Glass Tumbler & Shot Glasses Official Tips and Tricks Thread 3 pages: 1 2 [3]
Posted: Sunday, December 16, 2018 5:17:10 PM
mothersdaisy wrote:
Will these be added to the zazzleblank store?

Or have they been added and I'm just not seeing them.

Or are they not being added.


thanks!

SaraH


Enter 'glass' in the search for blanks. It is faster than walking down the tree.
Posted: Tuesday, December 18, 2018 4:28:09 PM
We ordered this shot glass from J's Zazzle store for our landlady roommate who is a bowhunter. We ordered it 12/10 and received it 12/17. The original promise for delivery was 12/27 to 1/3. We are very happy with the glass and the delivery. Here is a photo of the glass we received.



Here is where it is available on Zazzle.

Posted: Monday, March 25, 2019 1:42:42 PM
I know Zazzle had a very thorough explanation of how to design for conical shapes, but I'm still lost. With the manual version, are we supposed to modify the design so that it's distorted "the other way", so it'll look undistorted when it's put on the shot glass? I'm completely confused. There oughta be a Photoshop tutorial or something for designing for shot glasses and other items with a conical shape.
Posted: Monday, March 25, 2019 2:03:11 PM
For example, if I take a non-distorted image, such as this example, and set it into the manual layer, it get's distorted and curved upwards. So would I have to curve it downwards, so that it'll be straight when I put it onto the glass?
Posted: Monday, March 25, 2019 2:58:25 PM
Connie wrote:
For example, if I take a non-distorted image, such as this example, and set it into the manual layer, it get's distorted and curved upwards. So would I have to curve it downwards, so that it'll be straight when I put it onto the glass?


You can just choose the auto warp and the design tool will adjust it for you.
Posted: Monday, March 25, 2019 3:09:28 PM
On some images it's still distorted even with the auto-warp, just not as much, so I want to figure out how to make images specifically for these types of things.
Here is the same image with the auto-warp: You can see it's still somewhat distorted.:
Posted: Monday, March 25, 2019 3:15:20 PM
Connie wrote:
On some images it's still distorted even with the auto-warp, just not as much, so I want to figure out how to make images specifically for these types of things.


okSmile did you try googling it? I use Gimp and that is what I do when I need to learn a new trick.
Posted: Monday, March 25, 2019 3:16:32 PM
Connie wrote:
For example, if I take a non-distorted image, such as this example, and set it into the manual layer, it get's distorted and curved upwards. So would I have to curve it downwards, so that it'll be straight when I put it onto the glass?

Yep. Look at the manual design shape, it is slightly curved downwards. What you have to do in your image program is to copy and paste the shape in your image file and use a tool that allows you a curved distortion of your image element. Make it so that the curvature follows the one of the designer shape and you're set. Not worth the hassle, tho, use the auto-warping shape. Their probably dedicated software will do a better job.
Posted: Monday, March 25, 2019 3:19:36 PM
Here's another example with the auto-warp:

You can see that the bottom part is smaller than the top.
Posted: Monday, March 25, 2019 3:24:38 PM
Connie wrote:
On some images it's still distorted even with the auto-warp, just not as much, so I want to figure out how to make images specifically for these types of things.
Here is the same image with the auto-warp: You can see it's still somewhat distorted.:

That's pretty certainly a preview thing, you know they aren't 100% accurate. I'm almost sure, their software will work properly on the real print. The only way to find out is to order one with a test image on it. But there is still a slight visual issue, your eye will probably still notice something. I personally would avoid too wide, straight designs on these glasses.
Posted: Monday, March 25, 2019 5:29:27 PM
Yes, I guess that is the best solution. I just chose the plane for an example, because it's a more extreme sample than some other things. But I would still like to know how to do that type of designing. I did an internet search, but I couldn't find any tutorials.
Posted: Monday, March 25, 2019 10:26:11 PM
Connie wrote:
Yes, I guess that is the best solution. I just chose the plane for an example, because it's a more extreme sample than some other things. But I would still like to know how to do that type of designing. I did an internet search, but I couldn't find any tutorials.

