Creating products to complete store
Posted: Wednesday, August 28, 2019 5:32:26 AM
who/ what are we creating products for? i'm a painter and don't necessarily want words all over my images. Can anyone suggest products with this in mind?
Posted: Wednesday, August 28, 2019 6:14:54 AM
try notecards, tapestries all forms of wall art such as canvases, metal and acrylic and posters.

also all over print totebags work well with art, trinket trays, paperweights, leggings, candy tins, just to name a few.

As you can see there are lots of options that work well without text.

I will let you know that it does seem that monogrammed products with names or initials seem to sell better than plain ones.

Phone cases are a good place to start if you want to add a monogram to test it out.

Good luck

Posted: Wednesday, August 28, 2019 6:16:51 AM
Posters, canvas prints, acrylic and wood panels are suitable for fine art. Depending on your art, even blankets, pillows and clocks would work too. Zazzle has a ton of products, go through them and see what your art would look good on.
Posted: Wednesday, August 28, 2019 6:17:28 AM
Oh I'm so slow, you beat me to it Shelli
Posted: Wednesday, August 28, 2019 6:20:09 AM
waterart wrote:
Oh I'm so slow, you beat me to it Shelli


hey you just reinforced my ideas and add some I hadn't thought of! 2 artist heads are better than one. Grin
Posted: Wednesday, August 28, 2019 6:24:12 AM
Enlarge your art in the design tool so that it covers the whole space. No one will buy them with the extra white space around them as you have on the products you already have up in your store.
Posted: Wednesday, August 28, 2019 7:13:06 AM
ok - so a customized design product for profile completion, can be done with no words... to be more specific, I think i mistook the two sections...lol, TY! for the feedback
Posted: Wednesday, August 28, 2019 7:17:26 AM
Thanks Maz. I appreciate that. You've found that people have aversion to letterbox framing? Even on wood?
Posted: Wednesday, August 28, 2019 7:39:46 AM
michael morehouse wrote:
Thanks Maz. I appreciate that. You've found that people have aversion to letterbox framing? Even on wood?

If you look at it objectively, it doesn't appear framed at all. On the other hand, you can give it a frame, even if it's as simple as placing a rectangular shape beneath the image. Here's an example where I framed a vintage painting by outlining it in beige and placing it on a black background. It's the same as physically matting a tangible image for display but doing it digitally.


Posted: Wednesday, August 28, 2019 8:17:32 AM
Most all over print product go well with paintings



You'll have to lock down the size but small and medium blankets are good fit


Tank tops and leggings crop quiet a bit of but still with some paintings they look quiet interesting.





I didn't create complete products just so quick transfers for a general impressions for you to consider.

There are a ton more: pillows, mouse pads, laptop skins, mugs, ...

Nobody said you have to include text, though with a frame like with the tote bag and the blanket you could offer it on the rim, the same way you can offer text above and below for business cards and other more text based products.

Posted: Wednesday, August 28, 2019 8:25:51 AM
michael morehouse wrote:
Thanks Maz. I appreciate that. You've found that people have aversion to letterbox framing? Even on wood?


Just my two cents...

I know there are people that appreciate the framing. I, for one, do have an aversion to it, the same way I'd rather watch a full-screen movie versus a wide-screen version. Being up close in the story means more to me than a few extra inches of space. (Now, if there are considerable portions of the movie where heads are cut off, etc, I'll take the wide-screen.)

In the case of buying paintings, I'll take full canvas over this framing style any day. I don't ever feel the need to customize something with art on it, but I do want the entire print area to have the painting on it. That said, I would definitely buy a product in which the artwork has been framed the way Colorwash presented, as it looks more professional and appealing.

That's just me, but I wanted to present a point of view in which a person does not have an eye for letterbox framing. Smile
Posted: Wednesday, August 28, 2019 8:39:56 AM
jdcreativegifts wrote:
michael morehouse wrote:
Thanks Maz. I appreciate that. You've found that people have aversion to letterbox framing? Even on wood?


Just my two cents...

I know there are people that appreciate the framing. I, for one, do have an aversion to it, the same way I'd rather watch a full-screen movie versus a wide-screen version. Being up close in the story means more to me than a few extra inches of space. (Now, if there are considerable portions of the movie where heads are cut off, etc, I'll take the wide-screen.)

In the case of buying paintings, I'll take full canvas over this framing style any day. I don't ever feel the need to customize something with art on it, but I do want the entire print area to have the painting on it. That said, I would definitely buy a product in which the artwork has been framed the way Colorwash presented, as it looks more professional and appealing.

That's just me, but I wanted to present a point of view in which a person does not have an eye for letterbox framing. Smile


Some do, some don't. Some add that cinema look to their work and consider it fashionable.
This is really just a personal preference and don't think there have been any studies, which of it is more popular and sells better.
Some artists have an aversion to cropping some don't. In the end the artist knows best, what (s)he wants and can tolerate.

.
Posted: Wednesday, August 28, 2019 9:18:47 AM
jdcreativegifts wrote:
michael morehouse wrote:
Thanks Maz. I appreciate that. You've found that people have aversion to letterbox framing? Even on wood?


