin
Posted: Monday, January 07, 2019 5:37:34 PM
I don't read designer descriptions. I wish we didn't have to write them. I only write them so I can say I created the design. Yeah I toss in others bit of info, but only for there to be more written than the statement that I created the design lol
Posted: Monday, January 07, 2019 6:00:28 PM
Gina ©gleem wrote:
I don't read designer descriptions. I wish we didn't have to write them. I only write them so I can say I created the design. Yeah I toss in others bit of info, but only for there to be more written than the statement that I created the design lol


My English prof would probably smack me with an F for my incomplete sentences in my descriptions.

And I dearly wish we had paragraphs so that I can separate the repetition of keywords in that first incomplete sentence from essential information on what is not obvious to the human eye and only reveals itself if open the zazzle tool and can comprehend basic design tools with layers and objects with editable properties.
Posted: Monday, January 07, 2019 6:33:36 PM
vivendulies wrote:
Gina ©gleem wrote:
I don't read designer descriptions. I wish we didn't have to write them. I only write them so I can say I created the design. Yeah I toss in others bit of info, but only for there to be more written than the statement that I created the design lol


My English prof would probably smack me with an F for my incomplete sentences in my descriptions.

And I dearly wish we had paragraphs so that I can separate the repetition of keywords in that first incomplete sentence from essential information on what is not obvious to the human eye and only reveals itself if open the zazzle tool and can comprehend basic design tools with layers and objects with editable properties.


I don't write incomplete sentences. I describe my design, in one way or another, and add in that I created it. Sometimes I say how I created it, what program I used, and such. I just don't want to type out more than is necessary. Some designs of mine do not lend themselves to full blown-out descriptions, while once in awhile one might. I add in more info if the product is set as a text/image template. Basically I just want to make sure that it is known that I am the one that created the design on the product. When I am in the mood to shop online, I only want to know about the product. If I have to scroll past a long design description I feel bad for the designer for taking time to write out something that I won't read. Others may, but not me, therefore I probably tend to write descriptions suited for people that shop like I do. Do I miss out on sales from those that want to read a novella? Possible, but I have no way of knowing so I don't worry about it.

OK, I may have drifted off-course somewhat, so I'm stopping before this gets even more wordy! LOL!
Posted: Monday, January 07, 2019 7:05:01 PM
The reason to write a good description is because you are (at least in theory) adding value to the page, and providing something that a machine can parse for keywords (artificial intelligence, anyone?)

But do write for human consumption as well as machine parsing, and try to get beyond a dry description to something that will grab the interest and imagination of those humans who do read it. And believe me, it's something I really struggle with, so I feel the pain y'all go through with them.
Posted: Monday, January 07, 2019 10:43:58 PM
Gina ©gleem wrote:
vivendulies wrote:
Gina ©gleem wrote:
I don't read designer descriptions. I wish we didn't have to write them. I only write them so I can say I created the design. Yeah I toss in others bit of info, but only for there to be more written than the statement that I created the design lol


My English prof would probably smack me with an F for my incomplete sentences in my descriptions.

And I dearly wish we had paragraphs so that I can separate the repetition of keywords in that first incomplete sentence from essential information on what is not obvious to the human eye and only reveals itself if open the zazzle tool and can comprehend basic design tools with layers and objects with editable properties.


I don't write incomplete sentences. I describe my design, in one way or another, and add in that I created it. Sometimes I say how I created it, what program I used, and such. I just don't want to type out more than is necessary. Some designs of mine do not lend themselves to full blown-out descriptions, while once in awhile one might. I add in more info if the product is set as a text/image template. Basically I just want to make sure that it is known that I am the one that created the design on the product. When I am in the mood to shop online, I only want to know about the product. If I have to scroll past a long design description I feel bad for the designer for taking time to write out something that I won't read. Others may, but not me, therefore I probably tend to write descriptions suited for people that shop like I do. Do I miss out on sales from those that want to read a novella? Possible, but I have no way of knowing so I don't worry about it.

OK, I may have drifted off-course somewhat, so I'm stopping before this gets even more wordy! LOL!