In Photoshop, Corel Photopaint and surely in other more advanced image editing programs, too, you have a distortion map tool. It's a grid that is put on an element and which you can shape at will, using the points and lines. here's a YT video explaining it on Photoshop. There are others.

https://youtu.be/EkCUXlfivKo

OH! Just found one that explains how to curve an image for a tumbler, still in Photoshop - and the tumbler design shape looks identical to zazzle's one:

https://youtu.be/Bo4qZu78QGs

have fun Smile
Posted: Monday, March 25, 2019 11:57:24 PM
.
Outch! I just watched the photoshop "tutorial". never ever save a file for web when you intend to print. Save for web is optimized for screen not print and because you want really small files on the internet the compression rate is high and compression usually means reducing the quality of the image. Information gets lost for good.
Posted: Tuesday, March 26, 2019 1:41:06 AM
vivendulies wrote:
.
Outch! I just watched the photoshop "tutorial". never ever save a file for web when you intend to print. Save for web is optimized for screen not print and because you want really small files on the internet the compression rate is high and compression usually means reducing the quality of the image. Information gets lost for good.

Didn't watch the videos, only scanned them quickly for the distortion technique, that's all what matters in this case. How to save is another story and I guess and hope, every designer here interested in some more complex fonctionality knows how to properly save the file.

That said, and as a hint for less advanced designers: I highly discourage to use these save for web and whatever automatized options. First of all, work on the originals, possibly at given original size or safely enlarged (not reduced) to the basic size you need and in RGB color scheme, save the layered original in the software's proprietary file format and only then flatten it and make your final steps depending on the image size and type you need. In the case of 4-color prints convert (if requested) to CMYK using appropriate/given color profiles, in the case of JPG web (not Zazzle) usage reduce to the wanted size and choose a proper compression rate, always opting for the 4:4:4 compression method without subsampling (if available) - this method avoids ugly artifacts and color distortions on plain tones, especially on reds. Save the dedicated images in different files of course.

JPGs for Zazzle:

When you save a JPG for Zazzle, use if possible no compression on smaller sized and less complex imagery (e.g. mostly flat plain colors, blurred backgrounds etc), or, better, the PNG format. On complex and large files you may want to reduce the heavy file size of uncompressed JPG and lossless compressed PNG. This can be safely done with significant MB savings and no visual impact by slightly compressing the image, using a 10% compression rate and the 4:4:4 sampling method. I guarantee, you will not note any visual difference between a non/lossless compressed and a low non-subsampled compressed JPG. Especially on complex imagery such as colorful landscapes this will save you a ton of MB to deal with on your disc and uploads.
Posted: Tuesday, March 26, 2019 2:57:43 PM
@PetsDreamlands, thank you for the links. That second guy doesn't know too much about Photoshop, LOL, he didn't even know about "Save As..." I think I have a good idea of how to warp the image, though.
@vivendulies, yes, that second tutorial is awful in several respects. The guy should have figured out how to do simple things in Photoshop like save files, before trying to make a tutorial about something more advanced.
Posted: Tuesday, March 26, 2019 3:42:32 PM
LOL, sorry for the bad advice. My bad. Was a bit in a hurry and didn't want to waste time on something I already know. But was now wondering if he really is that bad, and ouch, that hurts, ROFL.

Anyway, the goal was to show what functionality I meant. I work on Corel Photopaint and on a German version, so it's always a bit difficult to find the counterpart in an English Photoshop.

BTW, one of the best channels on YT for PS tutorials is PiXimperfect. That guy is good, shows great tricks, and is relaxing, too. Here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMrvLMUITAImCHMOhX88PYQ
Posted: Tuesday, March 26, 2019 4:05:13 PM
PetsDreamlands wrote:
LOL, sorry for the bad advice. My bad. Was a bit in a hurry and didn't want to waste time on something I already know. But was now wondering if he really is that bad, and ouch, that hurts, ROFL.

Anyway, the goal was to show what functionality I meant. I work on Corel Photopaint and on a German version, so it's always a bit difficult to find the counterpart in an English Photoshop.

BTW, one of the best channels on YT for PS tutorials is PiXimperfect. That guy is good, shows great tricks, and is relaxing, too. Here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMrvLMUITAImCHMOhX88PYQ

No worries, the actual part about warping was good, it's just the rest of the video that was awful. And it worked out pretty good, because I saw another video in the sidebar for a different Photoshop tutorial, that showed me a trick I had no idea existed for isolating complex things like trees.
I'll check out that channel. Thank you.
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