Just my two cents...

I know there are people that appreciate the framing. I, for one, do have an aversion to it, the same way I'd rather watch a full-screen movie versus a wide-screen version. Being up close in the story means more to me than a few extra inches of space. (Now, if there are considerable portions of the movie where heads are cut off, etc, I'll take the wide-screen.)

In the case of buying paintings, I'll take full canvas over this framing style any day. I don't ever feel the need to customize something with art on it, but I do want the entire print area to have the painting on it. That said, I would definitely buy a product in which the artwork has been framed the way Colorwash presented, as it looks more professional and appealing.

That's just me, but I wanted to present a point of view in which a person does not have an eye for letterbox framing. Smile

It's probably apples and oranges when comparing movies with paintings. Even paintings on canvas wraps are actually framed by the depth around them. On a greeting card or postcard, however, having the image go edge to edge can work extremely well. In other words, context is everything.

Posted: Wednesday, August 28, 2019 10:24:00 AM
As a professional I never add text to the photos of my original handmade creations on Zazzle (unless the words are handmade and are already a part of the creation).

In general I think all over printed products or products with just a small amount of blank space work well for original artwork. You can use a background color if its plain white and looks unfinished. Since you are into skateboarding you may want to see if any of your paintings will work on a skateboard. The best thing to do is to go through the list of products and find what works with your artwork and interest. Also its OK to leave blank space if it works. Wood is a good example of where blank space around the image may work well if its natural wood or have the color of natural wood. You may want to take a look at my Zazzle storefront including the wood posters in media to see what I mean.
Posted: Wednesday, August 28, 2019 10:45:11 AM
Colorwash wrote:

It's probably apples and oranges when comparing movies with paintings.


Just offering a point of view since it was asked if people have an aversion to letterbox framing. Just take out the part about movies and I still have the same opinion. Just one lone opinion to show that yes, in answer to the question, there are people that have an aversion to letterbox framing.

I love the artwork, by the way. Love I wish I had half that talent!
Posted: Wednesday, August 28, 2019 12:40:04 PM
Michael, do yourself a favor... read this about Titles, Tags and Descriptions. No one will find your work with the meta data you are using now.
Posted: Wednesday, August 28, 2019 1:40:20 PM
jdcreativegifts wrote:
michael morehouse wrote:
Thanks Maz. I appreciate that. You've found that people have aversion to letterbox framing? Even on wood?


Just my two cents...

I know there are people that appreciate the framing. I, for one, do have an aversion to it, the same way I'd rather watch a full-screen movie versus a wide-screen version. Being up close in the story means more to me than a few extra inches of space. (Now, if there are considerable portions of the movie where heads are cut off, etc, I'll take the wide-screen.)

In the case of buying paintings, I'll take full canvas over this framing style any day. I don't ever feel the need to customize something with art on it, but I do want the entire print area to have the painting on it. That said, I would definitely buy a product in which the artwork has been framed the way Colorwash presented, as it looks more professional and appealing.



That's just me, but I wanted to present a point of view in which a person does not have an eye for letterbox framing. Smile



One thing the framing and borders do is allow you to use art that is just slightly too small to cover an area with out the blurry warning.

I like them sometimes like with the blanket example Vivendulies gave above I think the black and gold adds a touch of class and interest.

Nice work Michael. love the impressionist feeling.
Posted: Wednesday, August 28, 2019 5:19:41 PM
LM glidersleeve, thanks for the link, yes i could use some work in this area, FS
Posted: Wednesday, August 28, 2019 5:28:53 PM
LM Gildersleeve wrote:
Michael, do yourself a favor... read this about Titles, Tags and Descriptions. No one will find your work with the meta data you are using now.
Thanks LM. Yes! I'll prolly have more questions for you over time. I'm definitely learning this part of selling work...lots about the best way to do things
Posted: Wednesday, August 28, 2019 5:33:41 PM
Shelli Fitzpatrick wrote:
jdcreativegifts wrote:
michael morehouse wrote:
Thanks Maz. I appreciate that. You've found that people have aversion to letterbox framing? Even on wood?


Just my two cents...

I know there are people that appreciate the framing. I, for one, do have an aversion to it, the same way I'd rather watch a full-screen movie versus a wide-screen version. Being up close in the story means more to me than a few extra inches of space. (Now, if there are considerable portions of the movie where heads are cut off, etc, I'll take the wide-screen.)

In the case of buying paintings, I'll take full canvas over this framing style any day. I don't ever feel the need to customize something with art on it, but I do want the entire print area to have the painting on it. That said, I would definitely buy a product in which the artwork has been framed the way Colorwash presented, as it looks more professional and appealing.



That's just me, but I wanted to present a point of view in which a person does not have an eye for letterbox framing. Smile



One thing the framing and borders do is allow you to use art that is just slightly too small to cover an area with out the blurry warning.

I like them sometimes like with the blanket example Vivendulies gave above I think the black and gold adds a touch of class and interest.

Nice work Michael. love the impressionist feeling.


Thanks El Reno, I'm stoked about getting this going! And am going to check out your work as well Smile
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