I probably could make a text block that completes "product xy with/featuring such and such style of whatever in this and that color doing something." or add a text, which distinguishes the handful of minimally altered public domain images from my originals but I'm happy with the undefined "by Vivendulies" which already suggests, that I'm the artist, so why elaborate.
Smile
Posted: Tuesday, January 08, 2019 3:22:49 AM
I don't know if this still holds true, but a couple years ago, I wrote a description for a clock in which I said it would look great hung on a wood-paneled wall. The word "wood" appeared nowhere else, not in the title, not in the tags, but that word was nevertheless picked up by a bot, and the consequence was a little popup message claiming no actual wood in the design. I removed the line about looking good against wood, and the popup was never to be seen again. Conclusion: Our descriptions are used for more than just SEO.
Posted: Tuesday, January 08, 2019 4:28:39 AM
Colorwash wrote:
I don't know if this still holds true, but a couple years ago, I wrote a description for a clock in which I said it would look great hung on a wood-paneled wall. The word "wood" appeared nowhere else, not in the title, not in the tags, but that word was nevertheless picked up by a bot, and the consequence was a little popup message claiming no actual wood in the design. I removed the line about looking good against wood, and the popup was never to be seen again. Conclusion: Our descriptions are used for more than just SEO.




I encountered the same phenomenon with my electric guitar design with a lightening bolt across the guitar body for fans of heavy metal. It got the "no metal in design" pop-up. Woops. So I changed it to rock. There is apparently no "faux materials" pop up for rock. I guess the Zazzle customers don't take everything for granite.
Posted: Tuesday, January 08, 2019 5:31:18 AM
Shame on you, Susannah! LOL
Posted: Tuesday, January 08, 2019 7:30:30 AM
Yep, on my pillows that I said would "look great on your new leather couch" now have the warning that no leather will be used in the making of this pillow.
Posted: Tuesday, January 08, 2019 10:31:35 AM
I believe it all began with the "glitter" problem, which quickly expanded into wood, leather, lace, and other things I've doubtless not tripped across. "Lace" is a tough one because you can't even mention a "lacy" design, which a lot of people create.
Posted: Tuesday, January 08, 2019 11:08:53 AM
Colorwash wrote:
I believe it all began with the "glitter" problem, which quickly expanded into wood, leather, lace, and other things I've doubtless not tripped across. "Lace" is a tough one because you can't even mention a "lacy" design, which a lot of people create.


I 've got them all... lolLaughing
Posted: Tuesday, January 08, 2019 11:54:53 AM
Yup, I've noticed popups from "lacy" and "gold foil." My question is: Why does that matter enough to take those words out of our descriptions, etc.?
Posted: Tuesday, January 08, 2019 12:03:44 PM
AprilThird wrote:
Yup, I've noticed popups from "lacy" and "gold foil." My question is: Why does that matter enough to take those words out of our descriptions, etc.?


I guess the pop up could be confusing to a buyer but I just left mine alone hoping maybe it might make them read the description out of curiosity. LOL
Posted: Tuesday, January 08, 2019 1:08:58 PM
My thought is that if a customer looks at a greeting card with an image of a wooden lawn chair and the popup says it contains no wood, the customer is going to think Zazzle has gone 'round the bend. Same issue but even worse for a depiction of a heavy metal band. I believe they call this sort of thing unintended consequences. At least the consequences don't involve people dying.
Posted: Tuesday, January 08, 2019 9:40:27 PM
LOL! I have a bunch of pet template designs where I mention furbaby in the description, as well as some having the text "furever in my heart", and I get a pop up saying the fur is simulated an not actual fur would be in the design. LOL!
Posted: Wednesday, January 09, 2019 3:20:57 AM
Imagine what it would be like if robots took over the world. The singer, Jewel, would go everywhere with a popup sprouting from her head.
Posted: Friday, January 11, 2019 9:16:14 PM
Colorwash wrote:
Imagine what it would be like if robots took over the world. The singer, Jewel, would go everywhere with a popup sprouting from her head.


Laughing Laughing Laughing
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